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The Beryl Institute invites members to submit posts on patient experience related topics. For guidelines and information on submitting a post for consideration, contact michelle.garrison@theberylinstitute.org.

 

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I’m an Industry Professional. Where I Go For Healthcare Recommendations Might Surprise You

Posted By Cally Ideus, Tuesday, March 27, 2018

I don’t like to think of myself as just a demographic. However, as a 43-year-old mother of five, I can’t help but identify with a famous trope in healthcare: women as the “Chief Medical Officers” of their households.

If you’re a woman, perhaps you can relate. We’re the healthcare gatekeepers for our families: 92% of us assist our loved ones with navigating care; 80% of household care decisions happen on our say-so. And research suggests that when we make these decisions for our loved ones, we rely heavily on social media to guide us.

As a professional in the industry, I understood all of this intellectually. But it took two overlapping health episodes to make me feel, on a visceral level, why we household Chief Medical Officers depend on social media to navigate our healthcare choices.

Where We Turn in a Crisis

The crisis began with a close friend’s devastating diagnosis. Just a year ago, before she got sick, we were skiing buddies. At 58, she was impossibly athletic, and she’d sailed past me on black-diamond courses without breaking a sweat. It was inconceivable that she’d ever become ill—until, of course, she did.

A week before Christmas, she learned that she had been diagnosed with inoperable, Stage IV soft-tissue carcinoma in her lungs. The prognosis was bleak. Stunned and scared for her, I wanted to lend a hand. The least I could do would be to help her find the best doctor she could.

I believed I was well equipped for this. My work puts me in contact with dozens of health systems on a regular basis, which meant I knew many knowledgeable professionals whom I could have called for a recommendation.

But I didn’t use those contacts at all. Instead, I started my search like over 80% of all healthcare consumers: online. In the heat of the moment, when I desperately wanted my friend to be in good hands, I felt compelled to turn to Google, Facebook, and star ratings on provider websites for validation.

Unfortunately, another panicked healthcare search experience would follow shortly thereafter when I got a phone call from my college-aged son. “Mom,” he told me, “I’m lying on the floor and I can’t get up.”

That frightened me. At the risk of sounding boastful, I can say that my son’s a very robust young man. A tri-sport athlete in high school, he once played through a serious bout of pneumonia, over my protests. If a health problem had literally floored him, I knew it must be serious.

My first instinct was to send him to the emergency room. After consulting with my sister, a medical professor at the nearest hospital, I learned that the ER had a serious backlog, and wouldn’t be able to see my son for four hours. My brother-in-law, a doctor, suggested urgent care.

So once again, I found myself (somewhat frantically) trawling through Google search results, trying to find a high-quality urgent-care clinic that could see him right away. My sister and brother-in-law pitched in as well—not by speaking with their colleagues, but by scanning Google results for top doctors in the area.

The reviews, provider websites and patient comments we found pointed the way to a nearby urgent-care provider, to whom I felt comfortable bringing my son. We got him an appointment, and learned that he had an extremely severe case of mono. A few weeks of bed rest later, and he was well again. Sadly, I never received a survey to compliment the amazing caring staff that took care of my son and his frantic mother. I did leave my reviews where I could, however, and raved to all who would listen on Facebook.

I wish I could say the same in conclusion to my friend’s fight with cancer. Despite our best efforts to secure her care, the insurmountable diagnosis ultimately claimed her life. Her voice lives on through her eternal comments left on social media, giving credit to the care she received throughout her journey.

The Emotional Pull of Stars

These are just two instances of how I—a relatively sophisticated and health-literate consumer—found star ratings on social media and provider websites irresistible when I needed help finding a provider. I’m certain that similar experiences happen thousands of times a day, all over the country. (In fact, there’s data to prove it: "Patient Ratings/Reviews" contain the most important information needed on a hospital website, according to the 2016 National Healthcare Consumer Study by NRC Health Market Insights.)

I believe that’s because of the unique frame of mind that a health crisis imposes on us. Such times can be frightening and extremely stressful, leaving us hungry for guidance, validation, and certainty. While no one can guarantee results in healthcare, I believe that we find comfort in the wisdom of the crowd.

Health systems looking to attract adult women, the gatekeepers of care for their families, should take note. Your online presence matters, a lot. And in cultivating it, you’ll be well served by giving your patients a voice, and by being transparent with what they have to say.

The more reviews accumulate, on your own website and elsewhere, the more information patients will have to help them with their care decisions. In moments of crisis, that information makes all the difference in the world—especially for “Chief Medical Officers” like me.

Cally Ideus is a combat veteran and international human intelligence scholar, and currently serves as a business development manager for NRC Health. In her role, Cally helps healthcare providers thrive in a consumer-driven economy by providing holistic customer intelligence essential to designing and delivering care experiences that surprise, delight, and inspire loyalty.

Her passions run deep for faith, family and justice. This is one of the reasons she speaks on multiple veteran and human intelligence subjects, but her favorite is “Battle ground on the home front” a story of survival after returning home. Cally lives in Nebraska on a ranch with her husband Jerod and sons Dalton, Quintin, Collin, Garret, and Mason. Her life wouldn’t be complete without the unconditional love of her two dogs, Daisy and Ziba.

Tags:  patient experience  perception  reviews  social media  star rating 

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Social Media and the Patient Experience

Posted By Andy Roller, Thursday, July 9, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, July 7, 2015

The patient journey is rapidly changing. The old patient journey went something like this:

  • Scenario 1: You got a referral from your primary care doctor and unquestioningly followed the directive. Based on your experience, you became a loyal patient, advocate (for better or worse), or indifferent.
  • Scenario 2: You asked a trusted friend or utilized some form of word of mouth. Based on your experience, you became a loyal patient, advocate (for better or worse), or indifferent.
  • Scenario 3: You became aware of a particular doctor, specialist, or practice – maybe through some form of traditional marketing (TV, Billboard, Newspaper, Direct Mail). You then considered and evaluated. You proceeded to set an appointment. You went through with the procedure or treatment. Again, based on your experience, you became a loyal patient, advocate (for better or worse), or indifferent.

Of course, every reputable practice will work to make the experience and the resulting word of mouth the best it can be. But my, how things have changed. With a rapidly increasing digital population, the patient experience starts much earlier. The journey-experience increasingly begins with online search. It continues through their experience with care they receive; then through online reviews and social media posts they publish.

According to 2014 Pew research, 86 percent of patients search online before booking a doctor’s appointment. And, as of 2013, 41 percent of patients were using social media to determine their choice of Healthcare Provider (HCP). 43 percent of medical visits originate from a search engine. These numbers are rising at a rapid pace.

A full 90 percent of patients 18-24 of age trust and make decisions based on what they find on social media. And over 25 percent of conversations on Facebook are about a health-related experience. Yet only 26 percent of hospitals in the US actively engage via social media. It's true that prospective patients don't often convert based on a single Facebook update. But the influence on patient decisions and advocacy is foolish to ignore. 

The new patient journey looks more like the following: 

The patient searches online related to symptoms, providers, reviews. They may share social updates and interact as they search. Keep in mind, what they're finding is largely the result of other patients who have posted about their experience. Marketers call this the the Zero Moment of Truth. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once the prospective patient finds what they are looking for, they make a decision to move forward. This is often called the First Moment of Truth. They may call or send an online form, make an appointment or schedule a consultation. Again, this moment may also be something they share with their social networks. 

The patient then attends their first appointment or procedure or hospital stay. This is their Second Moment of Truth. We most often think of this moment as the patient experience. It may be the core of their experience, but it's only part of the journey and experience. 

 

 

 

 

During and after the stay or procedure is when the majority of social sharing takes place. This sharing becomes the next prospective patient's Zero Moment of Truth. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


What will prospective patients find? How well are HCPs facilitating the patient experience along this journey?

At Expio, we teamed up with TCU's Neeley School of Business to create the following short report. We present the information in the context of a true story from the perspective of a Father dealing with his young son's medical care. View the full report here.

Andy Roller is the Founder and Owner of Expio. As a believer in the power of entrepreneurship for commerce and community development, he is also a community volunteer, board member of Panhandle Twenty/20 and part of Leadership Fort Worth. Andy was named one of Amarillo Chamber of Commerce’s Top 20 Under 40 Business Professionals in 2011. Andy is a fitness and health geek, guitar player, father to 5 super cool kids and husband of an Enchantress.

Tags:  Consumerism  patient experience  social media  voice 

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