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The Beryl Institute Patient Experience Blog
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Do You See What I See?

Posted By Tiffany Christensen, Monday, December 4, 2017
Updated: Monday, December 4, 2017

As a person who lives with cystic fibrosis and has had 2 double lung transplants, I have experienced many stages of illness. I have understood from a very young age that having this illness is something people feel badly about and sometimes even wonder why “bad things happen to good people.”

But what if we have it wrong? What if illness isn’t the worst-case scenario? What if instead of looking at me with pity, I should be looking at you with pity because you don’t see what I see?

In my lifelong career as a patient, I have had people respond to me in all kinds of ways. The reactions were more pronounced as I grew sicker and they reached their peak during the time I wore oxygen. When I was wearing oxygen, some people would stare, some people would look away and others would approach me and say things that often caught me off guard. One man in Target said, “You shouldn’t have smoked so much.” One woman in Macy’s said, “I’ll pray for you.” My cousin asked, “Why would God do this to you?” Almost all of the people I encountered said—with their eyes— “You poor thing, I’m so glad I’m not you.”

While the intentions were almost always good and the reactions easily explained as a reflection of each person’s internal relationship with life, death and uncertainty, none of them ever hit the mark.  Nobody I came across ever reflected back to me what my perception of myself happened to be.

I felt physically weak, yes, but everything else about me felt strong. I felt connected to the universe, I felt a strong understanding of my purpose in this world and I felt lucky to have the lessons of illness laid before my feet day after day. The very last thing I wanted was pity. If anything, I would have liked admiration.

Imagine for a moment a patient laying in a hospital bed. They are curled up slightly around themselves, pale in the face and not very interested in interaction. Imagine walking in to see that patient. What might you think? What words come to mind? Vulnerable? Sad? Weak?

Now imagine walking into that same room with a very different lens. If you could see into that person’s mind, what do you think you would find there? Simply because they are not talking does not mean they aren’t thinking. Just because they aren’t emoting does not mean they aren’t feeling. So why are they so quiet? What are they doing?

They are enduring. They are bracing themselves against pain or discomfort. This takes energy and concentration. This takes a great deal of STRENGTH.

What if, like a marathon runner grimacing as they finish their final miles, we looked at the patient curled up in the bed and did not see weakness but, instead, saw determination and grit? What if we encouraged them, like we would do on the sidelines watching athletes riding their bikes in an Iron Man, telling them “You’re doing great! I know it’s hard but you’re amazing!” What if we stopped pitying people who are sick and saw them as people we could learn great lessons from? How would this change the way we deliver our healthcare?

Being sick is often an isolating experience. Not only because of the physical symptoms that limit our ability to live an active life, but because of the perception of weakness others project onto us. As I shared earlier in this post, during the time that I wore oxygen, I had a lot of comments from friends, family and strangers about my appearance of health. What I almost never received were questions. I longed for questions rather than statements. Here are just a few that I would have liked to hear:

  • “I know you have bad days and better days. On a scale of 1 to 10, what’s today?”
  • “Is there something I could do right now to make your life a little easier?”
  • “I want to support you and I’ve never experienced anything like what you are going through. Can you help me understand what life is like for you?”
  • “You know I love you and I worry about you, but I’m feeling strong today. Is there anything you want to talk about that you’ve been keeping inside because you were afraid it would be too hard for me to talk about?”

And then there is this one statement I longed to hear:

  • “Caring for you while you go through this illness is really hard. Sometimes I get sad, angry…you name it. But, I want you to know, I wouldn’t trade it for the world. Having you is worth every second of this struggle.”

The internal world of sick people isn’t always going to match mine so this is by no means a prescription. At the same time, nothing bad can come from seeing patients differently. If you see them as strong, perhaps they will gain more strength. If you ask them questions, they may not always want to talk about it in that moment, but they know where to go when they do.

Illness forces us to focus on what matters in this life. Let those who live with it be our teachers while we admire them as they take on their personal marathon. I hope you can begin to see what I see and watch how it shapes the way we deliver care.

 

Tiffany Christensen
Vice President, Experience Innovation
The Beryl Institute

Planning to attend the IHI National Forum later this month? Join Tiffany Christensen’s Keynote session with Dr. Rana Awdish, MD, lead by IHI President Derek Feeley, as the two women touch on how they are using their patient experiences to improve healthcare. You can also join Tiffany during Sunday’s Learning Lab, the CEO Summit and her “meet the author” luncheon. 

Tags:  communication  impact  improving patient experience  perception  purpose  relational healthcare 

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When the Patient Experience becomes more Personal

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Wednesday, March 2, 2016

We have an incredibly passionate community at The Beryl Institute. I know for many that passion has been fueled by personal experiences that drove them to be part of this work. Others have been inspired to join the patient experience movement to spread what they believe is the right thing to do for those we serve. And sometimes while doing this work they have encountered their own life experiences, whether small bumps in the road or larger life-changing events, that reinforced the importance of patient experience and provided new perspective to guide their efforts.

Last year I experienced this firsthand when my daughter, Maya, dislocated and fractured her elbow while cheerleading. She had an emergency reduction surgery the night of the accident to put her elbow back in place and a second surgery a few days later to insert a screw to correct the fracture. All went well, but they decided to keep her overnight to help control her pain and that one night provided an incredible opportunity for reflection and perspective for me as a person who has built a career in patient experience. 

While I work everyday to share stories and practices of how our community works to improve the healthcare experience, I’ve been fortunate to have very few patient or family experiences myself. It’s amazing how your perspective intensifies when you’re sitting inside a hospital room observing the care of a loved one.

A few ideas were reinforced for me that night and, as simple as they are, I believe they are important considerations as we address overall experience.

  • Patients (and those who love and care for them) are incredibly vulnerable in a healthcare setting. Maya and I are pretty confident in our regular routines, but we were a bit clueless at the hospital – even with simple things such as ordering meals and turning on the TV. More significantly, we were at the hands of the staff to know what medicines she should have, if her body was reacting as it should to the surgery and how to best control the pain. We had to trust the healthcare team. As a children’s hospital, I must acknowledge they had several things in place that helped Maya feel more comfortable. Volunteers brought her a stuffed lamb and they let her select from a fun collection of super soft blankets to use while there that she could also take home. The hospital even had a Build-a-Bear Workshop on site, which I believe was the key motivator in getting her walking around post-surgery. Any steps, however large or small, an organization can to take to comfort and ease the feeling of vulnerability can have a significant impact.  
  • Healthcare workers are human. I think people often place doctors and nurses on pedestals in their minds assuming they should have perfect accuracy, bedside manners and responsiveness. While Maya had some great people caring for her, I was quickly reminded they were human. They had varied levels of experience, focus and relationship skills. As humans they also had their own lives that did have an impact on how they cared for my daughter – maybe stresses at home, conflict with co-workers or even their own health challenges. Regardless of how dedicated and professional, humans make mistakes. I came to appreciate all the checks and balances they implemented to help prevent that. At first I was a little disturbed by the redundant questions like “What is your name? Birthday? Any allergies?” But as I reminded myself the staff were each caring for multiple patients, I learned to appreciate their diligence to make sure everything matched up. I encourage healthcare workers to explain the needs for these steps to patients as this goes a long way in giving them confidence in their healthcare team.
  • Patients need advocates. The vulnerability and realization that the staff treating Maya were human reinforced a point that sometimes gets overlooked in healthcare – the important role of the caregiver. A few years ago a co-worker’s husband was in the hospital and she refused to leave his side. As much as she respected the healthcare team caring for him, she realized no one had his best interest at heart as much as she did. She was there to be sure they gave him the right medicines, at the right times and in the right amounts. She kept a journal of his condition and symptoms to share with the doctor, and she was there to be sure he ate, had food choices he liked and any assistance he needed. After being in the hospital with Maya for just one night, I understood her point completely, and not just because Maya was 11. The caregiver can play a vital role in helping ensure quality, safety and experience are what they should be in all care settings.

Maya was lucky that her hospital stay was short and she was quickly on the road to recovery. Being with her that night enriched my perspective and purpose, both as a mom caring for a child and as a professional committed to help make the healthcare experience the best it can be for everyone.

We are currently working on a white paper at the Institute that will share the stories of many patient experience leaders who, in the face of a personal health experience – however large or small, shifted their perspective from PX leader to patient or patient’s family member. If you are willing to share your story, we encourage you to participate in this project. 

Stacy Palmer
Vice President, Strategy and Member Experience
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  choice  community  engagement  Field of Patient Experience  improving patient experience  patient  patient and family  patient engagement  Patient Experience  perception  service excellence  voice 

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The Patient Experience Must Be Owned By All: Welcoming the Society of Healthcare Consumer Advocacy

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Friday, November 22, 2013
Updated: Friday, November 22, 2013

In The Beryl Institute’s recent research report – The State of Patient Experience in American Hospitals 2013 – I noted in conclusion that the state of patient experience is growing stronger every day because of the many voices committed to this work. I too reinforced my belief that a patient experience movement is afoot, one that requires continuous and focused efforts and one that should be grounded in and built upon collaboration and alignment versus competition or the desire to stake a claim.

This idea rests at the very core of the global community of practice we have built at The Beryl Institute. We do not claim to own the patient experience, but rather to be a place where people can gather together to share what is best in what they are working to accomplish. Our philosophy has been and will remain that through collaboration not just great, but greater things can happen. 

It is in this very spirit of collaboration that I am excited to share the bridging of two great organizations to expand the alignment and dialogue on patient experience improvement. We have been in discussion with and will soon be welcoming the Society for Healthcare Consumer Advocacy (SHCA) into The Beryl Institute community. After an incredible 40 year history and supportive home with the American Hospital Association (AHA), our three organizations – The Beryl Institute, SCHA and AHA – saw great potential in supporting the next 40 years and beyond for SHCA within the Institute (You can read a letter from all of SHCA’s Past Board Presidents here). As of January 1, 2014, our communities will align to continue to expand the patient experience conversation and in doing so model the power of coming together in this critical dialogue.

More details will soon be available around this exciting next step in the history of focus on patient advocacy and more broadly patient experience improvement, but suffice it to say, the commitment to engaging all voices and growing those engaged in this important work is top of mind for us all. I am excited and proud to welcome the SHCA community to The Beryl Institute family as their new professional home and in doing so reiterate the very critical message I share here. That it is in coming together, not attempts at market distinction, in which the greatest outcomes are possible. 

I have watched in recent years as patient experience has moved from an emerging term to an active conversation at the center of policy and now financial focus. I have also seen a great game of ownership being played out. Much like one might have experienced during the gold rush, claiming their small bit of mountain stream to pan for hours, days or more in search of that one bright speck, many organizations – some well established, and some quite new – have all worked on positioning for their piece of the pie.

While I am a true believer in free enterprise and recognize the great potential for market savvy in this new world of healthcare, I also believe we have something bigger we are attempting to do in working towards patient experience excellence. It is in the bringing together of disparate thoughts or competing ideas, be they those of resource providers of similar services or healthcare organizations occupying the same market, in which the greatest outcomes can be realized. You see no one organization owns the patient experience, yet we in healthcare must all take ownership of it.

For this reason we have worked to bring the many voices together, for as I asserted above, this is where the strength of our work and its impact rests. This idea has been realized in the Institute’s Regional Roundtables where market "competitors” join together in sharing thoughts and crafting shared plans focused on improvement. It has been realized at Patient Experience Conference where numerous resource providers join in and engage in support of a true, independent community dialogue. It is seen in the willingness of some of the largest players in experience measurement to come together to share ideas between the covers of our soon to be released paper on the Voices of Measurement.

If we are to make the greatest differences in the lives of our patients, families, peers and community we must be open to the idea that above all else through collaboration and coordinated effort profound possibility exists for improvement and sustained impact. And while by my very words, I cannot claim The Beryl Institute is the only place this can or will be done, I do hope and in fact commit that we will continue to stand for the bringing together of all ideas, of every voice and of each hope in each and everything we do. As a community of practice it is our calling, at The Beryl Institute it is our cause and we are so very excited to see (and hopefully be a catalyst in) the patient experience family continuing to grow.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  Advocacy  AHA  body of knowledge  choice  community of practice  consumer advocacy  Continuum of Care  Field of Patient Experience  global healthcare  healthcare  Interactions  Leadership  patient advocac  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  perception  SHCA  thought leadership  voice 

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Patient Experience is About More than Making Patients Happy

Posted By Deanna Frings, Tuesday, May 7, 2013
Updated: Tuesday, May 7, 2013

My dearest friend recently received news that her breast cancer is back after 11 years of remission. She struggles daily with eating enough to maintain a healthy weight, feeling strong and motivated enough to walk in the pool to build her strength, and to find relief from the constant pain. I’m not sure the word happy is in her vocabulary these days. But expressions of gratitude, a decrease in her anxiety, and a feeling of comfort are certainly emotions she has experienced when interacting with her healthcare team.

During the past several years in my various roles leading patient experience efforts, I have had frequent conversations with physicians, leaders, and clinical staff about what patient experience is, what it’s not and why these efforts are so important.

Some physicians express frustration about measuring patient satisfaction. After all, "It’s impossible to make every patient happy, why are we spending so much time and money sending surveys?” I have also experienced hospital administrators share their belief that if staff would just be nicer to people, the scores would improve. And, I have witnessed nurses and other clinical staff push back on patient experience activities saying, "We are not Disney, we are not here to make sure people have a good time, we are here to take care of patients.”

As I think about the evolution of the Patient Experience (PX) movement, I understand these various viewpoints. My PX journey began when the organization I worked for hired a consultant to teach the importance of customer service. After about 18 months, this turned into an initiative called "Service Excellence: Our Values in Action”. We continued on this journey for 5-8 years and recently the language and movement changed to what we know today as Patient Experience. I fully embraced this change, as it is a demonstration of applying our ongoing learning of what PX is really all about.

I don’t believe the goal of delivering the best to the patient and their families should be framed within the context of making them happy. I don’t believe patients give us the gift of their feedback, respond to a survey or write a heartfelt note because people simply made them happy. I believe it’s about so much more.

I tell physicians that patient satisfaction surveys do not measure patient happiness, but they can determine whether you listened with a compassionate ear as they expressed their concerns and worries.

I vividly recall reading a letter from the niece of a patient after her uncle died. She expressed her deepest gratitude not only for the care and compassion her uncle received but also for the care and comfort she received at a most difficult time in her life. The letter she wrote focused on the nurse who called to inform her that her uncle passed away in the middle of the night. This nurse went on to explain that he did not die alone. Hearing this brought instant comfort to the niece. Was she expressing happiness in her letter? Of course not. Rather, she was thanking this nurse for the compassionate way in which she shared this difficult news.

I’m not saying that in healthcare we should not be nice to people or that those simple courtesies are not important parts of the way we deliver care. What I am saying is that we must reach higher, go deeper, and deliver care in the most compassionate way. That is why I fully embrace the next evolution in our PX journey.

Fred Lee talks about this in his three levels of care framework. Wendy Leebov’s works with clinicians building their skill in compassionate communications and Colleen Sweeneyraises awareness in patient’s biggest healthcare fears in her Empathy Project.

Hospitals, clinics, outpatient centers etc, do not have the same goals as Disney. We must look beyond the happiness factor. We must comfort, care, listen and convey compassion in every interaction. That is what the patient experience is all about and why I’m more than happyto listen to what our patients have to say about their healthcare experience.

Deanna LW Frings
Director, Education & Professional Development
The Beryl Institute

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Patient & Family Centeredness.

Tags:  choice  defining patient experience  Field of Patient Experience  global defining patient experience  HCAHPS  improving patient experience  Patient Experience  perception  service excellence  storytelling  value-based purchasing 

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Patient Experience: A Global Opportunity and a Local Solution

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, December 4, 2012
Updated: Tuesday, December 4, 2012

Last week we held the second call of the new Global Patient Experience Network supported by The Beryl Institute. The call included Institute members from eight countries and spread across 18 time zones. Despite our differences in location, time of day, native language or accent, when the conversation started, we discovered that the concepts at the core of improving patient experience are fundamentally the same. Providing the best in experience for patients, families and the communities (and countries) we serve is an unwavering focus for people across healthcare systems and functions around the world.

As I listened to the conversation and we dug deeper in identifying what posed the greatest challenges and offered significant opportunities for improving patient experience, I was struck by the recognition (and even relief) that participants showed in how similar their issues were. One participant offered, "It’s comforting to know we are all contending with the same challenges and questions moving forward,” with a second individual noting, "It is amazing that at the end of the day we are all working towards the same end and facing the same issues.” This realization drew agreement and raised the excitement of the group in understanding that even with great distances between us, there are great similarities and therefore possibilities.

The group identified the same top issues central to patient experience efforts that I have seen in my travels. They included:
  • The importance of organization culture and our ability to manage change in today’s healthcare environment
  • The understanding and effective implementation of patient (and team) interaction processes from patient, physician and staff engagement and involvement to service recovery, post care follow-up and building consumer loyalty
  • The implications of measuring our patient experience efforts to gauge perception and understand the impact of each effort
  • The value of the structure of patient experience practice itself, ensuring a clear focus, supportive leadership, aligned roles and right structures to deliver on the best experience possible

While these are not the extent of the issues faced in addressing patient experience, it was evident that among peers separated by great distance, they still had closely knit similarities. This was especially significant for our team at the Institute as we have always approached our work from the belief that while systems may operate differently and policies might be distinct, the very fundamentals that drive a positive patient experience – the power of interactions, the importance of culture, the reality that perceptions matter and the realization that experience covers the continuum of care – as framed by the definition of patient experience, continues to hold true.

With this great commonality and the excitement generated in the discussion, it was also evident that our members recognized that patient experience is a local, dare I say personal effort. Each and every individual that plays a role along the care continuum has some level of responsibility. It is based on the sum of all interactions, as we suggest, that a patient and their family members gauge their own experience. Therefore in building a patient experience effort, it requires an understanding of your own organization, the people that comprise it, and the community (and demographics) that you serve. Patient experience success is not driven by a one model fits all solution, it is and forever should be something that meets the need of your organization and your patients whether in San Diego or Sydney, New York or New Delhi. Ultimately, patient experience is a global issue, but it is and will continue to be up to each of us locally to bring these grand ideas, the critical practices, and the day-to-day needs to life in every encounter. There is a great opportunity we have been given to move beyond policy to true cause, beyond process to effective practice and beyond "have tos” to "always dos”, that will impact the lives of patients and families globally. I have always suggested it is a choice…I maintain that and hope it is part of all our resolutions for positive and healthy New Year!

In reflecting on the launch of the Global Network and other Institute efforts in 2012, it is clear that this has been an amazing year for our growing global community, with now over 11,000 members and guests in 28 countries focused on improving the patient experience. We have all committed to something noble and important, the best possible experience and the health and well being for our fellow man. And we have been given a great opportunity, to turn a global need into something each and every one of us can impact directly. Happy Holidays to you all and I look forward to continuing to learn and grow together in the year ahead.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
Executive Director
The Beryl Institute

Related Body of Knowledge courses: History.

Tags:  choice  culture  employee engagement  global defining patient experience  global healthcare  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  patient engagement  Patient Experience  perception  service recovery 

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7 Steps to Accountability: A Key Ingredient in Improving Patient Experience

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, October 2, 2012
Updated: Monday, October 1, 2012

As I continue to visit healthcare organizations and engage with leaders globally there are clear emerging trends at the heart of effective efforts to address the patient and family experience. In my recent series of blogs I suggest we must recognize the implications of patient perceptions as a focus of our patient experience efforts. I support this by reinforcing that culture is a critical choice for organizations to consider in terms of how they look to shape those perceptions. In fact we cannot overlook the centrality of culture to the very definition of patient experience overall. I add that it is on a strong cultural foundation that we can then ensure a sense of engagement for our staff and patients.

The missing piece in this important dialogue is that of building a foundation of accountability in our healthcare organizations. It has been identified as a top issue for healthcare leaders during my On the Road visits and at our Regional Roundtable gatherings. In looking at all the suggested paths and plans to accountability some general themes emerge.

Building a basis for accountability in organizations requires a number of committed actions. Without these organizations run the risk of falling short on their defined patient experience objectives. They include:

1. Establish focused standards/expectations – Determine and clearly define what you expect in behaviors and actions as you create a culture of accountability.

2. Set clear consequences for inaction and rewards and recognition for action – Be willing to reinforce expectations consistently and use as opportunities for learning.

3. Provide learning opportunities to understand and see expectations in action – Ensure staff at all levels are clear on expected behaviors and consequences.

4. Communicate expectations, reinforcing what and why consistently and continuously– Keep expectations top of mind and be clear that these are part of who you are as an organization in every encounter.

5. Observe and evaluate staff at all levels providing feedback and/or coaching as needed – Turn actual encounters, good or bad, into learning moments and opportunities to ensure people are clear on expected behaviors and actions.

6. Execute on consequences immediately and thoughtfully – Respond rapidly when people miss the mark (or when people excel) to ensure people are aware of the importance of your expectations.

7. Revisit expectations often to ensure they meet the needs and objectives of the organization – Remember standard and expectations are dynamic and change with your organization’s needs. They must stay in tune with who you are as an organization (your values) and where you intend to go (your vision).

Accountability has been tossed around more and more in conversations today in healthcare organizations as something that leaders want to see more of. The reality is that accountability is not just something you simply expect and it just miraculously appears, it is something you must intentionally create expectations for and reinforce. As with patient experience itself, accountability needs a plan in order to ensure effective execution.

I often speak of patient experience efforts as a choice; one that requires rigorous work. This is overcoming something I call the performance paradox, which helps us recognize that many things we see as simple, clear and understandable are not always easy, trouble-free and painless to do. Yet I would suggest we have no other choice. As a positive patient experience is something we owe to our patients and their families in our healthcare settings, creating and sustaining a culture of accountability is something we actually owe to our staff in supporting their ability to create unparalleled experience.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
Executive Director
The Beryl Institute

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Coaching and Developing Others.

Tags:  accountability  choice  culture  defining patient experience  employee engagement  HCAHPS  improving patient experience  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  perception  Regional Roundtable  service excellence 

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7 Steps to Accountability: A Key Ingredient in Improving Patient Experience

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, October 2, 2012
Updated: Monday, October 1, 2012

As I continue to visit healthcare organizations and engage with leaders globally there are clear emerging trends at the heart of effective efforts to address the patient and family experience. In my recent series of blogs I suggest we must recognize the implications of patient perceptions as a focus of our patient experience efforts. I support this by reinforcing that culture is a critical choice for organizations to consider in terms of how they look to shape those perceptions. In fact we cannot overlook the centrality of culture to the very definition of patient experience overall. I add that it is on a strong cultural foundation that we can then ensure a sense of engagement for our staff and patients.

The missing piece in this important dialogue is that of building a foundation of accountability in our healthcare organizations. It has been identified as a top issue for healthcare leaders during my On the Road visits and at our Regional Roundtable gatherings. In looking at all the suggested paths and plans to accountability some general themes emerge.

Building a basis for accountability in organizations requires a number of committed actions. Without these organizations run the risk of falling short on their defined patient experience objectives. They include:

  1. Establish focused standards/expectations – Determine and clearly define what you expect in behaviors and actions as you create a culture of accountability.
  2. Set clear consequences for inaction and rewards and recognition for action – Be willing to reinforce expectations consistently and use as opportunities for learning.
  3. Provide learning opportunities to understand and see expectations in action – Ensure staff at all levels are clear on expected behaviors and consequences.
  4. Communicate expectations, reinforcing what and why consistently and continuously – Keep expectations top of mind and be clear that these are part of who you are as an organization in every encounter.
  5. Observe and evaluate staff at all levels providing feedback and/or coaching as needed – Turn actual encounters, good or bad, into learning moments and opportunities to ensure people are clear on expected behaviors and actions.
  6. Execute on consequences immediately and thoughtfully – Respond rapidly when people miss the mark (or when people excel) to ensure people are aware of the importance of your expectations.
  7. Revisit expectations often to ensure they meet the needs and objectives of the organization – Remember standard/expectations are dynamic and change with your organization’s needs. They must stay in tune with who you are as an organization (your values) and where you intend to go (your vision).

Accountability has been tossed around more and more in conversations today in healthcare organizations as something that leaders want to see more of. The reality is that accountability is not just something you simply expect and it just miraculously appears, it is something you must intentionally create expectations for and reinforce. As with patient experience itself, accountability needs a plan in order to ensure effective execution.

I often speak of patient experience efforts as a choice; one that requires rigorous work. This is overcoming something I call the performance paradox, which helps us recognize that many things we see as simple, clear and understandable are not always easy, trouble-free and painless to do. Yet I would suggest we have no other choice. As a positive patient experience is something we owe to our patients and their families in our healthcare settings, creating and sustaining a culture of accountability is something we actually owe to our staff in supporting their ability to create unparalleled experience.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.

Tags:  accountability  choice  culture  defining patient experience  employee engagement  HCAHPS  improving patient experience  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  perception  Regional Roundtable  service excellence 

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