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The Beryl Institute invites members to submit posts on patient experience related topics. For guidelines and information on submitting a post for consideration, please contact us at info@theberylinstitute.org.

 

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Positively Impacting Staff Engagement and the Patient Experience with Community Giving

Posted By Magali Tranié, Wednesday, November 14, 2018
Updated: Wednesday, November 14, 2018

As one of the eight active lenses of the healthcare experience framework1, staff engagement is recognized as fundamental to the successful realization of a positive patient experience2.

An organization’s staff engagement strategy should comprise of numerous elements3, and some form of community giving activity should be one. It’s the holiday season after all, a wonderful time to remember the importance of helping others! Yes, it’s something close to my heart so I’ll admit I’m a bit biased, but there’s actual some science behind the benefits too.

According to research, giving back benefits not just the recipient(s), but your health and happiness and communities by creating social connections. Talk about a win-win-win!

So, if you’re ready to implement community giving as one of your staff engagement initiatives, here are four things to consider for maximum impact:

  1. Get Senior Leadership Support
    The first step should be ensuring leadership buy-in, which should seem obvious since “culture & leadership” is another active lens of the experience framework1. For example, we list “community” as one of our company’s purpose along with associates, customers and their patients. We post this purpose all over our offices’ walls and desks as a way of making that commitment public!

  2. Leverage Your Field – or Simply Your Neighborhood
    Your facility’s discipline can help guide you towards charities that are within your space. It makes sense for an imaging center to rally around breast cancer awareness, or for a cardiologist to support the American Heart Association, to point out the obvious. There are many healthcare-related non-profits to pick from – as well as many healthcare recognition days to leverage.

    For instance, since we provide linen rental and laundry services to healthcare, we partner with some local chapters of Ronald McDonald Houses to clean their linen at no charge, and we donate to St. Jude Children's Research Hospital through payroll deductions, to name a few.

    Alternatively, you can decide to support your local community too, directly impacting your staff and perhaps even patients. Is there a park nearby that needs a little TLC? A charity close to a staff member’s heart? Our ImageFIRST Fort Myers team had planned a Habitat for Humanity volunteering event only to find out one of their recent hire had been a beneficiary of Habitat!

    Your patients may also be a great inspiration for ideas. In May 2018, we partnered with one of our customers Surgery Care Affiliates and nonprofit One World Surgery, which they are foundational corporate partner of. Our entire leadership team got to work to donate and assemble 250 backpacks of school supplies for young students in Honduras who cannot afford these basic necessities.

  3. Involve and Empower Staff
    Once you get leadership buy-in, you’ll need a small committee. Build a team made up of positive and passionate “locker room leaders” who can spread the enthusiasm and create energy around the activities you decide on. Ensure their managers is on-board with their participation and commitment.

    This team can help execute, gather ideas, give you a pulse of what’s important to your staff (so you can bring community giving activities that matter to them), and gather feedback after each event. For example, we found out some of our associates have difficulty leaving the office to participate due to recurring weekly work. We’ve modified our community giving activities to include events both outside and inside the office walls.

  4. Integrate Community Giving Activities Within Staff Engagement Calendar
    After a kick-off meeting, set recurring quarterly meetings to plan the next three to six months. Work with your committee to develop a calendar of activities that you can integrate within your (hopefully) pre-existing staff engagement calendar.

Community giving is a wonderful way to engage your staff, so long as you plan ahead and dovetail it into your existing activities. Here’s a checklist and calendar to help you plan!

1. Wolf, J. A. (2018) Introducing a Framework for Experience in Healthcare. The Beryl Institute. https://www.theberylinstitute.org/blogpost/593434/308047/Introducing-a-Framework-for-Experience-in-Healthcare
2. 
Wolf, J.A. (2017) The State of Patient Experience: A Return to Purpose. The Beryl Institute. https://www.theberylinstitute.org/page/PXBENCHMARKING
3. 
Gallup Q12 Survey https://q12.gallup.com/Public/en-us/Features

Magali Tranié is the Director of Marketing for ImageFIRST Healthcare Laundry Specialists. She has 20 years of experience working in various marketing disciplines, leading teams and contributing to employee engagement strategies. She is passionate about community giving, being an active weekly volunteer for a local animal shelter since 2006, giving annually to a variety of non-profits, participating to one-off volunteering opportunities throughout the year, and sponsoring a child in Rwanda since 2017.

Tags:  community giving  culture  staff engagement  volunteerism 

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How Staff Engagement and Stress Management Can Impact the Patient Experience

Posted By Martijn Hartjes, Monday, October 30, 2017
Updated: Monday, October 30, 2017

One of the major transformations occurring in healthcare today is the shift toward seeing the patient as a consumer. Similar to other industries that are driven by customer service, health systems are recognizing the impact the patient experience has on consumer loyalty, institutional reputation and topline financial results. The business case is clear. And rather than being an industry push, patient experience now has a meaningful pull – 82% of health systems recognize patient experience as a top priority, and 89% of consumers reported that their experience is extremely important, according to The Beryl Institute’s recent research, The State of Patient Experience 2017: A Return to Purpose.

The lesser understood story about patient experience is its potential to improve patient engagement, staff engagement and even clinical value for patients. In my field of diagnostic imaging, the patient experience has been shown to be a critical component to getting the image right the first time. In MR imaging, the biggest impediment to a diagnostic quality scan is patient movement. When patients move – due to stress or discomfort – imaging quality is likely to be compromised. That can mean repeat scans and delayed time to treatment for patients. It can also mean frustration for staff and radiologists and consternation for radiology administrators who need to do more with less. 

Staff Engagement is Key to Patient Experience

A patient’s care experience is directly dependent on the engagement of their caregiver. Staff involvement plays an essential role in how the patient views their exam and subsequent treatment as cited in the Institute’s report that 68% of health systems recognize that highly engaged employees are key to the patient experience. When it comes to a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam, there is a human-to-human interaction that no machine can replace, and technologists are on the front lines of guiding patients and their families through this often stressful situation.

However, if the staff finds themselves overworked, stressed or burdened with reporting tasks or technical complexity, it is the patient who will ultimately be at risk. Having technology that supports a positive patient experience by making the technologist’s job easier can create a stronger patient-staff dynamic. 

Reducing Patient Stress to Improve Imaging Outcomes

As consumers of healthcare, today’s patients are making decisions on where to receive treatment based on their expectations of service and preferences. We are seeing patients choose imaging locations that provide a less stressful situation over those that are far more convenient. Based on our experience, we know patients travel hundreds of miles to experience a more comfortable scanner experience with open scanners, rather than going to a more convenient location with smaller, closed scanners.

In addition to impacting their facility choices, patient stress in MR exams inflicts a high clinical, operational and financial toll, leading to reduced workflow and patient dissatisfaction. When patients feel apprehensive, they are more likely to move and distort the exam. Such motion complications cause 1 in 5 MRI exams to require a rescan, which can cost an institution an estimated $592 per hour, and a $115K loss per scanner every year. In this way, patient comfort is fundamental to guaranteeing high-quality diagnostic images.

One way to reduce patient stress is to humanize the experience by providing consistent communication throughout the process and create an interactive atmosphere from start to finish. Communicating the smallest details, like how the scanner table will move or how long the scan may take, will help set expectations and dramatically reduce patient anxiety. It’s not just the patient that needs empathy and comfort but the patient’s family as well. The Beryl Institute’s research confirms that the majority (80%) of respondents believed patient experience efforts have a positive impact on reducing patient and family anxiety to a great extent.

Letting Patient Experience Lead the Way

Across the industry, patient experience efforts are becoming an integral part of the fabric of care delivery and are being recognized as drivers for measurable outcomes. In the imaging field in particular, real insights from real patients are increasingly important to understanding their needs. By focusing on the people behind the images and by creating a calming, supportive environment, technology vendors and clinicians across the continuum of care can join forces to improving imaging outcomes and clinical value for patients. 

Martijn Hartjes is an experienced healthcare executive with a professional track record in multiple disciplines of the medical device industry. Currently, he serves as senior director, head of global MR product marketing at Philips. In this role, he is responsible for the global MRI marketing function, leading product management, clinical portfolio management and product marketing.

Tags:  care experience  consumer  imagining  loyalty  patient engagement  Patient Experience  staff engagement 

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