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The Beryl Institute Patient Experience Blog
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There’s No Place like Home…The Value of Connecting with Your Patient Experience Community

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Tuesday, June 13, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, June 13, 2017

I recently chatted with one of our members after she returned from another healthcare conference. While she enjoyed the event, she shared that the experience itself felt dramatically different than her time at our March Patient Experience Conference in Denver. I asked a few questions to try to understand what the difference was. The breakout sessions were great, the keynote speakers were inspiring, and it was a large crowd of other leaders in similar types of roles. Yet, she still felt something was lacking. Upon further reflection, she realized the missing element was the sense of community and emotional connection she experiences every year at The Beryl Institute conference.

Her comments reinforced feedback received after this year’s Patient Experience Conference. Participants said things such as, “Everyone was so kind and helpful…it was easy to meet people…it was so wonderful to be surrounded by like-minded people…we're all in this together!” These statements reflect things we hear often at the Institute, an appreciation for the welcoming and engaging community that has developed through a shared passion for building and sustaining the patient experience movement. 

Our community connects in many ways throughout the year – chatter on social media, regular discussions on listservs, and conversations through Topic Calls and Patient Advocacy Connection Calls. In recent months, we’ve also enjoyed watching dialogue between members explode in the chat box of our regular webinars where participants share where they’re logging in from, reconnect with old friends and tap into the tremendous wealth of knowledge that is represented in this patient experience community.

The virtual connections are powerful and a hallmark of The Beryl Institute. While these opportunities are invaluable, I would argue there is no replacement for spending time together in person. As the patient experience movement has grown, we’ve witnessed incredible connections between the leaders doing this work and an amazing energy and enthusiasm that comes when we gather together to share ideas, connect and learn. Our community believes patient experience is a foundational element of the overall healthcare experience, and there is something about getting together in person that inspires us to live and share that message.

At The Beryl Institute we continue to foster opportunities for face-to-face connections. Last week we announced the opening of the Call for Submissions for breakout sessions at Patient Experience Conference 2018 to be held April 16-18 in Chicago. We hope you will join us there and even consider submitting a proposal to share your patient experience successes.
 
But even before then we have many opportunities for you to engage face-to-face with patient experience peers. This fall we’ll hold Patient Experience Regional Roundtables in Canada, California, Louisiana and New York. Regional Roundtables are one-day programs bringing together the voices of healthcare leaders, staff, physicians, patients and families to convene, engage and expand the dialogue on improving patient experience. Through inspiring keynote sessions and working group discussion, participants leave with an expanded network, renewed energy and actionable ideas to support patient experience efforts in their own organizations.

We also have two upcoming Certified Patient Experience Professional (CPXP) preparation workshops. These are opportunities to gather with other patient experience leaders to not only network and share, but to prepare together for the CPXP exam. Community members will gather later this month in Chicago and in September in Los Angeles for full day courses reviewing the domains outlined in the job classification on which the CPXP examination is based. 

The Beryl Institute continues to be the global community of practice dedicated to improving the patient experience through collaboration and shared knowledge. We are a welcoming and engaging community. I am often reminded of an early Patient Experience Conference where a participant stood up and joyfully proclaimed “I have found my professional home!”  As a leader in the movement, we hope you view the Institute as your professional home, and we invite you to further connect with your patient experience family. 


Stacy Palmer, CPXP
Senior Vice President
The Beryl Institute 

Tags:  community of practice  Field of Patient Experience  healthcare  improving patient experience  leadership  networking  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  thought leadership 

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The Spirit of the PX Movement – Sharing, Learning and Improving Together

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Monday, December 12, 2016
Updated: Monday, December 12, 2016

After six years as a membership community focused on improving patient experience, we continue to be amazed and inspired by the generosity of our members and guests committed to this movement. The spirit of this work is illustrated perfectly by the willingness to share, learn and grow together.

Just last week we released a great example of this in action through the white paper, Guiding Principles for Patient Experience Excellence. We’re careful to always acknowledge there is no one recipe for improving patient experience, but we have identified eight themes consistent in organizations who have found success in this work. The paper shares those principles, reflects on why each is a critical consideration and, perhaps most importantly, highlights specific examples from 15 organizations who excel in one or more of these areas.

As in all the work shared through the Institute, the examples represent only a sample of the many approaches that could be tied to each principle. They are offered to spark thinking in ways others can move from concept to action. It’s the willingness of these organizations to share their successes that fuels that thinking for others.

The gifting of knowledge and experiences has helped to build the field of patient experience and establishes both credibility and accountability for our efforts. This year our sister organization, Patient Experience Institute, recognized the first three classes of Certified Patient Experience Professionals (CPXPs), an incredible statement and stride for the movement. We continue to see this work validated and see our community eager to spread the word on the importance of addressing experience excellence and sharing successes and challenges encountered along the way.

We wholeheartedly offer thanks to every individual and organization who contributed to this work over the past year. Thank you for every case study shared, On the Road visit or regional roundtable hosted, webinar or conference session presented, ListServ email sent, topic call or connection call attended and learning bite delivered. It’s through these and other collective efforts that we can truly shape this movement and positively impact the experiences of patients, families and caregivers.

Interested in learning more about how you can personally contribute to the community in 2017? Visit http://www.theberylinstitute.org/?page=CONNECTIONIDEAS.

 

Stacy Palmer, CPXP
Senior Vice President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  accountability  collaboration  community  community of practice  engagement  Field of Patient Experience  healthcare  improving patient experience  networking  patient experience  thought leadership 

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Become a Leader in the Patient Experience Movement

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Tuesday, August 5, 2014
Updated: Tuesday, August 5, 2014

I recently received a note from a new member who is early in her career and looking for ways to maximize her membership to get "plugged in” to the Institute and gain credibility within the patient experience community. We get questions like this often. While passionate about getting involved in the patient experience movement, many of our members aren’t quite sure how to get started.

To help, I want to share the suggestions I gave her. I believe they are applicable for patient experience leaders at any stage. First, leadership is not about years of experience. It’s about influence (and willingness to contribute). While healthcare has been around for centuries, a focused patient experience movement is still taking shape at all levels of healthcare organizations. To "plug in” and be a leader, you need to do one thing – share.

The power of sharing is what The Beryl Institute community is built upon and in doing so people reap even greater benefits themselves. Leadership in our movement is grounded in a generosity of spirit and contribution, collaboration and openness.

 The Beryl Institute offers many ways for you to share and be active participants in the patient experience movement.

  • Get engaged in the conversation. That's the best way to share what you're doing and learn from others. We have Patient Experience Leaders and Patient Advocacy listservs that are very active. Be sure to sign up for those and respond to questions and/or pose your own. And when you find something that’s successful in your organization – share it through a case study.

  • Attend a live event. We have a very engaged, energetic community and they love meeting and brainstorming with new people. It's also a great chance to find a mentor. We have two Regional Roundtables coming up in October - one in Boston and one in Seattle. And Patient Experience Conference 2015 will be April 8-10, 2015 in Dallas. If travel is a concern, you can talk to other members via phone on our monthly topic calls.

  • Immerse yourself in the PX Body of Knowledge (BOK). It's a community-driven framework highlighting the 15 domains critical for an effective PX leader. We currently have courses available for 8 of the 15 domains with the other 7 coming soon. You can gain lots of information from other resources available through your membership, but I always recommend the BOK courses to people looking to establish a solid foundation.

One of our members recently commented that he views his involvement with The Beryl Institute as much more than a membership. He believes his engagement is a bigger statement supporting the patient experience movement. His outlook exemplifies the passion we see everyday from the community.

In fact, I am constantly amazed by the eagerness of our members to contribute, get involved and truly become leaders in the movement. With over 60 members on our boards and councils, subgroups like the Patient Advocacy and Physician communities, and regular contributors to our guest blog, case studies and On the Road program, those desiring to be thought leaders in this critical movement have a place. You just need to choose to engage.

And for the many of you already involved in The Beryl Institute who want to do even more to support the movement, my advice to you is the same: share. One of the greatest ways to be a leader in the patient experience movement is to pass along a story, case study, research report or other resource that might inspire those around you to look at their roles differently, to see the impact they can have on creating the best possible experience for patients, families and caregivers. Simply, share. 

"Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap but by the seeds that you plant.”  - Robert Louis Stevenson


Stacy Palmer

Vice President, Strategy and Member Experience
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  community of practice  Field of Patient Experience  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  Leadership  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  service excellence  thought leadership 

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How Will You Inspire the Patient Experience Movement? Four Considerations for 2014

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Tuesday, January 14, 2014

I am inspired. The New Year has arrived with great energy at The Beryl Institute. We start 2014 as a global community of practice of over 20,000 professionals, focused without hesitation on ensuring the best in experience for patients, families and one another in healthcare.

I am inspired by the continued commitments expressed for this work: by The Beryl Institute’s Patient Experience Scholars who met recently to share their research and reinforce their willingness to encourage and support others; by the members of the Global Patient & Family Advisory Council who want to influence how patients and family members are heard and engaged in making a profound difference in healthcare; by the many contributing to the development of the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge courses soon to be available to the community; and by many more.

I am inspired by how in the first two weeks of a new year, such commitment and intent can emerge, built on all that has come before and focused with purpose on the great opportunities ahead. As I reflect on this idea, a question emerged and perhaps a challenge for each of us to consider:

How will you inspire the patient experience movement in the year ahead?

I pose this question with the hope that actions and considerations from the smallest moments of unparalleled kindness to the largest strategic triumphs all find room to take root and grow. Inspiration comes in all shapes and sizes, but in this diversity it has strong commonalities – it causes us to feel a sense of something special and powerful. It provides a boundless energy to influence, lead, change and make a difference. This is an exciting prospect in seeing that each of us can choose to have an impact. And while no two actions will be exactly alike, I do want to offer a few thoughts on how you can continue to frame your patient experience efforts to inspire yourself and others.

As we return to the definition of patient experience, I continue to experience its relevance time-and-time again in the application of these words to central actions associated with excellence. In reviewing its words – the sum of all interactions, shaped by an organization’s culture, that influence patient perceptions, across the continuum of care – I again see clear directions on moving your own experience efforts forward. They include:

1. Reinforce strategic focus. Patient experience has proven itself to be a relevant part of the healthcare conversation. It has surpassed the challenges of being dubbed a fad; it too has shown it has stronger legs than just serving as a policy framework. Experience is a central strategic pillar to organizational performance and success. Patient Experience in its broadest sense should be a clear and transparent component of every healthcare organization’s strategy.

2. Clarify and map your critical interactions. Experience doesn’t happen on billboards or in espoused actions, it happens at the most personal moments, at those points of engagement between one individual and another. The ultimate tool in patient experience improvement is your self, your heart, your hands and arms, your minds, your compassion and your common sense. We have a huge opportunity to map the interactions that occur on the patient path to ensure we consider the most effective way to respond at every touch point.

3. Model desired behaviors. Simply put, if interactions drive experience, then the behaviors that comprise them are the conduits that direct these interactions in one way or another. Organizational culture is shaped by behaviors, they represent the people, presence and purpose of an organization overall and no slogan, policy or program will trump the power of individual behavior. We must model, observe, coach and improve constantly to impact experience outcomes.

4. Expand your listening. As we ended 2013 exploring the Voices of Measurement, we learned that the power of data is only as valid as what we choose to do with it. Collection or reporting data for the sake of data misses the opportunity for learning and relevant action. To capitalize on the value of the voices that surround us in healthcare we must expand our listening. Experience is measured first in the direct voices of healthcare consumers, who remain our most significant mirror into our own efforts, but it is also found in the voices of our peers and colleagues. We are only capable of achieving our strategy through our people. They are much more than pawns to direct, but rather living resources accountable for ensuring excellence.

Perhaps these ideas will help spark your own thoughts on how you will choose to inspire the patient experience movement. Regardless of which direction you go, I hope you recognize the power that exists in your own personal choice and the ability to impact the experience of the person that is coming next. The year ahead can and should be about a great many things both personally and professionally. My hope is that you find you can and will be an inspiration in your efforts. This cause is too great for your efforts to be anything less. Now the question remains, what will you do? I look forward to your updates with great anticipation.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  accountability  Advocacy  body of knowledge  choice  community of practice  consumer advocacy  Continuum of Care  culture  defining patient experience  employee engagement  Field of Patient Experience  global defining patient experience  global healthcare  HCAHPS  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  Interactions  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  service excellence  thought leadership  voice 

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Reflecting on The Patient Experience Movement: The Power of Voices and Collaboration

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Wednesday, December 18, 2013
Updated: Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Patient Experience - Voices in CollaborationAs we stand at the end of each year, we tend to look back at all that led us to this moment and anticipate all that lies ahead. I stand here now with all of you that comprise our patient experience community, who live and breathe in your every action this patient experience movement, and can say without hesitation that together we have accomplished great things and together there are even more powerful moments to come.

 

This year has exemplified our core values at The Beryl Institute – the importance of community and the integral role of collaboration. We have worked to reinforce the true power of engaging all voices in the patient experience conversation. This gathering of voices has seen our patient experience community grow from 11,000 to 20,000 members and guests this year alone, representing over 45 countries. This gathering of voices has led to a year in which the foundational ideas of this movement have been reinforced and solidified. In our commitment to expand access to the greatest breadth and depth of individuals across healthcare we recently expanded our membership framework to provide access to all associates in any healthcare facility. These Institutional memberships enable staff at all levels, in all roles, across the range of healthcare organizations to engage, to learn and to lead in their own environments.

 

In expanding the conversation on voice itself, this year has been shaped by the Voices of Patient Experience series in which we heard from the C-Suite, front-line practice, students across healthcare disciplines, physicians, patients and families and those measuring the impact of our patient experience efforts. This collection of voices served to complement the many others that contributed to learning and sharing of ideas via webinars and case studies, Patient Experience Conference presentations and On the Road visits. Hundreds of you added your thoughts to the conversation via these and other outlets. This open sense of sharing, of giving, of collaboration has allowed the patient experience movement to thrive.

 

The voices series also raised a significant awareness for the community; to be an organization truly committed to patient experience, we had to move beyond the talk about what we do "to” patients and families, and reinforce an unwavering commitment to do "with”. This partnership in care underlines the very intent of the Institute to provide a place to learn from one another, and it was clear that included the voices of patients and families themselves. This led us to establish the Global Patient & Family Advisory Council, comprised of leading patient and family thinkers, writers, speakers and activists. It also had us collaborate with IHI at the 2013 National Forum to support the "Patient is In” Booth in which patients and family members could share input and ideas with forum participants. These voices remind us of the boundless value of this partnership in patient experience improvement.

 

The expansion of voices also led to the 2ndState of Patient Experience Study, the largest conducted to date on patient experience efforts, and revealed some interesting trends in the both the focus, intent and awareness of patient experience efforts. Yet, while the movement continues to push on, less than 50% of U.S. hospitals have yet to formally define patient experience for themselves. We still have great opportunities to educate and learn from one another.

 

This awareness made it only natural that we expand our efforts overall on the professional development of patient experience champions, furthering the work on the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge with domain outlines and the anticipated release of the domain courses in 2014. As a community you reinforced your desire and the greater need to shape this work in ways that will allow each and every one of us to grow stronger. The year ahead brings even more exciting work on this front.

 

In a recent Hospital Impact blog I mentioned my great excitement about the growth of the patient experience family overall, from new sister organizations to research entities focusing on this area, to critical gatherings in numerous places in support of this important discussion. We will continue to support and reinforce the value of all these efforts and maintain that in collaboration we all win in this movement. We remain committed to serving as a hub and connector of the many voices focused on this effort and keep our arms open for the opportunities for further collaboration.

 

This very idea led to us to begin conversations with and engage in a formal collaboration with the Society for Healthcare Consumer Advocacy (SHCA) and its 40 years of incredible history and commitment to patient voice, rights and advocacy. A strong and storied organization whose roots can be found at the very start of the patient experience movement, SHCA felt they found a home for their future with The Beryl Institute, but I would say while the container is the Institute, the home is the community of peers, of leaders and teachers, of resource providers and caregivers, of patients and families who make up this growing professional home for so many. The integration with SHCA and the purposeful collaboration with a growing number of organizations committed to this cause help reinforce the power that collaboration itself brings to this conversation.

 

I would be remiss if I did not add a personal note to this reflection on the year, that as I stood on stage to close Patient Experience Conference 2013 and received the call that I needed to rush home for the delivery of my son, I shifted abruptly from champion and advocate for a movement to a family member surround by a healthcare system still admittedly learning itself. My eyes were opened, not only by the magic of the birth of a child, but of a family member watching your loved ones cared for, your new child handled, complications managed and tense moments relieved. We must not forget we are all patients and family members and need to continue our work as such.

 

The work you do may at times seem like small gestures, part of your standard process or even done automatically as a seasoned veteran, but to a patient or family member you are providing an incredible gesture of service, of quality, of safety – of experience. In every moment we have the choice to create the experience for our patients and their families. And every moment each of you as members of this community, of this movement, have that choice as well…to engage, to learn, to contribute, and to encourage the involvement of others.

 

You see this is your community, it is built on the power of your voices, it is driven by the collaboration we find with one another and it is from that place that we look to the new year knowing that the greatest opportunities still lie ahead. Thank you for your contributions, support and leadership. May you have a healthy and happy holiday and be ready with great excitement for all the New Year will bring.

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Communication.

Tags:  Advocacy  body of knowledge  community of practice  consumer advocacy  defining patient experience  Field of Patient Experience  improving patient experience  partnership  Patient Experience  thought leadership  voice 

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The Patient Experience Must Be Owned By All: Welcoming the Society of Healthcare Consumer Advocacy

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Friday, November 22, 2013
Updated: Friday, November 22, 2013

In The Beryl Institute’s recent research report – The State of Patient Experience in American Hospitals 2013 – I noted in conclusion that the state of patient experience is growing stronger every day because of the many voices committed to this work. I too reinforced my belief that a patient experience movement is afoot, one that requires continuous and focused efforts and one that should be grounded in and built upon collaboration and alignment versus competition or the desire to stake a claim.

This idea rests at the very core of the global community of practice we have built at The Beryl Institute. We do not claim to own the patient experience, but rather to be a place where people can gather together to share what is best in what they are working to accomplish. Our philosophy has been and will remain that through collaboration not just great, but greater things can happen. 

It is in this very spirit of collaboration that I am excited to share the bridging of two great organizations to expand the alignment and dialogue on patient experience improvement. We have been in discussion with and will soon be welcoming the Society for Healthcare Consumer Advocacy (SHCA) into The Beryl Institute community. After an incredible 40 year history and supportive home with the American Hospital Association (AHA), our three organizations – The Beryl Institute, SCHA and AHA – saw great potential in supporting the next 40 years and beyond for SHCA within the Institute (You can read a letter from all of SHCA’s Past Board Presidents here). As of January 1, 2014, our communities will align to continue to expand the patient experience conversation and in doing so model the power of coming together in this critical dialogue.

More details will soon be available around this exciting next step in the history of focus on patient advocacy and more broadly patient experience improvement, but suffice it to say, the commitment to engaging all voices and growing those engaged in this important work is top of mind for us all. I am excited and proud to welcome the SHCA community to The Beryl Institute family as their new professional home and in doing so reiterate the very critical message I share here. That it is in coming together, not attempts at market distinction, in which the greatest outcomes are possible. 

I have watched in recent years as patient experience has moved from an emerging term to an active conversation at the center of policy and now financial focus. I have also seen a great game of ownership being played out. Much like one might have experienced during the gold rush, claiming their small bit of mountain stream to pan for hours, days or more in search of that one bright speck, many organizations – some well established, and some quite new – have all worked on positioning for their piece of the pie.

While I am a true believer in free enterprise and recognize the great potential for market savvy in this new world of healthcare, I also believe we have something bigger we are attempting to do in working towards patient experience excellence. It is in the bringing together of disparate thoughts or competing ideas, be they those of resource providers of similar services or healthcare organizations occupying the same market, in which the greatest outcomes can be realized. You see no one organization owns the patient experience, yet we in healthcare must all take ownership of it.

For this reason we have worked to bring the many voices together, for as I asserted above, this is where the strength of our work and its impact rests. This idea has been realized in the Institute’s Regional Roundtables where market "competitors” join together in sharing thoughts and crafting shared plans focused on improvement. It has been realized at Patient Experience Conference where numerous resource providers join in and engage in support of a true, independent community dialogue. It is seen in the willingness of some of the largest players in experience measurement to come together to share ideas between the covers of our soon to be released paper on the Voices of Measurement.

If we are to make the greatest differences in the lives of our patients, families, peers and community we must be open to the idea that above all else through collaboration and coordinated effort profound possibility exists for improvement and sustained impact. And while by my very words, I cannot claim The Beryl Institute is the only place this can or will be done, I do hope and in fact commit that we will continue to stand for the bringing together of all ideas, of every voice and of each hope in each and everything we do. As a community of practice it is our calling, at The Beryl Institute it is our cause and we are so very excited to see (and hopefully be a catalyst in) the patient experience family continuing to grow.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  Advocacy  AHA  body of knowledge  choice  community of practice  consumer advocacy  Continuum of Care  Field of Patient Experience  global healthcare  healthcare  Interactions  Leadership  patient advocac  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  perception  SHCA  thought leadership  voice 

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Involvement is the Path to Patient Experience Excellence

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, August 6, 2013
Updated: Tuesday, August 6, 2013

The words of the day in healthcare of late, especially in light of the policy undertones influencing the system in the U.S., are around engagement and activation, especially of patients, but also focused on staff, physicians and community. Studies show that activated patients are more apt to have greater patient experiences (When Seeing the Same Physician, Highly Activated Patients Have Better Care Experiences Than Less Activated Patients, Health Affairs, July 2013 32(7):1295–1305) and the e-patient revolution is well underway as exemplified by such organizations as the Society for Participatory Medicine.Papers espouse the power of staff engagement as the means to better experience (The Role of Organization Culture in a Positive Patient Experience, The Beryl Institute, 2012) and community engagement is reflected by growing involvement in strategic efforts such as what I experienced at the William Osler Health System in Brampton, Ontario, Canada.

While these ideas are external efforts that influence specific organizational strategies and associated actions, I was struck with the recognition this too is what we have worked to model via The Beryl Institute ourselves. As a global community of practice, we have been clear in declaring a mission to create a dynamic space for members to convene, engage and contribute to elevating, expanding and enriching the global dialogue on improving the patient experience.

In just the last two weeks we held the very first call for our Global Patient and Family Advisory Council (GPFAC), an incredible group of patients and family members committed to serving in ensuring patient and family voice is part of the patient experience movement. Their generosity of spirit and commitment to this cause left me inspired and excited for all we still have to do in our efforts to improve experience. We also met with our Patient Experience Advisory Board for their quarterly call to review our direction and strategy as an Institute and ensure we are meeting the needs of those on the front lines addressing the patient experience every day. In that conversation I was moved by the excitement and commitment to the movement we all support. It is through the generosity and spirit of these two groups, and also the continued contributions of members and guests via On the Road visits, sharing case studies, and through a record number of Patient Experience Conference speaking submissions, as just a few examples, that the sense of involvement was palpable.

Involvement, you could argue is a play on all these words: engaged, activated or even participatory. I do not want to play the semantics game, but for sake of discussion, one can be engaged or even "activated” without a true bias for action, they can simply serve as states of "being”, not doing. Perhaps this is why the Gallup Organization uses the term "actively engaged” to reinforce their measures of a highly engaged workforce. Participation, more so, suggests action, as it requires the individual to be doing something. Involvement continues to expand that reason, from one of a state of being to one of acting. In fact one definition of involvement I saw encompassed these very terms (parenthetical comments are my own): to engage (an action) as a participant (an active contributor).

The takeaway for me here is simple, as we have seen in countless organizational visits, cases and presentations, as we have uncovered in research efforts and benchmarking studies and perhaps most importantly what we have experienced in our very organization is that not only does involvement matter, it has significant influence on what can be achieved, how it is achieved and how quickly it can be achieved. An unassuming word on its own, involvement, may provide a profoundly important key to success in a healthcare world now intently focused on the improvement of the experience of all, patients, family members, community and caregivers. I believe that involvement is a fundamental component of any path to patient experience success. The question that now remains is how involved are you in your efforts and how willing are you to involve others in your success? I also strongly invite you to get involved in the patient experience movement and The Beryl Institute. We all still have significant and exciting work ahead!

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Coaching and Developing Others.

Tags:  community of practice  culture  employee engagement  healthcare  improving patient experience  patient  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  service excellence  thought leadership 

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You are the Patient Experience: A Reflection

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, April 2, 2013
Updated: Tuesday, April 2, 2013

In just two weeks, hundreds of healthcare leaders, resource providers, patients and family members from around the world will gather together at Patient Experience Conference 2013. This annual gathering continues to amaze me, for while I get to take part in the organization and preparation with an incredible team of planners and volunteers, what happens during these days together is still, in many ways, a surprise.

Why is that, you ask? It comes down to a simple philosophy we work hard to ensure permeates our community at The Beryl Institute each and every day. With as many resources as we continue to provide – from papers, to case studies, On the Road visits to research – and our commitment to be the global community of practice and premier thought leader on improving the patient experience, we fundamentally believe the greatest power in our community is the connection and sharing with one another. That is what makes the annual gathering of patient experience leaders so powerful; it is grounded in the learning from and connection with one another and provides a new level of support for what many can feel at times may be a very lonely and challenging adventure.

No one person, organization, provider or vendor "owns” the patient experience and they should not claim to; rather it is ALL of the people who live it, struggle with it, work to improve and yes experience it every day, who do. It is you who truly are keepers of this movement. You are the patient experience. I see our job to create the space for this to happen, provide the information from which you can learn and fundamentally encourage the connections that will help all of us ultimately improve.

In my March Patient Experience Blog, Why Community Matters in Improving Patient Experience, I suggested, "…to provide a true experience, you must think well beyond the physical nature of your facilities or practices to recognize that experience resides in the network of people that surround and are connected to your organization, both near and far.” I would suggest that in the call to action to address the patient experience we remember this fundamental point. This is what also has me encourage people to get engaged, be part of the community, contribute and learn from one another. It is why at the Institute we have launched our Voices of the Patient Experience series to start this year from the perspective of executives, the front line, healthcare students and patients and family members and why we are ensuring patients and family members can participate in Conference 2013 (#patientsincluded).

I also share these thoughts with a new perspective on this passion, from that of a patient and family member myself. Personal experience has led me to spend time (and as someone committed to patient experience, observe the experience) in an emergency department and primary care setting, and has blessed me with the chance to encounter the preparation and expectation setting that happens with both physician and hospital in anticipating the arrival of your first child. These personal encounters have reminded me that each and every one of us committed to this work are also (or will be) that patient or family member.

I share all of this to reiterate my central point, if we are committed to improving patient experience, to ensuring all voices are heard, to providing the best in quality, safety and service, then the opportunity we have and must take advantage of is to tackle this not alone, but as a true global community. Whether in person at Patient Experience Conference, on a call or via an electronic network, the impact that we can have is only heightened through our connections. I encourage your engagement and I urge your sharing. This is an effort worth every moment we spend. I most look forward to all that will still emerge as a surprise!

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  community of practice  global healthcare  healthcare  improving patient experience  Leadership  networking  patient  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  team  thought leadership  voice 

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Creating a Field of Patient Experience – A Call to Action

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, May 8, 2012
Updated: Monday, May 7, 2012

Something powerful took place at this year’s Patient Experience Conference and it took some time in reflection for me to sort it out. We opened the conference with the powerful video "I am the Patient Experience” showing the faces of the many individuals key to the Patient Experience. We then reviewed the efforts underway to create a Body of Knowledge, shaping a model for ongoing development of patient experience leaders, and the potential for formal certification. The days together were filled with the connections and learning central to the vision of The Beryl Institute (see the pictures and review the lessons learned).

It culminated with our closing speaker, Tiffany Christensen who brought us the voice of the patient and suggested something profound. She noted that our work in patient experience is truly a movement. In fact, what we are doing together is shaping a field. As the faces of participants declaring "I am the Patient Experience” flashed on the screen to close the time together, it was evident something bigger was happening than a conference or even the growth of a global community of practice.

Captured in the energy and spirit that filled those three days in April, was the same commitment and possibility that was shared by the over 300 individuals from 8 countries that have contributed to framing the 15 domains in the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge or even the over 8,000 members and guests that engage with the Institute community every month. The Body of Knowledge now stands for something bigger than just things we "need to know” to be effective practitioners in patient experience. It represents the foundation of a field grounded in knowledge and experience that can have lasting and profound impact on how those in healthcare work and how patients and families are ultimately cared for.

Creating a field is no small task and will not emerge from any one individual or organization. It must result from the voices of many, which is why I encourage your continued involvement in the Body of Knowledge effort. At The Beryl Institute, we look to be the catalyst, convener and coordinator of this important work. The next steps in the process will be the creation of work teams that will outline the key content for each of the domains of knowledge. Together with respected subject matter experts these outlines will help shape the learning needed to sharpen the skills of current practitioners and create a path to develop future leaders for the field. I invite you to learn more about the process and consider contributing to the work of these teams

I mentioned in a recent Hospital Impact blog that patient experience is not a fad, but is now a critical component of healthcare overall. We must work together to solidify the knowledge needed to lead, continue to support the research that will stretch our ideas and practice and come together as a global community that will take a stand for what we know is right in ensuring the best of experiences for our patients and their families. If we do this with the passion that I saw during our three days together at Patient Experience Conference 2012, there is no doubt that what we are doing is truly creating a field of patient experience.

Jason A. Wolf
Executive Director
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  body of knowledge  culture  Field of Patient Experience  improving patient experience  Interaction  open comment period  patient  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  thought leadership  Tiffany Christensen 

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Creating a Body of Knowledge for Patient Experience Leaders

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, March 6, 2012
Updated: Tuesday, March 6, 2012
In The Beryl Institute paper, "The Four Cornerstones of Patient Experience”, we discovered that when organizations choose to have a leader with committed time to guide patient experience efforts, those organizations outperform their peers in both HCAHPS performance as well as patient satisfaction results. Finding that intentional focus on an issue leads to better results is not surprising, but it is important to note that a focused individual made the difference.

This led us to ask, if we can show that having an identified patient experience leader is a critical component of success, and specifically in driving measures that have service, quality and financial implications for healthcare organizations, can we define what it is that this individual does?

We started with a small steering team of healthcare professionals from hospitals and organizations across the United States on a mind-mapping exercise to identify key areas of knowledge critical to patient experience leaders. This exercise led to the development of domains that started to frame a core body of knowledge. Job descriptions were explored from roles around the world, competency models were examined from related fields and organizations, and then broader input was sought engaging patient experience and healthcare leaders from the US, the UK, Australia and Canada. The feedback led to hundreds of pages of thoughts on the critical nature and true complexity of patient experience and of the knowledge needed to effectively address it.

The discovery was powerful; a body of knowledge for patient experience leaders that began to shape an identifiable field of practice. It also brought greater clarity to the findings in the "Four Cornerstones” paper. While a focused individual was critical, this alone would not drive patient experience success. Rather an individual needs the skill set and "know-how” to truly impact this central component of the healthcare world.

That leads us to today, where the input and work of over one hundred volunteer leaders and contributors provides an initial framework to explore and a new possibility for shaping the field of patient experience. On Monday, March 5 we unveiled the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge and the 14 domains of knowledge key to an effective patient experience leader. With all the work that has led to this point, it is now that a much broader conversation gets underway.

We invite individuals from all corners of the healthcare system, including patient experience practitioners, healthcare leaders and staff, physicians, patients, families and community members to contribute their voices to the process. For the next 6 weeks, through Monday, April 16, we will be gathering your input to further polish this work. We will share the results of this effort to start Patient Experience Conference 2012. At The Beryl Institute, we believe the patient experience is about every player in the healthcare process and should encompass the voices of all those it impacts.

In healthcare, experience is truly central to all we do. The opportunity to provide a framework for the important work taking place every day in healthcare organizations is a critical global dialogue. I invite and encourage you to join the conversation.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
Executive Director
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  body of knowledge  certification  community of practice  culture  defining patient experience  improving patient experience  leadership  open comment period  Patient Experience  service excellence  thought leadership 

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