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The Beryl Institute Patient Experience Blog
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Exploring the Value of Patient Experience

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Tuesday, July 5, 2016

In my most recent Patient Experience Blog I suggested we are now entering the Experience Era, offering eight considerations we should act on to not only usher in its arrival, but also support its place at the heart of our healthcare conversation. At the same time, we are seeing in all corners of healthcare and all touchpoints across the care continuum that the conversation on healthcare is dramatically shifting. Beyond a simple acknowledgement of the rise of consumerism in healthcare there is a more fundamental commitment to a focus on experience and all that encompasses.

Even with a much clearer and measurable focus on experience, we still are in our infancy in identifying and measuring key points of value that are realized in efforts to drive the best in experience. Yet, I believe we can say with some confidence that experience efforts, when approached with the requisite breadth and depth, have a significant influence on the outcomes we look to achieve – both in clinical practice across quality, safety and service and in broader operational results – including clinical and financial outcomes and consumer loyalty and community reputation.

With that recognition, we are excited to open a global inquiry into what people see as the value in a focus on experience overall. Our hope with this exploration is to understand the motivations, actions, impact and outcomes associated with a focus on patient experience. As part of this inquiry we are also looking to identify the proven practices being implemented to address patient experience excellence from the perspective of not only healthcare organizations, but also consumers of healthcare, be they patients, family members or other support networks. I invite and encourage you to participate.

Respondents will be asked to provide thoughts from a primary perspective – that of a patient or family member or member of a support network, that of a healthcare team member, or that of a healthcare leader/administrator – but are invited (and encouraged) to provide insights from the other perspectives they may bring to the conversation. This is critical to reinforcing that all voices matter and in healthcare many actually engage with multiple voices. Through this exploration, incorporating this range of perspectives will help us identify commonalities and distinctions in how people both approach and evaluate patient experience and will allow us to frame a broader picture of how value is perceived.

I believe, as I have seen on our journey in expanding the patient experience conversation these last few years via The Beryl Institute, that we must be willing to ask the big questions and dig into the critical issues that will continue to create the greatest opportunities for healthcare globally. As the experience movement grows we must be rigorous in reinforcing value, committed to continuing to push the edges of our efforts and willing to engage with one another in the topics that will help us to focus with intent on all that is right in healthcare. It is through these efforts that patient experience has found its place at the heart of healthcare overall.

I invite and encourage you to participate and to share this inquiry with your peers and networks. The survey itself should take about 5 minutes to complete and includes 3 open comment questions to answer so respondents can provide the full extent of their thoughts. A report of the findings will be presented this fall and respondents can sign up to get special updates on the survey. You can start the survey here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ValueofPX.

Thank you in advance for your perspective, but more so thank you for your commitment to this movement and to this effort to ensure the experience era in healthcare continues to grow for many years to come.

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  Consumerism  Continuum of Care  exploration  inquiry  invitation  journey  movement  outcomes  patient experience era  perspective  survey  value 

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Patient Experience: From Evidence-Based to Proven Practice

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Tuesday, July 7, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, July 7, 2015

The conversation on how we both measure and show the value of patient experience continues to grow. With the emergence of systems such as the Center for Medicare and Medicaid services (CMS) 5-star rating systems in the US and other performance measures coming online in countries around the world, healthcare organizations, and the people that use them daily, are struggling to identify measures with meaning. Adding clarity to this conversation has been central to our efforts at The Beryl Institute. 

Healthcare, as a scientifically grounded industry, has had its roots in evidence. This has driven our quality conversations and more so outcomes-based focus for most of its history. In all we have done to cure humanity, we often overlooked the very humans in our midst. My grandfather, a pediatrician himself, used to note that "bedside manner” was not just a part of the job, but rather the way we "treated” people as people, not just treated them as patients, mattered most.

This is why I believe we need to move beyond just evidenced-based, which is driven in the scientific mindset, to proven practice, which is about driving outcomes through doing. I am not suggesting that scientific exploration is a bad idea, just that it cannot be the only way in which we generate, share and disseminate new practice and the opportunity for expanded outcomes.

For this reason, we have built The Beryl Institute as a global community of practice. Sharing efforts that people put in place that not only sound good, but also do good things is critical in our work in patient experience. This level of flexibility provides for the open-minded creativity necessary to drive better results in the highly variable world we live in. Healthcare as a field should be first and foremost about human beings working for the betterment of human beings.

For that reason we launched Patient Experience Journal (PXJ), as a scholar-practitioner outlet to both share rigorous research and leading practices backed up by strong data. By showing what works in practice and sharing it, we can collectively become stronger in our efforts. (Note: The next submission deadline for PXJ is July 31, 2015). For this reason we also created the Patient Experience Grant and Scholar programs. Through these small, but significant grant opportunities, we are supporting exploration on the front lines of experience, leading to new, interesting and innovative solutions that can be replicated in practice.

Lastly, we have found one of the greatest gathering grounds for sharing proven practice in patient experience has become Patient Experience Conference. Now 5 years old, PX Conference brings together over 50 sessions exemplifying the best in practice and ideas and positive impact and measurable outcomes are shared. Not only through these direct learning sessions, but also via personal interactions and networking, people in the experience community are helping to seed and spread practices that can touch the lives of so many in healthcare around the world. (Note: Patient Experience Conference 2016 will be held April 13-15, 2016 in Dallas, TX. Call for presentations is open through July 17, 2015).

The point being here, that if we share the belief that experience is grounded at the point of interaction between one human being and another, we MUST drive the conversation beyond evidence to proven practice – what works in that moment of interaction and leads to the positive, strong and lasting outcomes. If we are to collectively impact proven practice, consider the following:

  1. Outline your process. Capture the process you are putting in place. This helps create institutional memory and replicable practice. What process did you put in place? What resources did it require? Who was involved and what time did it take?
  2. Test your practice. Yes this is where experimentation must come into play, but beyond theory to practice. Proven practice is much more than best practice. It must be shown – proven – to work.
  3. Document your results. Make sure you write up your findings. What worked, what didn't? What were the key lessons learned? What recommendations do you have for others?
  4. Share your findings. Consider avenues to share your information. The power of proven practices is not just the impact they have for your organization, but how they can bring value to others. Consider outlets such as PXJ, Patient Experience Conference, Institute Case Studies and others to share your story and results.

The power of our patient experience community has always been in the space it has provided all of us to share and learn. The key is that we move beyond theory, to where practice is having an impact and driving positive outcomes. The value of what we do together in creating a growing library of ideas is truly the foundation of what patient experience is about. Through our collective voices great things can and do happen… I invite you to contribute.

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  collaboration  community of practice  outcomes  patient experience 

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Reframing Patient & Family Experience

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Thursday, June 4, 2015

As the experience conversation grows and more voices enter the discussion, I have come to recognize a need to reframe how we think about experience overall. In much of what I have written and shared in my talks, I have stressed an important point, that experience at its broadest point is all a patient, long-term care resident and/or family member encounters while they are engaged in our healthcare system. Critical to this idea is that, as outlined in our stand at The Beryl Institute, experience also reaches across all segments of the continuum and the spaces in between.

I raise this again now for as recently as this week I have been asked about how experience fits with quality and safety efforts or compares to patient engagement. My concern and therefore my desire to align our conversation is that many in the experience discussion have become trapped by our own warnings – that we continue to address experience from the perspective of providers rather than what the actual experience is for those in our systems.

I start by reinforcing what patient experience is not, in order to build a framework and encourage a discussion of what experience truly must be. For a long while experience was simply aligned with service or service excellence or even more simply satisfaction. For many it still is. Service in healthcare is critical, as it is the domain through which we find ourselves engaging people with dignity and respect, as one human being to another. Yet service is also not the full extent of what the users in our healthcare systems experience. It is but one piece of a complex pie inclusive of quality, safety, service, cost, outcomes and influenced by caregiver engagement, in which we must work diligently to drive integrated actions. 

This leads to the question is experience engagement? There has been incredible work around the processes and tools to drive patient and family engagement and in their very creation believe our answer is provided. If engaging patients and families in care encounters is of value, which it has proven to be, this too becomes a critical practice in positively impacting experience. Engagement tools, and in similar light the concepts of patient and family, or person centered care, all provide an incredibly important set of resources for ensuring the critical positioning and involvement of patients and families as partners in their care. These ideas too then are not experience in total, but rather are central to ensuring a positive experience overall.

I continue to raise this issue for one central reason. That in all we do to ensure the best in healthcare as I note, from quality, safety and service, to driving outcomes or addressing cost, to implementing processes of engagement or person-centeredness, these ideas are OUR language inside healthcare looking out. Yet when looking from the outside in, they are all but parts of one experience.

With this mindful integration I do not suggest we eliminate all distinct efforts to drive results in these various segments of experience. In fact in order to manage the dynamic nature of healthcare today, we need to focus our work on each of these critical efforts to ensure directional progress and continuous improvement. Rather, I do suggest we MUST NOT tackle each of these efforts in isolation, or under the false pretense that they are not part of the broader experience for patients and families.

So what is the opportunity we then have in reframing patient and family experience? I believe we must:

  1. Look beyond experience as just satisfaction or service to the reality of what our patients and families see every day. We do them great disservice by simplifying this idea in a way it becomes tangential or even "soft” to the hard work we do in healthcare every day.
  2. Align and coordinate our divided efforts, and in doing so, our collective language, to reinforce a commitment to the perspective of the end user in healthcare today. We can still segment our work efforts and improvement opportunities to tackle these often complex opportunities and problems, but we cannot and must not do so to the detriment of providing a coordinated and comprehensive experience.
  3. Work together to address experience from the broadest perspective across and at all touch points and the moments of truth we create clinically, interpersonally, virtually, etc. and include the voices of those we care for and serve to ensure an integrated and experience focused effort overall.

Yes we must focus on the basics – the blocking and tacking of what impacts experience everyday on the front lines of care, at points of transition and in the many seams we have created in between, but if we lose perspective on the broader opportunity, our smaller steps may not help us realize our greater goal. If we are committed to providing the best in experience for all in our healthcare systems – quality, safe, service-oriented, cost efficient, outcomes driven, inclusive, coordinated and compassionate – like I know most in healthcare are, then we still have great opportunities ahead. I challenge us to think about reframing our view of experience. In doing so I believe we will identify and achieve all we know is truly possible for all those touched by healthcare every day.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  conversation  defining patient experience  outcomes  patient and family  Patient Experience 

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