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The Beryl Institute Patient Experience Blog
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The Practice of Experience: A Relentless Pursuit of the Truth

Posted By Tifffany Christensen, Wednesday, September 5, 2018

As a CF/lung transplant patient turned Patient/Family Advisor (PFA), I have been on the frontlines of the evolution of Patient Experience strategies since 2005. I fell in love with PFACs and have been thrilled to see the ways in which we partner with patients and families grow more sophisticated over time. Today, we have patients and families working directly in clinical quality improvement, sitting at the board level and rounding on patients actively receiving care. It’s both inspiring to see the changes and frustrating to see how far we have to go to achieve genuine partnerships across the continuum of care.

After working as a patient advocate, I became a specialist in Patient and Family Engagement (PFE) “best practices.” Working with healthcare organizations to improve bedside engagement and community engagement proved challenging for multiple reasons. I hunkered down on the best practices, sought out additional strategies and remained steadfast in the belief that the right strategy would improve engagement and, ultimately, experience.

One day, I was on an oncology unit trying to determine how well the clinicians communicated with their patients.  I was rounding from room to room, asking patients questions. To me, the questions were both simple and very important to my understanding of the patient experience:

  • “When your doctor came in this morning, did you understand everything he told you?”
  • "After morning rounds, were you left with any questions that didn’t get answered?”
  • “When you call for a nurse, how quickly do they typically come to your room?” 

These were simple questions directed at what we care about in improving experience: clear/respectful communication and a timely response to needs. I thought I was doing a great job with my questions but the answers I kept getting were not what I expected, wanted or needed. Instead of telling me about the communication and timeliness of responding to call bells, patients were telling me about the pain in their side that was worrisome. Spouses told me long stories about getting the patient to the ED before being admitted. Universally, my questions were not being answered at all, no matter how many times I asked them or how I was able to rephrase. I wasn’t getting what I came for, but I was seeing what I had become.

In healthcare, there is a need to focus on improvement and standardization. I began to wonder, “Is it possible that I have ‘systematized’ my work in Experience to such a degree that it has become a series of strategies rather than an exploration of the ACTUAL experience?” The answer, for me, was ‘yes.’ My next question; “Am I working on strategies without a clear understanding of what matters most to those living the actual experience?” Again, the answer, for me, was ‘yes.’ I had become so deeply invested in “moving the needle” around improving the patient experience that I was no longer looking at the experience at all. Or, at the very least, I was only allowing myself to see a small sliver of it. It was an embarrassing and deeply important realization. This was a reminder that patients are living the experience of illness and injury—not the operationalizing of PFE best practices—and this internal focus is immediate and unrelenting. For me, this was the beginning of a new way of seeing “the experience of Experience.”

Today, I use Human-Centered Design and Experience Based Co-Design strategies to ensure I am able to uncover the “lived experience” of those providing and receiving medical care. In doing so, I am humbled to have the chance to witness the pain points caused by systems, cultures and perceptions. I am able to quiet my own agenda so those living in the ACTUAL experience have the opportunity to reveal what matters most. I have learned that change happens when an experience can be seen with the 360 degree view: patient, family, professional AND objective observer. Working in this way means I am no longer trying to “push the river,” but, rather, riding its natural flow long enough to gain true insights, understand the priorities and identify the Experience Aim. 

“Ethnographic research” or, what we often call “shadowing,” is not revolutionary in itself. What was revolutionary for me was what shadowing taught me about how much I had lost sight of caring about and capturing actual experiences. As this work evolves, so too does our toolbox of ways to improve. What I know now is that, in the face of so many exciting tactics, we must not allow ourselves to forget about the value of eyes and ears on the frontlines of care. The only way to true partnership (and sustainable improvement) is through a relentless pursuit of the truth using a variety of strategies.

Experience is not only an outcome.

Experience is a practice of returning over and over again to the source (patient, families, clinicians and staff) in order to understand how healthcare is being received and delivered.

Only then can we design meaningful improvements.

 

Tiffany Christensen
Vice President, Experience Innovation
The Beryl Institute

 

Tags:  design  improvement  partnership  staff  strategy  transplant 

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Opposing Natures: Honoring the Properties of Water

Posted By Tiffany Christensen, Wednesday, April 4, 2018
Updated: Tuesday, April 3, 2018

Patient activation is a behavioral concept… It is defined as 'an individual's knowledge, skill, and confidence for managing their health and health care'.
(Hibbard et al 2005).

We know from all of the literature on patient activation that there is a way to both understand and measure a patients’ readiness to manage their health and their healthcare. We also know that there are techniques, such as motivational interviewing, that can assist in moving a patient from lower activation to a higher activation. In so doing, patients and families gain knowledge skills and confidence. As a person working in the field of patient experience, I find activation work to be both inspiring and essential in operationalizing engagement. As a patient, I have experienced activation is a moving target.

Recently, I was reacquainted with my personal activation scale when I found myself feeling puny shortly before a big trip to Thailand. I had never been to Thailand, I was meeting my best friend there and I was using all of my airline miles to have the trip of a lifetime. It goes without saying that I really wanted to go so when I began feeling sick my first thought was “Noooooo! I can’t let this stop me from going!” Like a good CF/Lung Transplant patient, I called my team and set up an appointment to be seen with the hope that I would get the “ok” from my team to go on my big trip. I arrived with my personal SBAR form all filled out, questions at the ready and feeling very high on the activation scale.

The flu swab was negative, WBC was normal, chest X-Ray looked good and I was not spiking fevers. After a great conversation with my transplant medicine doctor, we decided it would be okay to go on the trip as long as my symptoms did not get worse over the next few days. That was the news I hoped to hear!

A few days later, I was on my way to Thailand via a very long series of stops: Raleigh to JFK to Moscow to China to Thailand. Confident I had a simple virus, I boarded my first plane feeling very comfortable with traveling the long distance. By the time I got to JFK, things began to change and by the time I was ready to board the plane to Moscow, I knew I was too sick to travel. After making the tough decision to turn around and getting my flight home arranged, I began my descent into illness.

In the interest of the reader, I want to begin by saying I was fine and I am fine. Eventually, it was determined through a bronchoscopy that I did have the flu. Just the flu. Especially this season, few people seemed to be able to avoid this virus and, just by how common it is, it seems silly to say that it brought me to my knees; especially in light of my past medical history. But it did.

Fever, fatigue, coughing…the normal flu stuff. At some point in the illness process I lost my voice entirely which was far more debilitating than I would have imagined it to be. As a CF/ Lung Transplant patient, I was hyper-focused on my symptoms and my internal life was one of balancing logic (“this is just the flu”) with diligence (“you can’t let this get away from you”). I had faith in my team and hoped each day that I would feel better but, day after day, I felt worse and worse. Worry began to creep in and clouded my mind. My once clear, organized approach to dealing with this illness challenge began to slip away. My level of activation seemed to be melting away along with my sense of well-being.

It was approximately one week after my initial symptoms that I had a night of restless sleep peppered with visions of ventilators. It was as if I could feel the life draining out of my body and I thought to myself, “Oh, I can see how people die from the flu.” I couldn’t help but wonder if I was experiencing anxiety or a premonition. My canceled trip to Thailand was no longer something I gave a second thought—my goal had shifted from wanting to go on that trip to wanting to make it through this alive.

The following morning, I carried the weight of my ventilator dreams with me as I went to have a bronchoscopy. At the hospital, I felt what has become a very common dichotomy for me: my very personal (often unspoken) illness experience butting up against the day-to-day work of those caring for me.

Because of my history working in a hospital, I both recognize and respect the “why and how” of daily operations. During the years I worked as a patient advocate in an academic medical center, my days were dictated by structure. The structure of the CMS policies I was required to follow, the structure of prioritizing the calls, letters and pages I received each day and the structure of daily work flow for the clinical providers surrounding me. Checklists, protocols and routines were everywhere. Assuming the role of sick patient, however, I was reminded that the experience of being a patient is often the antithesis of a structured, day-to-day norm. In fact, showing up for healthcare is quite opposite from a “normal” day. Likewise, being activated wasn’t something I had achieved and could check off of a to-list; it was something that I had to work to maintain.

The walk from the car to the front door was difficult; I was too weak to walk without holding on to my friend. After checking in, I had to get labs, CT and go to clinic. All of these were in very different parts of the hospital and the walk to each area seemed to be miles and miles. In each waiting room, I longed to lie down but there were only hard, upright chairs. I wore a mask and, since I lost my voice, nobody could hear me or see my mouth move. Person after person seemed both surprised and shocked to discover I was unable to communicate verbally. To all of the people I presented to, my case was not remarkable nor was it dire. Objectively, they were correct. That didn’t change the fact that I was still weighed down by my night of ICU visions and getting from “A” to “B” seemed to take all of the strength I could muster. It seems strange to me now that all of those emotional twists and turns had gone largely undetected by those around me; both my medical team and my family.

After the bronchoscopy, I was given strong antibiotics and slowly began to recover. My healing was as palpable as my descent into illness. I could feel my body changing every day and, some days, I was filled with a sense of euphoria because of my improving health. The tides had shifted and my internal life was one of hope and gratitude. Increasing physical strength buoyed my ability manage my life again. My challenging internal journey was winding down and I was returning to my “activated” self.  My sites were now set on going back to work and rescheduling that trip to Thailand.

If we want to "engage" patients, we must never lose sight of the fact that we are functioning in two different worlds: one that demands predictable outcomes and one that, by its own nature, can never be truly be made submissive to our will. As many times as I have lived through illness and healing, I am always amazed at how quickly I forget the reality of what it is to experience it. To try and operationalize the patient experience is like trying to contain water. It can be done, certainly, but to dishonor the unpredictable nature of illness/healing is like trying to deny the properties of water.

As we continue to hammer out ways to be better partners in the road of illness and healing, it’s natural for people on both sides of the bed to feel frustration. It’s also imperative that we keep in mind that this frustration does not result from one person being right or one person being wrong. Both are simply behaving exactly as the nature of their respective experiences dictate: the healthcare professional is functioning from logic, structure and science and the patient is immersed in the ever-changing tides of an illness/healing dynamic.

Activation levels are not a constant, no matter who the patient happens to be or how extensive their medical history. Knowledge, skills and confidence rise and fall like water lapping against the shore. If we begin all of our interactions with that awareness, we can put aside some intrinsic, (often) unconscious frustrations that derail us from partnership and effective communication. It is then we can truly meet people where they are and come together as a team.

 

Tiffany Christensen
Vice President, Experience Innovation
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  communication  flu  healthcare team  partnership  patient engagement  personal experience  recovery  story  team  together  transplant 

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Patient Experience: A Global Conversation

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Thursday, May 4, 2017
Updated: Thursday, May 4, 2017

I am writing this blog as we wrap up the 2017 Patient Experience Symposium in Sydney. The event, a collaboration among healthcare and consumer organizations in Australia committed to engaging in and expanding the conversation on patient experience, comes on the heels of an incredible Patent Experience Week where we saw organizations from around the globe celebrating those committed to excellence in patient experience. In that same period, we had the release of the latest issue of Patient Experience Journal (PXJ) that brought together perspectives from around the world and is now read in over 190 countries and territories.

As I reflect on just these last few days, they represent a significant statement about where the patient experience movement is going. They also offer us some perspective on the opportunity we have before us and the efforts we must consider in moving to action overall. The experience movement that bloomed in the last decade and that some called a fad that would soon pass or an idea that would be obscured by shifting policy focus or diluted by competing priorities, instead has found itself expanding with purpose.

As Jane Cummings, CNO England wrote in her commentary in the latest PXJ, “the global dialogue on patient experience will become even more important, as we recognise that despite differences in design and operation, the challenges our health systems face and the focus on what matters most to patients are shared.” This recognition that we are moving to a macro effort, acknowledging the reality of our own individual systemic constraints not as impediments, but perhaps learning points to be leveraged is where opportunity calls us. In looking across systems boundaries and peeling back policy layers, we reveal fundamentals that rest solidly at the heart of the experience conversation. These ideas were reinforced in the latest State of Patient Experience data just released during Patient Experience Conference 2017.

  1. Experience must remain an integrated focus on quality, safety, service and more. To provide the best in experience and effect positive change, we can no longer force boundaries between these efforts in the face that they are all part of what patients, families and consumers encounter.
  2. The fastest growing area of focus for organizations in addressing experience is employee engagement. This rapid rise in both recognition of and focus on staff needs in the healthcare ecosystem is fundamental and significant. The idea that we must take care of ourselves to take care of others, is not just motherly advice, but sound strategic thinking in a business where we are human beings caring for human beings.
  3. In finding employee engagement at the heart of all we do, it is forever intertwined with the engagement of patients and family members as partners in this work, not only in their own care plans, but in the very work we must do to redesign our systems of care, co-design new processes and better understand the needs of those we serve. My visit this last two weeks in Australia and the opportunity to engage with both the consumer councils in New South Wales and Western Australia reinforced the critical point that patients, family and community members are partners in and consumers of care. This idea spans our globe and must be central to any actions we take.

In all that I had the chance to see and learn during my last 10 days in Australia, what was shared over PX Week and is part of the ongoing patient experience conversation, not only are these core ideas central across time zones, there are core practices that follow as well. These include ideas such as the intentional collection of actionable data – both through formal survey methods and now more so in real time to address critical issues and build cases for change, interdisciplinary rounds and bedside shift reports and handoffs, creating formal structures and processes for engaging patients and families on councils, boards and committees and expanding how staff and employees can provide feedback and contribute to improvements.

In finding core ideas and common ground, we must also acknowledge the work of patient experience is not easy work. It is not something we master simply by creating checklists or wrangle with protocols. It is something that requires strategic commitment, an openness to collaboration and sharing and perhaps most of all an acknowledgement that we are all in this effort together. There is a global conversation taking place on patient experience, one focused on creating the best healthcare systems driving the best results on all corners of our globe.

We must now be willing to share wildly and steal willingly in order to learn from one another and improve. That is our greatest and most critical opportunity and one we should not take lightly. We are in a unique and opportune moment in healthcare, for as an industry in serving those in front of us, we can and will bring this world closer. It is a conversation I am honored to be a part of and one I, and I hope each of you, will strive every day to champion.

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., CPXP
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  collaboration  community of practice  employee engagement  global  partnership  patient and family engagement  patient experience week  state of patient experience 

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The Patient Experience Deserves More Than 63%

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, February 4, 2014

I have yet to meet anyone in healthcare who suggests patient experience is not important. In fact, I often hear it said to be "one of our top priorities”, "a central pillar in our strategy” or "a critical initiative for our organization”. I do not question the sincerity of these declarations or the intent they suggest. I also recognize in the highly dynamic world of healthcare today we are in a constant struggle to balance our priorities. With that, I offer these thoughts to shift our thinking in how we approach experience overall.

To frame what I mean about patient experience I return to the definitiongenerated by the members of The Beryl Institute community – the sum of all interactions, shaped by an organization’s culture, that influence patient perceptions across the continuum of care. I also want to challenge the perspective of some in equating patient experience only to service and question our inside-out focus in healthcare as we often operationally differentiate quality, safety and service. While we may operate these efforts in distinct and at times competing manners, I do not believe patients distinguish between these areas. Yes, we must focus on quality, safety and service and align the appropriate resources to each, but we must address these efforts from the eyes of our consumer and the perspective that they together create but one experience.

As I have continued to hear patient experience identified as a strategic priority, it has caused me to ask, does this mean based on needs there are then specific times when we actually focus on it (and therefore times we don't). That is, do we truly focus on every one of our priorities at all times? Continuing this thought, if patient experience is seen as an initiative, it has all but been declared a limited effort, for every initiative I have experienced in healthcare and elsewhere has a beginning, middle and therefore an end. Do we truly think the patient experience is an idea where the effort eventually concludes?

These ideas around alignment, priority and initiative were supported in the findings of the 2013 Benchmarking Study, The State of Patient Experience in American Hospitals. The research revealed something one could potentially overlook in all that was uncovered. In the U.S. Hospital System the individual with primary responsibility for patient experience spends 63% of their time on these efforts. In contrast, I do not know of a CFO that spends 63% of his time on finances. The data itself reinforces the opportunity we may very well be missing. Have we made patient experience a 63% priority? If we take that to the extreme, does that mean it is only something we consider for 63 out of every 100 patients we see? I do not believe any organization or leader has done this intentionally, but it does cause us to hopefully stop and think about how we lead and operate our organizations and systems.

I know those in healthcare are more committed than what the number reveals. We are an industry of caring and compassionate people who give all they can in every moment. But the data opens our eyes to the opportunities we have. Perhaps what we have lost in our efforts to address patient experience is our realization that experience is all we are about in healthcare. I know that if any one of us were laying on an exam table, recovering in a bed, or sitting holding the hand of a family member that we would not expect anything less than 100%. In fact I believe we would say we want the best in quality, safety and service – the best experience – in every encounter. I believe we all do want the best in patient experience for all those in our care. I hope we too agree the patient experience deserves more than 63%. So how can we start to do things differently today? I look forward to your thoughts.

Jason. A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Metrics and Measurement.

Tags:  bottom line  change  choice  Continuum of Care  culture  defining patient experience  expectations  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interactions  partnership  Patient Experience  priorities  quality  safety  service  service excellence  strategy 

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Reflecting on The Patient Experience Movement: The Power of Voices and Collaboration

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Wednesday, December 18, 2013
Updated: Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Patient Experience - Voices in CollaborationAs we stand at the end of each year, we tend to look back at all that led us to this moment and anticipate all that lies ahead. I stand here now with all of you that comprise our patient experience community, who live and breathe in your every action this patient experience movement, and can say without hesitation that together we have accomplished great things and together there are even more powerful moments to come.

 

This year has exemplified our core values at The Beryl Institute – the importance of community and the integral role of collaboration. We have worked to reinforce the true power of engaging all voices in the patient experience conversation. This gathering of voices has seen our patient experience community grow from 11,000 to 20,000 members and guests this year alone, representing over 45 countries. This gathering of voices has led to a year in which the foundational ideas of this movement have been reinforced and solidified. In our commitment to expand access to the greatest breadth and depth of individuals across healthcare we recently expanded our membership framework to provide access to all associates in any healthcare facility. These Institutional memberships enable staff at all levels, in all roles, across the range of healthcare organizations to engage, to learn and to lead in their own environments.

 

In expanding the conversation on voice itself, this year has been shaped by the Voices of Patient Experience series in which we heard from the C-Suite, front-line practice, students across healthcare disciplines, physicians, patients and families and those measuring the impact of our patient experience efforts. This collection of voices served to complement the many others that contributed to learning and sharing of ideas via webinars and case studies, Patient Experience Conference presentations and On the Road visits. Hundreds of you added your thoughts to the conversation via these and other outlets. This open sense of sharing, of giving, of collaboration has allowed the patient experience movement to thrive.

 

The voices series also raised a significant awareness for the community; to be an organization truly committed to patient experience, we had to move beyond the talk about what we do "to” patients and families, and reinforce an unwavering commitment to do "with”. This partnership in care underlines the very intent of the Institute to provide a place to learn from one another, and it was clear that included the voices of patients and families themselves. This led us to establish the Global Patient & Family Advisory Council, comprised of leading patient and family thinkers, writers, speakers and activists. It also had us collaborate with IHI at the 2013 National Forum to support the "Patient is In” Booth in which patients and family members could share input and ideas with forum participants. These voices remind us of the boundless value of this partnership in patient experience improvement.

 

The expansion of voices also led to the 2ndState of Patient Experience Study, the largest conducted to date on patient experience efforts, and revealed some interesting trends in the both the focus, intent and awareness of patient experience efforts. Yet, while the movement continues to push on, less than 50% of U.S. hospitals have yet to formally define patient experience for themselves. We still have great opportunities to educate and learn from one another.

 

This awareness made it only natural that we expand our efforts overall on the professional development of patient experience champions, furthering the work on the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge with domain outlines and the anticipated release of the domain courses in 2014. As a community you reinforced your desire and the greater need to shape this work in ways that will allow each and every one of us to grow stronger. The year ahead brings even more exciting work on this front.

 

In a recent Hospital Impact blog I mentioned my great excitement about the growth of the patient experience family overall, from new sister organizations to research entities focusing on this area, to critical gatherings in numerous places in support of this important discussion. We will continue to support and reinforce the value of all these efforts and maintain that in collaboration we all win in this movement. We remain committed to serving as a hub and connector of the many voices focused on this effort and keep our arms open for the opportunities for further collaboration.

 

This very idea led to us to begin conversations with and engage in a formal collaboration with the Society for Healthcare Consumer Advocacy (SHCA) and its 40 years of incredible history and commitment to patient voice, rights and advocacy. A strong and storied organization whose roots can be found at the very start of the patient experience movement, SHCA felt they found a home for their future with The Beryl Institute, but I would say while the container is the Institute, the home is the community of peers, of leaders and teachers, of resource providers and caregivers, of patients and families who make up this growing professional home for so many. The integration with SHCA and the purposeful collaboration with a growing number of organizations committed to this cause help reinforce the power that collaboration itself brings to this conversation.

 

I would be remiss if I did not add a personal note to this reflection on the year, that as I stood on stage to close Patient Experience Conference 2013 and received the call that I needed to rush home for the delivery of my son, I shifted abruptly from champion and advocate for a movement to a family member surround by a healthcare system still admittedly learning itself. My eyes were opened, not only by the magic of the birth of a child, but of a family member watching your loved ones cared for, your new child handled, complications managed and tense moments relieved. We must not forget we are all patients and family members and need to continue our work as such.

 

The work you do may at times seem like small gestures, part of your standard process or even done automatically as a seasoned veteran, but to a patient or family member you are providing an incredible gesture of service, of quality, of safety – of experience. In every moment we have the choice to create the experience for our patients and their families. And every moment each of you as members of this community, of this movement, have that choice as well…to engage, to learn, to contribute, and to encourage the involvement of others.

 

You see this is your community, it is built on the power of your voices, it is driven by the collaboration we find with one another and it is from that place that we look to the new year knowing that the greatest opportunities still lie ahead. Thank you for your contributions, support and leadership. May you have a healthy and happy holiday and be ready with great excitement for all the New Year will bring.

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Communication.

Tags:  Advocacy  body of knowledge  community of practice  consumer advocacy  defining patient experience  Field of Patient Experience  improving patient experience  partnership  Patient Experience  thought leadership  voice 

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Patients are Partners in Experience, Not Just Recipients of One

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Thursday, June 6, 2013
Updated: Thursday, June 6, 2013

In my most recent Hospital Impact blog I noted that "how” we choose to do things in healthcare will and should trump the "what”. This is supported by my travels through numerous healthcare organizations where it is becoming evident that the core practices organizations are using to drive patient experience success are more and more consistent. While some might see this as limiting, I see it as encouraging.

Why is that? It means we are listening to one another, learning from each other and showing an incredible willingness to "steal ideas shamelessly” as a well respected CEO once shared with me in describing a component of their organizational success. That means the ‘what’ we do is not very different location to location. The distinguishing characteristic in experience is not the things you do, but the way in which your deliver. This is at the core of the very definition of patient experience as "the sum of all interactions, shaped by an organization’s culture”.

This ability to listen and learn from one another is a central value of all we do at The Beryl Institute. As a global community of practice we can (and must) learn from all edges of the community – those Institutions rated the "best” or seen as the "biggest” do not represent the only expertise. Rather it is in trying and executing of ideas in organizations of all shapes, sizes and focus through which excellence is supported and shared. It is based on this premise that the idea of a broad and inclusive range of voices has been so central to our work.

In returning to the conversation of "how”, I reflect on the recent conversations I had with 18 incredible patient and family advocates committed to the work of improving quality, safety and service for patients and families around the world in preparing the most recent paper from The Beryl Institute – Voices of Patients and Families: Partners in the Patient Experience. The stories these individual’s shared of compassion personified and at times the uglier side of care help us realize that there is power in how we choose to manage the interactions we have in healthcare every day. That it is truly more than the tactics, and rather the execution that matters.

The point I make here is all the tactics in the world amount to very little if all they are is something we do TO people in our care. The old language of provider and recipient may well still be used in healthcare, but its use is outdated and indicative of a system in need of change. Patients – yes, you and I, our children and parents, family and friends – are active parts of the healthcare equation, not passive recipients of it. We need to ensure we start acting this way. This perspective is exemplified through the work of such great organizations as the Society for Participatory Medicine.

While there are countless lessons shared by the individuals interviewed in the Voices paper, we inherently know many of them ourselves. Our contributors helped frame three central ideas in ensuring partnership in the care environment:

1. Acknowledge patients are not subjects in the healthcare process or "something” you should talk about or plan for in third person.

2. Recognize patients are not necessarily wired to actively engage in the healthcare process, due both to the complexity of healthcare and the nature of the system itself (that potentially diminishes the role of the patient in an unspoken hierarchy of expertise). You must ask, encourage, and act on the patient’s voice.

3. Consider coordinating efforts to identify and incorporate patient perceptions into the overall planning of care.

Personally, as I continue the journey of new fatherhood, I saw this play out in the very interactions we have had with our pediatrician. At our stage as new parents, we could be scolded, challenged or even talked down to about how we handle situations. Instead our doc engages us based on our questions, our hopes and fears. I know she is getting all the needed clinical work done, but she is including us as patients and family, as partners in the process. This is an active decision on her part, it is one that engages us in the care of our son and ensures a positive experience with every visit. "How” is a choice we can all make in healthcare and is one I believe will make all the difference.

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Patient & Family Centeredness.

Tags:  bottom line  choice  culture  defining patient experience  employee engagement  expectations  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  Interactions  partnership  patient engagement  Patient Experience  patient stories  service excellence 

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