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The Beryl Institute invites members to submit posts on patient experience related topics. For guidelines and information on submitting a post for consideration, please contact us at info@theberylinstitute.org.

 

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Top tags: patient experience  healthcare  communication  culture  patient  HCAHPS  Leadership  patient engagement  empathy  physician  survey  compassion  perception  physicians  technology  caregiver  community  data  employee engagement  family engagement  healing  Hospital  improving patient experience  collaboration  Consumerism  Expectations  interactions  patient and family engagement  pediatric  person-centered care 

It’s Time for Experience Professionals to Lead Technology Innovation

Posted By Samir Batra, Monday, October 29, 2018
Updated: Thursday, October 25, 2018

The role patient experience is playing in the provider environment today cannot be understated.

The Beryl Institute State of Patient Experience 2017 Study showcases the growth our industry has seen over time.

Organizations with individuals (CXO, Directors, Managers) with primary responsibility and direct accountability for addressing patient experience has gone from 22% of US hospitals to 58% in 2017 (n=944 US Hospitals).

On the other hand, consumers who say patient experience is significant to them in their healthcare decision making went from 67% in 2015 to 76% in 2017.

The importance of patient experience has been so far-reaching that boardrooms across the industry are taking account. In fact, according to the Advisory Board’s Annual Health Care CEO Survey in 2018, “meeting rising consumer demands for service” was in the top 5 priorities along with cost control, and exploring diversified, innovative revenue streams.

The good news is that there is overwhelming research that shows that improving patient experience not only leads to better quality outcomes, it, in fact, also leads to greater profitability for healthcare providers.

The not so good news is that while experience leaders are proactively focusing on experience, they are overwhelmingly finding themselves tasked with the other key initiatives in addition to their obvious focus areas (evaluating the patient, addressing patient feedback from surveys and reviews, execute improvement strategies) such as:

  • Improving physician and staff well-being and experience
  • Collaborating with quality/safety and performance improvement leaders and in some circumstances oversee the functions, drive patient engagement
  • Establishing communication plans, manage interactions with patients – digitally and in person

With increasing demands on their time, patient experience leaders and executives have to turn to technology to facilitate the impact patient experience can have on the bottom line of a provider organization and the resulting patient outcomes. In fact, technology is so closely tied to the major initiative of “meeting rising consumer demands for service”, consumer technology and the ability to get access in the palm of your hand has driven the focus on providing more information and an exceptional care experience to patients alike.

And the importance of technology in the provider arena around patient experience is being noted by leading CIOs across the country as well.

A new study by Impact Advisors and Scottsdale Institute shows that more than 80% of CIOs reported that their high priority is finding ways to improve digital health engagement and optimizing the patient experience. The high level of interest “underscores a growing recognition – especially among industry leaders – about the critical need to be able to compete on convenience, access to care and value – as defined by patients”, states the report.

Hospitals and clinics have to offer technologies that make care more accessible, convenient and the experience more seamless.

Which leads me to the question: If CEOs are focused on consumer demands for service, the CIO is focused on technology related to patient experience; then what should the patient experience leaders do?

And the answer is clear - they need to take charge now and guide the technologies that are being looked at by their organizations that are focused not only on patient experience but also engagement.

On the other hand, patient experience leaders also need to get intimately involved and have their voices heard by technology innovators and pioneers developing solutions for the industry. The technology industry needs to hear from those who spend their daily lives creating a better environment and experience for patients and providers alike.

The time is now to collaborate, share and move the patient experience industry forward and bring a realistic consumer revolution to the table that is validated by the key stakeholders. One of the best ways to do so is to get involved in The Beryl Institute's PX Solutions Feedback Program. Solutions providers gain access to the subject matter expertise of patient experience leaders and decision makers to obtain feedback to evaluate and assist in developing or enhancing programs and services. The candid feedback provides the potential for widespread and global application for healthcare and the opportunity to reinforce the commitment to support the patient experience movement.

Experience leaders are in a unique vantage point to share their insights – and the time has come to take lead and help usher in a new era of breakthrough tech innovation!

Samir Batra has been in healthcare for 17 years and has worked with many global healthcare provider organizations in helping them achieve operational efficiency and implementation of their strategic plans. Majority of his work has focused on the patient experience, workflow and cost optimization and the effective use of technology. Currently, Mr. Batra is the Founder & CEO of BAHA Enterprises. BAHA is focused on helping health tech companies grow by raising capital, providing strategic advice and guidance, and validation of their solutions. Prior to BAHA, he spent over 10 years in executive roles at start-ups (Oneview Healthcare, CareInSync, pCare - TVRC, and GetWellNetwork) focused on applying technology to effect clinical and patient processes to improve the patient experience and drive engagement. Passionate about contributing to thought-leadership, he is active with HIMSS (NorCal Board Member), ATA (Start-Up Health Advisor - American TeleMedicine Association), and The Beryl Institute (Resource Advisory Council).

Tags:  consumers  outcomes  profitability  provider environment  technology 

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Effective Patient Communication Builds Trust for Better Outcomes

Posted By William Maples, M.D., Monday, September 25, 2017
Updated: Monday, September 25, 2017

For physicians, a significant factor leading to optimal outcomes is to engage patients early on as part of the decision-making process. Understanding patients’ needs, along with their values and preferences, is critical to the success of your healthcare team.

However, we at The Institute for Healthcare Excellence have found that many times physicians don’t understand what their patients need or want from them. It takes effective patient communication—leading to an alignment of goals and expectations—to bring about positive outcomes and a stronger bottom line.

Patients need doctors who listen

What patients want most from doctors is to be respected and listened to. Technology and medical procedures may continue to evolve, but certain human needs will never change. Patients evaluate their relationship with a provider by asking: “Am I really being listened to? Am I being respected? Do you truly care about my health? Do you have enough time for me?” To get to “Yes” starts with doctors who listen well and build trust with patients.

The lost art of listening to patients

Physicians seem to have lost the art of listening to patients. On average, we interrupt our patients with an 18 seconds and often change what they really want to tell us. Research has found that up to 30% of the time, we completely miss why the patient is there to see us.1 It’s vital that we rekindle the skill of listening, of recognizing the emotions in the room and responding in a way that builds a trusting relationship with the patient and ultimately improves outcomes.2

In our work with health systems and hospitals to improve their patient satisfaction scores and medical outcomes, we’ve learned that creating an exceptional experience can lead to a culture of safety. As that culture of trust and teamwork grows, patient-adverse events begin to decline.

Physician leaders improve communication

The first step is to identify physicians who are ready to support initiatives that improve communication with patients. After all, the caregivers are the best choice to lead the effort, rather than having it dictated to them. Let’s not leave physicians out of the equation when they can play a major part in creating a high-quality experience for patients.

Of course, there’s never a perfect time to implement best practices for communication in healthcare. It takes patience and a deep commitment to nurturing a culture that’s built on relationship-based, patient-centered communication. It may be nine to 12 months before you see a measurable impact, and up to four years to realize the maximum benefit. Once that’s achieved, however, you can expect a fivefold return on your investment.

Better communication helps prevent physician burnout

One more factor to consider is that poor communication can increase the chance for preventable errors. When a physician is frustrated by inadequate communication with a patient, it can cause burnout—and that correlates to medical errors.

To help bring back the joy of practicing medicine physicians must build a meaningful relationship with patients. That involves learning to listen to patients, establishing a culture of trust and committing to executing a relationship-based communication plan. Often this approach surprises us as it does not take any longer. Meeting those objectives can transform the patient’s experience and lead to measurable, positive outcomes for you and your care team.

References

  1. Lipkin M, Putnam S, Lazare A. eds. The Medical Interview. Clinical Care, Education and Research. NY. Springer-Verlag.1995.p.531.
  2.  The importance of physician listening from the patients’ perspective: Enhancing diagnosis, healing, and the doctor–patient relationship. Justin Jagosha, , , Joseph Donald Boudreaub, Yvonne Steinerta, Mary Ellen MacDonaldc, Lois Ingramd doi:10.1016/j.pec.2011.01.028

William Maples, M.D. serves as PRC's Chief Medical Officer. Before joining PRC, Dr. Maples served as Senior Vice President and Chief Quality Officer at Mission Health in Asheville, North Carolina. Additionally, Dr. Maples serves as Executive Director of The Institute for Healthcare Excellence, where he and his consulting faculty employ a variety of strategies to improve patient experience and impact quality outcomes.

Tags:  communication  outcomes  patient engagement  patient's needs  physicians 

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