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The Beryl Institute Patient Experience Blog
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When Work Has Meaning

Posted By Deanna Frings, Tuesday, July 10, 2018
Updated: Friday, July 6, 2018

The title of this blog is not original to me but was a headline on the cover of the July-August 2018 issue of Harvard Business Review (HBR) referencing an article, Creating A Purpose-Driven Organization. It seems everywhere I turn, there is another book, article or referenced research on the neuroscience of purpose as a driving force that gives our lives meaning. And let me be clear, I love that there is currently an abundance of discussion on purpose and meaning. 

 

I have worked in healthcare my entire career from being on the front line as a respiratory therapist, leading teams in multiple leadership capacities to my current role as Vice President of Learning and Professional Development of The Beryl Institute. From my experience, conversations on meaning and purpose are not uncommon in the field of healthcare. I don’t know, maybe it’s because those of us who work in healthcare can easily connect that what we do really matters? We save lives. But how is this knowledge being lived out in our day to day practice as leaders in healthcare. Are we creating cultures that facilitate a discovery of purpose for ourselves and our employees? 

 

Organizations are focused on employee engagement and acknowledge its critical role in their experience efforts as reported in our, State of Patient Experience 2017: A Return to Purpose. And, it’s not surprising given the 2017 Gallup State of American Workplace report, that only 33% of employees are engaged in their work and workplace and only 21% of employees strongly agree their performance is managed in a way that motivates them to do outstanding work. 

These startling figures are not a new phenomenon. Previous Gallup Reports have shown much of the same. So, while we acknowledge the importance of an engaged workforce, the data suggests we continue to struggle, despite all the focus on improving it. 

I often speak on the critical role of leaders in achieving experience excellence and I would suggest that leadership is the critical link in transforming organizational cultures and creating engaged environments where individuals can reach their full potential. During these speaking engagements and workshops, I love taking people through a journey of discovery of purpose and meaning and I have witnessed the immediate and powerful impact it has. I hear a higher level of excitement in their voices, a clarity in vision and a drive in their commitment as they share their stories with each other. 

The conversation continues as we take the critical next step and determine actions we, as leaders, can take to not only share our purpose but invite employees to do the same. It’s one way to connect people to purpose. Simply stated in the HBR article, leaders most important role is to connect people to purpose.

Acting on a higher purpose can often motivate us to learn and develop our skills so we can excel in our performance contributing to what’s meaningful to us. It’s one reason I’m excited about Patient Experience 101(PX 101), a new educational resource releasing next week from The Beryl Institute. PX 101 is a comprehensive community-inspired and developed resource to build patient experience knowledge and skill for all employees across an organization by taking individuals through a discovery of purpose. It’s one of several new opportunities we’re launching this year in an effort to support global patient experience efforts based on the needs of our community. 

PX 101 offers the tools and activities you need to engage in deeper and authentic conversations on what patient experience is, what it means to your employees and how they positively impact experience excellence. It invites them to share their own accounts of how they make a positive difference resulting in a stronger sense of purpose and meaning to the work they do every day. 

 

When we find meaning and purpose in our work, the sky’s the limit to how high we can soar and how much we can contribute to our individual and organization’s success.  

As leaders in healthcare striving for excellence in experience, how do you connect people to purpose?


Deanna Frings, MS Ed, CPXP
Vice President, Learning and Professional Development
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  choice  compassion  culture  employee engagement  healthcare  improving patient experience  leadership  Patient Experience  personal experience  perspective  purpose 

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There’s No Place like Home…The Value of Connecting with Your Patient Experience Community

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Tuesday, June 13, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, June 13, 2017

I recently chatted with one of our members after she returned from another healthcare conference. While she enjoyed the event, she shared that the experience itself felt dramatically different than her time at our March Patient Experience Conference in Denver. I asked a few questions to try to understand what the difference was. The breakout sessions were great, the keynote speakers were inspiring, and it was a large crowd of other leaders in similar types of roles. Yet, she still felt something was lacking. Upon further reflection, she realized the missing element was the sense of community and emotional connection she experiences every year at The Beryl Institute conference.

Her comments reinforced feedback received after this year’s Patient Experience Conference. Participants said things such as, “Everyone was so kind and helpful…it was easy to meet people…it was so wonderful to be surrounded by like-minded people…we're all in this together!” These statements reflect things we hear often at the Institute, an appreciation for the welcoming and engaging community that has developed through a shared passion for building and sustaining the patient experience movement. 

Our community connects in many ways throughout the year – chatter on social media, regular discussions on listservs, and conversations through Topic Calls and Patient Advocacy Connection Calls. In recent months, we’ve also enjoyed watching dialogue between members explode in the chat box of our regular webinars where participants share where they’re logging in from, reconnect with old friends and tap into the tremendous wealth of knowledge that is represented in this patient experience community.

The virtual connections are powerful and a hallmark of The Beryl Institute. While these opportunities are invaluable, I would argue there is no replacement for spending time together in person. As the patient experience movement has grown, we’ve witnessed incredible connections between the leaders doing this work and an amazing energy and enthusiasm that comes when we gather together to share ideas, connect and learn. Our community believes patient experience is a foundational element of the overall healthcare experience, and there is something about getting together in person that inspires us to live and share that message.

At The Beryl Institute we continue to foster opportunities for face-to-face connections. Last week we announced the opening of the Call for Submissions for breakout sessions at Patient Experience Conference 2018 to be held April 16-18 in Chicago. We hope you will join us there and even consider submitting a proposal to share your patient experience successes.
 
But even before then we have many opportunities for you to engage face-to-face with patient experience peers. This fall we’ll hold Patient Experience Regional Roundtables in Canada, California, Louisiana and New York. Regional Roundtables are one-day programs bringing together the voices of healthcare leaders, staff, physicians, patients and families to convene, engage and expand the dialogue on improving patient experience. Through inspiring keynote sessions and working group discussion, participants leave with an expanded network, renewed energy and actionable ideas to support patient experience efforts in their own organizations.

We also have two upcoming Certified Patient Experience Professional (CPXP) preparation workshops. These are opportunities to gather with other patient experience leaders to not only network and share, but to prepare together for the CPXP exam. Community members will gather later this month in Chicago and in September in Los Angeles for full day courses reviewing the domains outlined in the job classification on which the CPXP examination is based. 

The Beryl Institute continues to be the global community of practice dedicated to improving the patient experience through collaboration and shared knowledge. We are a welcoming and engaging community. I am often reminded of an early Patient Experience Conference where a participant stood up and joyfully proclaimed “I have found my professional home!”  As a leader in the movement, we hope you view the Institute as your professional home, and we invite you to further connect with your patient experience family. 


Stacy Palmer, CPXP
Senior Vice President
The Beryl Institute 

Tags:  community of practice  Field of Patient Experience  healthcare  improving patient experience  leadership  networking  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  thought leadership 

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Taking a Stand on Patient Experience Policy

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Thursday, November 3, 2016

Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world.

Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.

These words by Margaret Meade may both best exemplify the efforts of our growing patient experience movement and in some ways now mischaracterize what is truly happening. What has evolved in the last decade, grounded in a rich history of patient’s rights and patient advocacy and catalyzed by the perfect storm of policy, technology, access to information and shifting expectations, is both a new sense of power and increased accountability to change the very conversation of healthcare itself. No longer are people in and engaging with healthcare systems globally sitting idly by as passengers, but rather with each passing day more and more are raising their voices on their own needs, expectations and perspectives. And while this may challenge many long standing traditions of HOW, specifically, the art of medicine was practiced, in fact, this emerging perspective may fundamentally underline the WHY of healthcare found at its very beginnings.

This premise, that we are reigniting our focus in healthcare on human beings caring for human beings, is at the heart of the growing patient experience movement. We are no longer just a small group, but an expanding community of committed people, both those experiencing care and those providing it. Yet in this effort there remains the need for sparks of progress and the dynamic tension that continues to push us past complacency to the new edges of this movement.

That very thing happened in the last year when a group of patient experience leaders associated with the Institute raised the critical issue of ensuring their voices and the voices of those they cared for were more actively engaged in shaping the very policy under which they were expected to act. From that inspiring discussion evolved an initial gathering held just last week to begin and expand a dialogue on what a stand on engaging in patient experience policy can and should look like. This meeting on creating a framework for patient experience policy brought together a range of rich and diverse perspectives, including patient and family voices, healthcare and patient experience leadership, organizations and institutes who have committed years to expanding this dialogue in healthcare for patients and families, caregivers and physicians and the policy framers themselves.

The purpose of this gathering was to act as a jumping off point for an expanding and inclusive conversation on the importance of engaging all voices in policy related to patient experience. The meeting served as a working session for shared discovery and creation and reinforced the importance of active engagement in driving policy decisions in our healthcare system today. As a result of the group’s work, critical priorities were identified with a shared recognition that this was just the first step in how these topics should be addressed. The priorities and some initial thinking around each include:

  • Value – What is the value of a true commitment to patient experience?
  • Patient/Family Voice – How do we give clear and strong opportunities for the voices of the healthcare consumer to be heard?
  • Measurement – How do we ensure we are measuring what matters in ways that are both of value and minimal burden?
  • Alignment – In what ways can we ensure coordination across the continuum of care so efforts reflect the totality of experience, not just distinct segments of it?
  • Transparency – How can we expand the opportunity beyond just posting scores and cost to access to information and understanding of healthcare itself?
  • Professional Education/Workforce Development – In what ways must we rethink training healthcare professionals to ensure a shared understanding of experience and a focused commitment to action?
  • Healthcare Teams/Employees – How do we reinforce our commitment to those who have chosen to care for others, reinforce resilience and tackle compassion fatigue and burnout?

From this effort and alignment around these priorities, emerged a strong sense of both connection and purpose among the participants and their respective organizations. There was also an acknowledgement that this emerging coalition for patient experience policy had a great deal of work ahead. Perhaps the most important recognition of the gathering was that we are just at the beginning of this effort, and for all the voices that could fit in this small room, there are many more to still be engaged across the spectrum of healthcare.

This is where everyone who inspired this initial step, everyone who participated in this first gathering and all who are yet to engage in this effort now stand. At the edge of a new and vital frontier of bringing voice to ensuring healthcare remains true to its purpose. In a landscape of political churn and often competing organizational priorities by many of the interests who often capitalize on the healthcare system, this group and each and every one of you engaged in the patient experience movement have to put a stake in the ground that our voices and these issues are vital to where healthcare moves.

This is not to say there are not current efforts underway to address some of these very priorities today, but more so we believe with collective and clear voice the opportunities for impacting healthcare for all it encompasses is even greater. And with great thanks to the catalysts of this conversation, the participants in this gathering and to all of you who will move this effort forward, that is the opportunity before us. I can think of no greater or important journey we can be on together than that of ensuring the best we can as human beings caring for human beings.

If you are interested in actively participating in or staying up to date on the patient experience policy effort, you can provide your contact information via this link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PX_POLICY.

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  healthcare policy  leadership  professional education  stand  state of patient experience  value 

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Reflecting on the Field of Patient Experience

Posted By Deanna Frings, Tuesday, April 5, 2016
Updated: Tuesday, April 5, 2016

I was recently invited to participate in a panel discussion on the topic of talent and the patient experience at an event for healthcare human resource professionals.  The event says so much about how far we have come in our understanding of what it takes to support patient experience excellence and this emerging field.  Preparing for this event gave me the opportunity to step back and reflect on the field of patient experience. 

Prior to joining the team at The Beryl Institute, I was a member of this global community of practice and attended the PX Conference in 2012.  It was here that I first heard about the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge, a framework of 15 broadly accepted domains reflecting the knowledge and skills of a patient experience professional.  

As I sat listening to the details of the framework and how it came to be, I was thrilled not only because over 400 individuals from 10 countries contributed to its development but it was the first time I began thinking about what I did as a growing profession, a field of practice and an emerging field.  I had something concrete to take back to my own organization that so clearly framed this field of patient experience and defined its core ideas.  

You see, my entry into patient experience started like many across the country.  I was asked to be part of a committee within my health system charged with implementing tactics that would improve our patient satisfaction scores.  Over the next several years, that committee membership evolved to a dedicated role as the Director of Patient and Family Relations leading the organization’s efforts on building a culture of experience excellence.  Our journey was very similar to others as evidenced in the findings of The State of the Patient Experience 2015 Study showing a growing acknowledgement from senior executives on the importance of investing resources dedicated to patient experience leaders. 

Fast forwarding to late spring 2014, I had been in my role with The Beryl Institute as the Director of Learning & Professional Development for one year and we had launched the first five PX Body of Knowledge courses.  In 2015, we achieved a major milestone when all 15 courses became available, one for each domain.   It was the first time a comprehensive program was available supporting professional development of healthcare leaders in the field of patient experience. 

We have since awarded a total of over 60 Certificates in Patient Experience Leadership and Patient Advocacy and there are over 250 currently completing the PX Body of Knowledge courses.  Not only do these numbers show the high level of interest patient experience professionals have in developing their knowledge and skills but they show again the acknowledgement by senior executives of the critical role of leadership in achieving patient experience excellence.

As I come to a close with my reflections, I would be remiss if I did not mention the incredible work at our sister organization, Patient Experience Institute.  Following a rigorous and standardized process and involving hundreds of members of the global patient experience community, the first inaugural Certified Patient Experience Professional (CPXP) exam was launched this past December. Achievement of CPXP certification highlights a commitment to the profession and to maintaining current skills and knowledge in supporting and expanding the field of patient experience and demonstrates clear qualifications to senior leaders, colleagues, and the industry. 

It’s always nice to reflect back as a means to identify the progress made. We know patient experience matters, it continues to be a top priority and there is a growing acknowledgement of the critical need and value for dedicated patient experience leaders.  And to that end, we must all take action in shaping the future field of patient experience.

  1. There is a recognized need for individuals with the knowledge and skills to lead patient experience efforts.  Use the PX Body of Knowledge framework to assess your professional development needs and build a plan to advance your knowledge and skills.
  2. Everyone plays an important role in the patient experience.  Share the framework with your Human Resource partners and work with them integrating the patient experience leadership competencies as part of an overall talent management strategy.
  3. Senior Leaders recognize that leadership is a strategic asset.  Be a role model and distinguish yourself as a leader in today’s healthcare marketplace.  Work within your organization's advocating and in supporting all healthcare leaders have the skills and knowledge critical to ensure the best experiences for your patients, their families and your employees positioning your organization to drive the best in outcomes for all you serve.  

As the journey continues, I’m excited about the future.  I encourage each of you to be part of the ongoing conversation sharing your ideas on how to support, educate and influence the many leaders across all functions within your organization.  I know I'm looking forward to the conversation next week with healthcare human resource professionals as they explore their role in ensuring an excellent experience for all.

Deanna Frings
Director, Learning and Professional Development
The Beryl Institute

 

Tags:  community  community of practice  employee engagement  engagement  healthcare  improving patient experience  Leadership  Patient Experience  service excellence 

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How Will You Invest in Patient Experience in 2016?

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Tuesday, December 1, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, December 1, 2015

We recently celebrated our first five years as a community of practice and looked back, somewhat in awe, at the incredible growth of this organization over such a short time. The Beryl Institute is now a global community of almost 40,000 individuals passionate about improving the healthcare experience for patients, families and caregivers.

The momentum continues, as does the realization that organizations are making significant investments in time, energy and dollars to ensure they are prepared to deliver the best possible patient experience. We see these investments in many forms from hiring teams to training leaders and staff to building and supporting cultures of excellence.

As we shared in the 2015 State of Patient Experience Benchmarking study, senior patient experience leadership and staff investment is growing with 42% of respondents having a Chief Experience Officer (or comparable position) compared to only 22% two years ago.  Along with that, the size of patient experience teams is growing; 33% of organizations reported having five or more staff members supporting patient experience efforts. 

The Beryl Institute community reflects this trend as well. This year over 200 organizations will invest in institutional membership – meaning they provide unlimited access to the Institute’s white papers, webinars, topic calls, learning bites, etc. to everyone within their facility. They are making a statement that people in ALL roles impact the patient experience and should have access to research and collaboration that will assist their efforts.

We have also seen tremendous interest in learning and professional development programs intended to train patient experience leaders and other staff. We recently increased our virtual classroom offerings in the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge courses to support growing participation in the community-developed program that provides Certificates in Patient Experience Leadership and Patient Advocacy.

Patient Experience Conference had its largest attendance to date this year and we were honored to partner with member organizations to host sold out Regional Roundtable events in San Francisco, Charlotte and Minneapolis. Our community is eager to gain (and share) knowledge and to invest in their personal career growth. In fact, today our sister organization, Patient Experience Institute, will offer the first testing opportunity for those hoping to earn their CPXP, the professional certification for Patient Experience Leaders.

While we’re excited to celebrate the five-year milestone, we acknowledge how much work is still to be done. We imagine (and hope to help inspire) a world where all healthcare organizations appreciate the power and impact of patient experience efforts and make without hesitation the investments necessary to be the best they can be for patients and families.

Earlier this year we released Our Stand, a list of guiding principles we’ve identified in our five years of leading this work that can have significant impact on patient experience success. I share them again as a reminder as you evaluate your own efforts and consider what investment opportunities make sense to support your specific needs.

We believe organizations and systems committed to providing the best in experience WILL:

  • Identify and support accountable leadership with committed time and focused intent to shape and guide experience strategy
  • Establish and reinforce a strong, vibrant and positive organizational culture and all it comprises
  • Develop a formal definition for what experience is to their organization
  • Implement a defined process for continuous patient and family input and engagement
  • Engage all voices in driving comprehensive, systemic and lasting solutions
  • Look beyond clinical experience of care to all interactions and touch points
  • Focus on alignment across all segments of the continuum and the spaces in between
  • Encompass both a focus on healing and a commitment to well-being

As you prepare for the coming year I challenge you to reflect on your organization’s commitment to experience improvement. Where are you exceling and where are your opportunities to do even more for your patients, families, caregivers and staff? Our patient experience community is here to support your journey and I encourage you to take full advantage of the incredible resources and knowledge available. 

Wishing you a wonderful holiday season and a successful New Year!

 

Stacy Palmer
Vice President, Strategy and Member Experience
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  body of knowledge  certification  collaboration  community of practice  Continuum of Care  culture  employee engagement  Field of Patient Experience  global healthcare  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  Interactions  Leadership  Nurse Leadership  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  Regional Roundtable  service excellence 

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Become a Leader in the Patient Experience Movement

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Tuesday, August 5, 2014
Updated: Tuesday, August 5, 2014

I recently received a note from a new member who is early in her career and looking for ways to maximize her membership to get "plugged in” to the Institute and gain credibility within the patient experience community. We get questions like this often. While passionate about getting involved in the patient experience movement, many of our members aren’t quite sure how to get started.

To help, I want to share the suggestions I gave her. I believe they are applicable for patient experience leaders at any stage. First, leadership is not about years of experience. It’s about influence (and willingness to contribute). While healthcare has been around for centuries, a focused patient experience movement is still taking shape at all levels of healthcare organizations. To "plug in” and be a leader, you need to do one thing – share.

The power of sharing is what The Beryl Institute community is built upon and in doing so people reap even greater benefits themselves. Leadership in our movement is grounded in a generosity of spirit and contribution, collaboration and openness.

 The Beryl Institute offers many ways for you to share and be active participants in the patient experience movement.

  • Get engaged in the conversation. That's the best way to share what you're doing and learn from others. We have Patient Experience Leaders and Patient Advocacy listservs that are very active. Be sure to sign up for those and respond to questions and/or pose your own. And when you find something that’s successful in your organization – share it through a case study.

  • Attend a live event. We have a very engaged, energetic community and they love meeting and brainstorming with new people. It's also a great chance to find a mentor. We have two Regional Roundtables coming up in October - one in Boston and one in Seattle. And Patient Experience Conference 2015 will be April 8-10, 2015 in Dallas. If travel is a concern, you can talk to other members via phone on our monthly topic calls.

  • Immerse yourself in the PX Body of Knowledge (BOK). It's a community-driven framework highlighting the 15 domains critical for an effective PX leader. We currently have courses available for 8 of the 15 domains with the other 7 coming soon. You can gain lots of information from other resources available through your membership, but I always recommend the BOK courses to people looking to establish a solid foundation.

One of our members recently commented that he views his involvement with The Beryl Institute as much more than a membership. He believes his engagement is a bigger statement supporting the patient experience movement. His outlook exemplifies the passion we see everyday from the community.

In fact, I am constantly amazed by the eagerness of our members to contribute, get involved and truly become leaders in the movement. With over 60 members on our boards and councils, subgroups like the Patient Advocacy and Physician communities, and regular contributors to our guest blog, case studies and On the Road program, those desiring to be thought leaders in this critical movement have a place. You just need to choose to engage.

And for the many of you already involved in The Beryl Institute who want to do even more to support the movement, my advice to you is the same: share. One of the greatest ways to be a leader in the patient experience movement is to pass along a story, case study, research report or other resource that might inspire those around you to look at their roles differently, to see the impact they can have on creating the best possible experience for patients, families and caregivers. Simply, share. 

"Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap but by the seeds that you plant.”  - Robert Louis Stevenson


Stacy Palmer

Vice President, Strategy and Member Experience
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  community of practice  Field of Patient Experience  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  Leadership  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  service excellence  thought leadership 

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Why We are ALL the Patient Experience!

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D., Tuesday, June 3, 2014
Updated: Tuesday, June 3, 2014


"We are ALL the patient experience” is not just the theme that underlined Patient Experience Conference 2014; I would offer it is an idea that must be central to patient experience improvement and the patient experience movement overall. I am encouraged by the increasing acknowledgement that it takes all players in the healthcare marketplace, across the continuum, through the established hierarchies, and from patient & family, to caregiver, to community to ensure the best in experience.


This was exemplified during my On the Road visit just last week to Cape Regional Medical Center that will be published later this month. What I found was an institution that understood and acted fully on what community meant and, in doing so, engaged staff, physicians, leadership, patients and families in collective efforts to provide the best in experience.

I am often asked for the quick list of solutions to drive patient experience excellence or the checklist of actions that will lead straight to success. What my visit to Cape Regional reinforced, and what I have learned from so many other institutions, is that there is no one path to patient experience nirvana. Actually, I think we could all identify many core tactics that would help support improvement efforts. There are truly no secrets in this work (or at least there should not be). In fact I would challenge any organization that claims to have the secret recipe, be they provider or consultant, to examine what is truly distinct or unique about their efforts, and highlight, market and sell around that premise – not as an ultimate solution, but as a piece of an intricate puzzle. I believe there are practical ideas and innovative solutions we can learn from one another and, in fact, that is what I hope to reinforce.

A strong patient experience effort must be built on a patchwork of ideas, with a foundation of commitment across roles and responsibilities. While patient experience may be (and we encourage it should be) led by an individual or partnership of leaders, it can never be fully executed in isolation. In fact if we believe that at its core, experience is about the interactions that take place between two human beings around issues related to quality, safety, service and even improvement, then we must acknowledge the simple, yet powerful point that we are all the patient experience.

The implications for this understanding are significant and the imperative for supporting action is clear. Successful organizations driving patient experience improvement, and sustaining it, have worked hard to:

  • Develop and support leaders at all levels, in all roles, across all functions
  • Equip people with direct and easy access to the broadest amount of relevant and actionable information possible
  • Build solid partnerships with those they serve through active patient and community engagement
  • Build recognition and performance plans in direct alignment with experience objectives
  • Create a sense of shared ownership and reinforce accountability for ideas developed and actions taken

And the list could go on as you build an integrated effort.

You see, improving patient experience and the effort it requires must be owned by all and every individual most often impacts experience at the moment of a simple encounter. This means we must prepare these individuals to act. It is for this very reason that we introduced a simple, but comprehensive Institutional membership access to The Beryl Institute this year. This membership offers healthcare facilities of all sizes and purposes the broadest access for the most individuals in their organization. It provides information, education and accountability across the organization’s community. We have seen organizations with front line nurses to senior leaders and patient and family advisory council members to physicians engaged in accessing community resources and, in doing so, contributing strong ideas as well.

It is in our ability to engage the broadest range of voices through which we can find the best in experience outcomes. I encourage you to provide the opportunity for leadership to emerge, for new ideas to be fostered and for proven concepts to be shared. I know at the Institute we are committed to ensure you have the platform on which to build those efforts every day. Here is to all each individual contributes to the best in experience and for the rallying cry that moves us forward: We are ALL the Patient Experience!

Jason. A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute
  

Tags:  accountability  efforts  employee engagement  improving patient experience  Leadership  Patient Experience 

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Reigniting our Intention for Patient Experience Improvement

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, April 1, 2014

In just the last few days I had the privilege of spending time with the team at Cincinnati Children’s and then speaking with caregivers, staff, patients, family and community members as part of the Ontario Ministry of Health’s Central Local Health Integration Network Quality Symposium. While vastly different organizations and experiences that crossed an international border I was struck and even moved by the passion and commitment I see growing around the patient experience.

This is no better exemplified then by the growth of our community at The Beryl Institute and the efforts that have been inspired by each of you. The dialogue on patient experience improvement is growing, not just due to surveys, or even at-risk dollars (though we would be mistaken not to acknowledge its influence). It is not just driven by shifts in policy or even an emerging consumer mindset that has brought the concept of personal choice to healthcare decision-making. We may best describe it instead, by the "perfect storm” of personal awareness, professional passion, and external influence all culminating in this moment. And this is your moment as an individual committed to patient experience improvement.

This culmination guides what we have been inspired to create through our community and in the coming weeks will make available to support this powerful intention. My hope as a servant for the needs of the over 20,000 members and guests of The Beryl Institute and the countless others committed to this movement is that we provide the framework, resources, learning and connections to foster continuous motion.

We start in just a few days with Patient Experience Conference 2014, a physical gathering to engage with one another in learning, sharing, challenging and inspiring efforts. It will be soon followed by Patient Experience Week, a new annual event, inspired by members of the Institute community, to celebrate healthcare staff impacting patient experience. Taking pause during this week provides a focused time for organizations to celebrate accomplishments, reenergize efforts and honor the people who impact patient experience everyday.

In the midst of these major events, are two dynamic resources designed to support the very intention I see burgeoning. The first, the release of the initial Patient Experience Body of Knowledge learning modules, brings this community effort guided by almost 500 voices to its next stage, in providing core learning for current and aspiring patient experience professionals. From this focus on practice we will also see a push for greater research with the launch of Patient Experience Journal (PXJ) and its Inaugural Issue bringing together the voices of academic and practical research from around the world to inform and even challenge our work.

In the weeks ahead, and in the weeks and months beyond, our task together must be to refresh, renew and reignite our intention through these and other efforts. The task at hand may be no simpler, yet never more complex. Your work as champions of patient experience is a relentless effort of doing what is right in every moment. Consider this a rallying cry in a month where powerful people and strong efforts will collide in great possibility. So what can you do about it? I offer:

  1. Acknowledge that whatever role you play, what every title you hold, whatever resources may be at your call, you are a leader for patient experience improvement.
  2. Recognize that complexity may be our greatest foe in dealing with what at its core is our commitment as human beings caring for human beings – keep it simple, that is where great power can be found.
  3. Commit to engaging others in your efforts – be it the voices of patients and families, the insights from community, the experiences of peers or colleagues. While at times it may feel lonely on this journey, know there are so many more carrying this passion with you.
  4. Focus relentlessly on where you can make a difference; the operative concept being there is a place that each and every one of you has a difference to make.
  5. Don't let complacency be the enemy of your intention; yes there are now scores to earn, objectives to achieve, targets to shoot for, but don't be afraid to do what you know is right in the end.

The team at Cincinnati Children’s reinforced what I have seen on many On the Road visits and the participants in Ontario exemplified it in their efforts. We all have a vested interest in improving patient experience – be it for ourselves, our loved-ones, our friends, or our communities. This is a cause worth working towards and one in which I hope we will always remember the power of strong and true intention.

Jason. A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Organizational Effectiveness.

Tags:  body of knowledge  central LHIN  choice  Cincinatti Children's  culture  global healthcare  HCAHPS  healthcare  improving patient experience  intention  Leadership  patient  patient experience  Patient Experience Conference  patient experience journal  patient experience week  pxj 

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Nurse Leadership Matters in Patient Experience Performance

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D., Tuesday, March 4, 2014

As shared by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and known by many in practice, nurses represent the single largest group of health professionals who deliver hospital care. This represents a broad range of caregivers from the senior ranks of CEOs or CNOs, to the bedside, from managing triage in emergency departments to conducting post discharge follow-up calls.

With this expansive reach, nurses and in particular nurse leaders, have a significant opportunity to impact the experiences of patients and families. I say this reinforcing the strong point found in the definition of patient experience that experience is created in every interaction – meaning by everyone that plays a role in the healthcare system and at all points in the continuum of care, from well before to well after a clinical encounter. With that we would be short sighted to miss the fact that the experience most patients and family members relate to, reflect on and remember is the one they had with their nurses.

In a Hospital Impact blog last year, I wrote about my own experience of quickly leaving at the close of Patient Experience Conference to become a family member at the bedside for the birth of our son. I spoke of Kristen, our L&D nurse, who was responsive and took every opportunity to not only set appropriate expectations, but also answer our questions. She served as a guide through one of life’s most important and incredible moments.

In inquiring why she and other nurses in the unit were so positive and engaged (and not revealing my profession), I was told about how their leaders take time to support the nurse team not simply as individuals there to work, but as professionals, people and partners in care delivery.

In thinking back on this moment I had the chance to share some thoughts with the nurse leaders at my most recent On the Roadsite – Presbyterian Health Services. My realization in the conversations reminded me of how as a family member I had clear expectations about clinical excellence, quality and responsiveness from my nurse team. It was the things they did beyond that though that drove my experience.

As we talked at Presbyterian, it became clear in the dialogue that in the fast-paced world of healthcare, specifically in the nursing realm, nurse leaders have a critical role to play. They set the stage for behavior, they reinforce actions and responses, and they coach, guide, cajole and celebrate with their teams. In the end these nurse leaders, whether aware of it or not, are indirectly driving the experience for so many in their care.

This observation and discussion was supported by the data revealed in the 2013 State of Patient Experience Benchmarking Study. In both the 2011 and 2013 research "clinical managers who visibly support patient experience efforts” was the second greatest driver of experience success after visible support from the top. Here again leadership was reinforced as critical, and more so the clinical managers, those guiding the largest part of the healthcare workforce and with the greatest contact with those served, were identified as central to patient experience performance.

What does all this mean in action. Based on what I have experienced and learned from the many nurse leaders I have had the fortune to work with, the ideas are simple in concept, but sometimes require great effort to execute. Nurse leaders must:

  • Nurture and develop their teams beyond core clinical skills to the behaviors they see as critical to the total delivery of care.
  • Model expectations at all times in their own actions and hold themselves and everyone else accountable when these expectations are broken.
  • Listen and create a space for the words of all team members to be heard. Sometimes the greatest of ideas come from the unlikeliest of sources.
  • Reinforce and create a sense of ownership in staff at all levels that they are leaders in every moment. As every experience happens in the interaction between one human being and another, every individual has the power to choose how they lead in every moment.

In a world where nurse leadership faces continued and growing pressures to perform, these, what some might call, "softer”, non-clinical aspects of leadership and action can easily be pushed aside. But it continues to be the strongest and most successful leaders I see that find the space and time to consider and act on these aspects of the total experience.

It is simple. In whatever way fits their style or the organization in which they provide care, nurse leaders matter in patient experience performance. Of that there is truly no question.

Jason. A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute


In recognition of the importance of nurse leadership in impacting patient experience, The Beryl Institute is excited to join one of our supporting partners, TruthPoint, to offer patient experience resources at the upcoming American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE) Annual Meeting in Orlando, Florida.

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Healthcare Leadership and Management .

Tags:  celebration  Continuum of Care  culture  employee engagement  healthcare  improving patient experience  Leadership  Nurse  Nurse Leadership  Patient Experience  service excellence 

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The Patient Experience Must Be Owned By All: Welcoming the Society of Healthcare Consumer Advocacy

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Friday, November 22, 2013
Updated: Friday, November 22, 2013

In The Beryl Institute’s recent research report – The State of Patient Experience in American Hospitals 2013 – I noted in conclusion that the state of patient experience is growing stronger every day because of the many voices committed to this work. I too reinforced my belief that a patient experience movement is afoot, one that requires continuous and focused efforts and one that should be grounded in and built upon collaboration and alignment versus competition or the desire to stake a claim.

This idea rests at the very core of the global community of practice we have built at The Beryl Institute. We do not claim to own the patient experience, but rather to be a place where people can gather together to share what is best in what they are working to accomplish. Our philosophy has been and will remain that through collaboration not just great, but greater things can happen. 

It is in this very spirit of collaboration that I am excited to share the bridging of two great organizations to expand the alignment and dialogue on patient experience improvement. We have been in discussion with and will soon be welcoming the Society for Healthcare Consumer Advocacy (SHCA) into The Beryl Institute community. After an incredible 40 year history and supportive home with the American Hospital Association (AHA), our three organizations – The Beryl Institute, SCHA and AHA – saw great potential in supporting the next 40 years and beyond for SHCA within the Institute (You can read a letter from all of SHCA’s Past Board Presidents here). As of January 1, 2014, our communities will align to continue to expand the patient experience conversation and in doing so model the power of coming together in this critical dialogue.

More details will soon be available around this exciting next step in the history of focus on patient advocacy and more broadly patient experience improvement, but suffice it to say, the commitment to engaging all voices and growing those engaged in this important work is top of mind for us all. I am excited and proud to welcome the SHCA community to The Beryl Institute family as their new professional home and in doing so reiterate the very critical message I share here. That it is in coming together, not attempts at market distinction, in which the greatest outcomes are possible. 

I have watched in recent years as patient experience has moved from an emerging term to an active conversation at the center of policy and now financial focus. I have also seen a great game of ownership being played out. Much like one might have experienced during the gold rush, claiming their small bit of mountain stream to pan for hours, days or more in search of that one bright speck, many organizations – some well established, and some quite new – have all worked on positioning for their piece of the pie.

While I am a true believer in free enterprise and recognize the great potential for market savvy in this new world of healthcare, I also believe we have something bigger we are attempting to do in working towards patient experience excellence. It is in the bringing together of disparate thoughts or competing ideas, be they those of resource providers of similar services or healthcare organizations occupying the same market, in which the greatest outcomes can be realized. You see no one organization owns the patient experience, yet we in healthcare must all take ownership of it.

For this reason we have worked to bring the many voices together, for as I asserted above, this is where the strength of our work and its impact rests. This idea has been realized in the Institute’s Regional Roundtables where market "competitors” join together in sharing thoughts and crafting shared plans focused on improvement. It has been realized at Patient Experience Conference where numerous resource providers join in and engage in support of a true, independent community dialogue. It is seen in the willingness of some of the largest players in experience measurement to come together to share ideas between the covers of our soon to be released paper on the Voices of Measurement.

If we are to make the greatest differences in the lives of our patients, families, peers and community we must be open to the idea that above all else through collaboration and coordinated effort profound possibility exists for improvement and sustained impact. And while by my very words, I cannot claim The Beryl Institute is the only place this can or will be done, I do hope and in fact commit that we will continue to stand for the bringing together of all ideas, of every voice and of each hope in each and everything we do. As a community of practice it is our calling, at The Beryl Institute it is our cause and we are so very excited to see (and hopefully be a catalyst in) the patient experience family continuing to grow.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  Advocacy  AHA  body of knowledge  choice  community of practice  consumer advocacy  Continuum of Care  Field of Patient Experience  global healthcare  healthcare  Interactions  Leadership  patient advocac  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  perception  SHCA  thought leadership  voice 

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