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There will not be a “new normal” but rather a New Existence for healthcare and human experience

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, PhD, CPXP, Monday, May 11, 2020

It is hard to believe that it has been just over eight weeks since the COVID-19 crisis truly hit global proportion. On March 13, with soaring cases in Europe, Asia in lockdown and Africa, Australia and the Americas bracing for the wave, I offered in announcing the reformatting of Patient Experience Conference 2020, “We stand together to tackle this health crisis in a way that ensures the best outcomes, the greatest of dignity and respect, and the human experience it deserves.” I know we can say with confidence that in the weeks since that time, while they feel like years, the humanity at the heart of healthcare has shown its true power and unmistakable presence.

 

What this time has also shown us is that with challenges, we have responded with agility and speed to innovation. We too can also see that things will not be the same for a while and most likely forever. The idea has been proposed by some that we are entering a “new normal,” and while a term easy to grasp, there is nothing “normal” about what we are facing. Normal suggests a new “typical state or condition.” But the moment in which we find ourselves now and the moments to follow will not be steady. They will rapidly evolve and dynamically shift; we will ultimately find ourselves in a New Existence. Existence is not a state, but rather a way of living and being, driven by survival and a commitment to do what is right and true.

 

In this New Existence much of what we espoused and worked so hard to put in place in healthcare and for the human experience before this crisis will remain essential. At the same time, this moment has revealed cracks and systemic weaknesses for healthcare globally reinforcing the forward thinking that living in a New Existence will take. More so, there are actions that a New Existence has called on us to take already, will ask of us to reinforce and sustain and to create and evolve. For this reason, guided by the voices of our community at The Beryl Institute, we are undertaking the New Existence Project.

 

This effort is focused on generating what we think a New Existence will look like, what it will call on us to do in practice, process and policy and what it will ask of us as people in moving healthcare forward. The process will be one in which the voices of the community shape the ideas and outcomes. It will be informed by and aligned with the Future of Human Experience 2030 (HX2030) effort currently underway with the Institute. It will be built on the input of an international steering team with validation and input via community conversations and a global survey. It will ultimately work to align disparate efforts in collecting practices and process and advocating for policy and programs that will ensure the human experience at the heart of healthcare remains strong.

 

Some of the most practical efforts for a New Existence are clear and already in process in various forms. In particular for healthcare, we will be called to:

  • Rebuild consumer confidence and address the fears and needs of patients and families
  • Recharge our workforce to address issues of stress, trauma and burnout
  • Rebalance models of care where virtual care is more widely accepted and expected
  • Reinstate responsible access and visitation policies that balance clinical and personal needs
  • Refresh our capacity as we prepare for any resurgence of cases


And more ideas will emerge in these conversations as we get underway this week. We ask you to keep your eyes open for the opportunity to contribute soon.

 

I have always believed there are structural opportunities in healthcare that we have, in pieces and parts, been working to stitch together. This crisis has made those vulnerabilities real in ways that we can only say are heartbreaking. But from this tragedy, we can and will find and build on hope and possibility. That is what we intend to do as we look at a New Existence together.

 

Ultimately through our shared effort to co-create a New Existence, we will:

  • Ensure the voices of all engaged in healthcare are heard, respected and acted on for what matters to them
  • Advocate for and act to sustain practices, processes, and policies that have supported experience excellence
  • Address the systemic issues that undermine our capacity to support the health and well-being of all global citizens
  • Co-create a future in which new possibilities sprout from the deep roots of human experience

 

So, I ask you not to accept a new normal but stand for and act with us on a New Existence. Your voices, your ideas, your actions and your lessons already captured and learned will all contribute to an elevation of efforts committed to the humanity at the heart of healthcare. When we acknowledge that healthcare experience is all someone encounters from quality and safety, from service to spirituality, from billboards to billing and more, in all aspects of our care system, then we can truly walk forward together. Our shared commitment through this endeavor will ensure we do just that.

 

I hope you will join us on the journey.

 

UPDATES June 5, 2020

Listen to replay of the New Existence Community Conversation: https://www.theberylinstitute.org/page/CmmtyBriefing052920

Participate in the New Existence Global Inquiry (through June 12): https://theberylinstitute.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_1B60hb7kMCrEkol

 

 

Jason A. Wolf, PhD, CPXP
President & CEO
The Beryl Institute

 

Tags:  covid-19  existence  future  healthcare  human experience  hx2030  new existence  patient experience 

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5 Ways to Accelerate Your 2020 Experience Efforts

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Tuesday, January 14, 2020

I recently stumbled upon a list of New Year’s jokes. My favorite asked, ‘What’s the first thing you’ll say in 2021?’ The answer made me chuckle, ‘Hindsight is 20/20.’ I thought it was clever and kind of cute, but it also made me reflect on what I hope my hindsight on 2020 will be. And when we look back at this year, what do we hope 2020’s hindsight for patient experience will be?

In 2019, we saw great strides in the patient experience movement as we introduced the Experience Ecosystem highlighting the resources, associated organizations and solution providers supporting each of the eight strategic lenses of the Experience Framework. Also in 2019, our biennial State of Patient Experience benchmarking study revealed that patient experience efforts continue to mature and remain established within healthcare organizations. We saw a growing recognition that the types of organizations we build are foundational as people globally reinforced culture is vital in achieving positive experience efforts. Overall, 2019 marked a shift to patient experience not being something healthcare does but being who healthcare is.

When we look back at 2020, what will we have learned and accomplished? I believe that as a community we have built a foundation on which global experience efforts will continue to accelerate. As you plan for the new year, I offer some suggestions that may help accelerate your 2020 efforts as well:

  1. Acknowledge your organization’s strengths and opportunities. If you have not yet participated in an Organizational Experience Assessment, I encourage you to do so. The process is grounded in the Experience Framework and built on global research identifying factors seen as critical to positive experience outcomes by both high performing healthcare units and consumers of healthcare. Your assessment will provide a comprehensive picture of the strengths and opportunities you have in your efforts to improve the patient experience. 
  2. Enhance your team’s foundation in patient experience. When building a culture of patient experience excellence, it is essential to establish a foundation where all team members clearly understand what patient experience is, what it means to them and how they can positively impact experience excellence. Consider a program such as PX 101, a community-inspired resource for use in orientation programs and other staff education that shares patient experience knowledge on the front lines of care to positively impact experience outcomes.
  3. Celebrate your team’s patient experience efforts. Rewarding and recognizing great work is also an important component of building a culture of experience excellence. And the new year is a great time to evaluate, enhance or reinvigorate your internal recognition programs. Also, start planning now for Patient Experience Week 2020, April 27 – May 1. Patient Experience Week is an annual event providing a focused time to celebrate accomplishments, create enthusiasm and honor the people who impact patient experience every day. 
  4. Expand your personal patient experience network. One of the greatest benefits cited by members of The Beryl Institute is the power of the community – the ability to network, share and learn with others passionate about improving experience. Set aside designated time to follow and contribute to conversations on PX Connect where members share their experience challenges and successes. You will make new connections, learn from peers and help others by sharing your knowledge and expertise.
  5. Commit to your continued learning and professional development. Make it a priority in 2020 to seek knowledge that will advance your skills and best prepare you to impact experience efforts in your organization. Take advantage of membership benefits such as webinars, topic calls and publications. For more extensive learning, consider the PX Body of Knowledge courses which offer certificate programs in Patient Experience Leadership and Patient Advocacy. Also consider joining the over 1,100 individuals who have achieved Certified Patient Experience Professional (CPXP) designation offered through our sister organization, Patient Experience Institute. CPXP Prep Course workshops are available through The Beryl Institute to help you prepare.

Our commitment at The Beryl Institute is to support and elevate your efforts by continuing to offer the most relevant research, resources and connections. As such, our greatest hope for 2020 is that you will discover all the ways that the Institute can help you tap into this valuable and helpful collection of leading resources to kick-start innovation and build excitement in the new year. You can start by exploring one or all of the five ways mentioned above to enhance your own professional path as a leader and to accelerate your patient experience efforts as an organization.

We have tremendous respect and gratitude for the work happening globally each day to elevate the human experience in healthcare, and we will continue to provide a place for you to share, learn and celebrate together this year and into the future
When we get to 2021, we hope you will be proud of, and inspired by, the progress you accomplished this year. After all, hindsight will indeed be 20/20.

 

Stacy Palmer, CPXP
Senior Vice President & COO
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  celebration  choice  commitment  community of practice  culture  ecosystem  excellence  Field of Patient Experience  global healthcare  healthcare  improving patient experience  Leadership  member value  partnership  patient advocacy  patient advocate  Patient Experience  patient experience community  patient experience leadership  state of patient experience  team 

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An Orientation to Experience

Posted By Tiffany Christensen, CPXP, Monday, October 14, 2019

Some people will look at this picture and see a duck. Some will see a rabbit. The trick is that both are correct. The difference is how you are oriented to the picture. This is exactly the same in healthcare; we must always ask ourselves “How am I oriented?” (The duck-rabbit drawing was first used by American psychologist Joseph Jastrow in 1899)

At every moment of every healthcare interaction, there are two orientations at work: one of operationalizing experience and one of the personal experience of health/healthcare. Being oriented to operationalizing experience means you are thinking about things like whether or not:

  • The patient is being listened to by those caring for them and the organization as a whole
  • The patient/family is being spoken to in a way they can understand
  • The patient/family can easily find their way around the facility

Being oriented to the personal experience of health/healthcare may sound something like this:

  • “I am so tired and that walk from the parking lot was long. Will I have the energy after this appointment to make it back to my car?”
  • “What is that pain in my side? That wasn’t there yesterday. What does that mean? Is it worth mentioning it?”
  • “My dog is home alone. If they don’t finish tis appointment soon, I will need to just walk out.”

At some points along the way, these orientations compliment one another while, at other times, these dynamics appear to be completely discordant. The reality is that, either way, these dynamics can and MUST coexist. It is up to the healthcare professional to remain aware of how they are oriented—to operationalizing or to the personal experience--because both of these orientations are always present and are always appropriate.

To this end, The Beryl Institute is happy to share an extended version of The Experience Framework. The framework was built with the primary intention to help organize the areas of focus in examining and designing experience efforts. This, of course, is oriented to operationalizing experience.

The Beryl Institute’s Global Patient and Family Advisory Council has taken this framework and added the “personal experience of healthcare” orientation. We are excited to share this work as a companion to the “why” statements associated with The Experience Framework:

 

This is a great example of how ensuring any experience effort includes the sightline of those receiving care can provide balance and deeper meaning. When we orient ourselves to only one perspective, the rabbit or the duck, if you will, we may find ourselves missing out on meaningful perspectives that we need to inform and guide both organizations and individual interactions. We are so grateful to our Global Patient and Family Advisory Board for months of hard work that led to these illuminating statements regarding how each lens is EXPERIENCED by those receiving care.

We look forward to hearing from our community how they utilize this personal experience perceptive when operationalizing experience efforts! And, the next time you are working with a patient or designing the next experience/safety/quality improvement, ask yourself “how am I oriented?”

 

Tiffany Christensen, CPXP
Vice President, Experience Innovation
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  experience  global patient family advisory council  healthcare  orient 

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Healthcare’s 10 Year Challenge: Reflecting on the Past Decade in Patient Experience

Posted By Deanna Frings, Thursday, February 7, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, February 6, 2019

Recently Facebook challenged its users to post a current and a ten-year-old photo of themselves side by side. While I didn’t participate, seeing the many photos of those that accepted the challenge, did get me to think beyond what I looked like ten years ago to how much can really happen in a decade. I also heard a recent commentary by John Dickerson, co-host of CBS This Morning. His position was that reflecting back even a decade ago can interject perspective. What perspective can we gain by looking back and reflecting on the last 10 years in healthcare?

My first job in healthcare over 35 years ago was as a Respiratory Therapist. At that time, employees were still allowed to smoke at work. It wasn’t until 1991, the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) mandated that accredited hospitals go smoke-free by December 31, 1993. Talk about perspective.

Working in healthcare my entire career has come with many changes. Ten years ago, I was working for a large integrated healthcare system in southeast Wisconsin. It was another five years before I joined my colleagues at The Beryl Institute in the role of Director of Learning & Professional Development. My role within The Beryl Institute is not the only thing that has changed. The healthcare organization where I worked my entire career up until that point, doesn’t even exist today. It was sold and joined another organization approximately three years ago.

Looking at our past can bring perspective to the present and even give us hope for the future. Before becoming a member of The Beryl Institute in 2012 and attending my first Patient Experience Conference, I came across the Institute’s definition of patient experience. This community inspired and developed definition has stood the test of time and continues to be a core foundation in any conversation on patient experience. In fact, in the last 6 years US hospitals that now have a formal definition of patient experience has grown by 38%.

During my first conference experience with The Beryl Institute, I heard Tiffany Christensen share her powerful lived experience as a life-long cystic fibrosis patient having received two double lung transplants. Today, Tiffany is part of The Beryl Institute team in the role of Vice President of Experience Innovation and will be introducing the first inaugural Patient Experience Innovation Awards recipients at the Patient Experience Conference 2019 this April.

It was also during the 2012 conference that I was introduced to the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge Framework. While I had the responsibility within my organization leading efforts on experience, it was the first time I had seen a framework that outlined the knowledge and skills of healthcare leaders doing this work. This framework has guided the development of comprehensive learning opportunities including the ability to earn a   Certificate in Patient Experience Leadership and Patient Advocacy. Today over 470 individuals have earned one of these certificates. These milestones demonstrate not only the Institutes’ commitment to the field of patient experience but the growing commitment within healthcare organizations across the country on supporting the professional development of their leaders and continuing to engage in efforts that have resulted in innovation in this field of practice.

Related to this milestone and another example of how things have evolved over the past ten years is remembering how my journey as a patient experience professional started. Like many, I was invited to join a system-wide committee within my organization charged with improving our patient satisfaction scores. This was not an uncommon beginning. In fact, when we first asked the question, Who in your organization has the primary responsibility and direct accountability for addressing patient experience” (State of Patient Experience 2011), 42% of the respondents indicated it was by committee and only 13% had a dedicated individual leading their efforts. Since 2011, we have seen a significant increase in organizations reporting they now have a specific person in a dedicated patient experience role. In fact, 70% of US hospitals that responded to the study, now identify having a senior leader with this responsibility.

As I continue to reflect on the past ten years in healthcare and the patient experience movement specifically, something that is becoming more and more common today that was not seen ten years ago are individuals with the credentials of CPXP behind their names. CPXPs or Certified Patient Experience Professionals is a relatively new phenomenon in our industry thanks to our community and our sister organization, Patient Experience Institute for developing a path to certification. This endeavor has brought a level of rigor and credibility to the field not seen in the recent past. According to PXI, today, over 860 individuals now hold the designation of CPXP.

So much has happened in a decade with so much more to do. The ten-year challenge is definitely more than comparing two photographs from then and now. In this age of social media which brings the dynamic of immediacy, pausing and reflecting back does interject a perspective that reacting to the immediate can never do.

For example, the inaugural study, Consumer Perspectives on Patient Experience 2018 was an incredible journey into the lens of consumers across the globe and their view on patient experience.  It profoundly reinforces that human interactions are most important when assessing their experience. That patient experience encompasses quality, safety, service and all that is experienced in any given health encounter. For those of us doing this work for a long time, on the surface, these two ideas might not seem like huge revelations but when we think about the conversations, we were having just ten years ago, these two ideas, that have become foundational cornerstones in the work of experience today, were still forming thoughts in our recent past.

Taking a snapshot of a moment in time can tell a powerful story but being intentional and purposeful of how we choose to move in the world will ensure we pass the next ten-year challenge. What are your hopes for the next decade? More importantly, what wisdom today will guide our actions tomorrow to ensure that the future of healthcare is what we know it can be?

 

Deanna Frings, MS Ed, CPXP
Vice President, Learning and Professional Development
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  body of knowledge  certificate  definition  healthcare  human experience  intentional  patient advocacy  patient experience conference  patient experience leadership  perspective  purposeful  pxi 

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5 Ways to Impact Your Patient Experience Success in 2019

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Monday, January 7, 2019
Updated: Monday, January 7, 2019

Embarking on a New Year tends to bring forth much reflection and anticipation. While 2018 was often shadowed by political tensions and shifting pressures on our healthcare systems globally, it was also a year of significant reinforcement of the value and purpose of the patient experience movement. 

We introduced two new research studies at The Beryl Institute in 2018, both intended to help validate and focus the patient experience field. A study on Consumer Perspectives on Patient Experience confirmed that 91% of consumers believe patient experience is extremely or very important and will be significant to the healthcare decisions they will make. And most recently, we published To Care is Human, exploring the factors influencing experience in healthcare today and reinforcing the relational nature where healthcare is grounded in human beings caring for human beings. 

As we begin 2019, I believe the patient experience movement is better prepared than ever to accelerate its efforts. And as your organization embarks on the new year, I encourage you to consider a few suggestions that have potential to positively impact your success:

  • Evaluate Your Strengths and Opportunities – As you reflect on the direction your PX journey took in the past year and plan for future success, I encourage you to take time to examine where your organization excels and where you have opportunities to grow. The Beryl Institute’s Experience Framework identifies the strategic areas through which any experience endeavor should be framed, provides a means to evaluate where you are excelling or may have opportunities for improvement and offers a practical application to align knowledge, resources and solutions. If you find there are areas of great strength for your organization, let us know so we can share your successes with the community. And if you identify potential opportunities in your journey, contact us and we’ll help you navigate the many resources available in the Institute’s library of content. To further assist the overall community, we’ll also begin highlighting a new strategic lens each month, offering new webinars and other programming around that lens and curating a selection of resources to help you amplify your efforts in that area.

  • Enhance Your Organization's Foundation in Patient Experience – When building a culture of patient experience excellence, it is essential to establish a foundation where all team members clearly understand what patient experience is, what it means to them and how they can positively impact experience excellence. Consider ways in which you can share patient experience knowledge on the front lines of care to positively impact experience outcomes. Last year the Institute introduced PX 101, a community-inspired and developed resource for use in orientation programs and other staff education. While not intended to be used in isolation or as a stand-alone resource, PX 101 can enhance your journey by distilling the resources and knowledge available via the Institute into practical, transferable learning to support your larger patient experience training strategy. 

  • Celebrate Your Patient Experience Efforts – Wherever you are in your journey, it’s important to recognize successes and commitment. Not only does this offer a chance to celebrate great work, it also provides an opportunity to reinforce the significance and impact of your efforts. Start planning now for Patient Experience Week 2019: April 22 - April 26. Patient Experience Week is an annual event to celebrate healthcare staff impacting patient experience. Inspired by members of the Institute, it provides a focused time to celebrate accomplishments, create enthusiasm and honor the people who impact patient experience everyday. 

While I believe the suggestions above can have great impact on your organization’s patient experience focus, I encourage you to be just as thoughtful in developing your own growth plan for the new year. We likely all have personal resolutions around health, fitness, finances, etc., but it’s important to also consider ways we can grow professionally as patient experience leaders. Whether you’re looking to make a career move in 2019 or build knowledge and value in your current role, consider these key steps to impact your success: 

  • Expand Your Patient Experience Network – One of the greatest benefits cited by members of The Beryl Institute is the power of the community – the ability to network, share and learn with others passionate about improving experience. Make a commitment now to attend Patient Experience Conference 2019 to be held April 3-5 at the Hyatt Regency Dallas. It’s the largest independent, non-provider or vendor hosted event bringing together the collective voices of healthcare professionals across the globe to expand the dialogue on improving patient experience, and you’re sure to leave with new information, inspiration and connections. 

  • Distinguish Yourself as an Expert in Patient Experience Performance – The best way to impact your professional success is to ensure you have the knowledge and tools necessary to succeed in today's healthcare environment. Through PX Body of Knowledge courses, The Beryl Institute offers certificate programs in Patient Experience Leadership and Patient Advocacy. With over 440 certificate program recipients to date, the PX Body of Knowledge frames the field of patient experience, defines its core ideas and provides a clear foundation of knowledge that supports the consistent and continuous development of current and future leaders in the field. Also consider earning your formal certification as a Certified Patient Experience Professional (CPXP) which is awarded through successful completion of the CPXP examination, offered through our sister organization, Patient Experience Institute. CPXP Prep Course workshops are available through The Beryl Institute to help you prepare.
At the Institute, our 2019 commitment to you is that we will continue seeking ways to support and elevate your efforts through offering the most relevant research, resources and connections – and by helping you to easily navigate these offerings. We have tremendous respect and gratitude for the work happening globally each day to improve experiences for patients, families and caregivers, and we will continue to provide a place for our community to share, learn, celebrate and inspire together.

If you have specific needs we can assist with as you embark on your 2019 organizational or personal PX journey, please let us know. We’re here to help!

Stacy Palmer, CPXP
Senior Vice President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  accountability  body of knowledge  celebration  collaboration  community  community of practice  connection  culture  Field of Patient Experience  global healthcare  healthcare  Human Experience  improving patient experience  Leadership  member benefit  member value  movement  Patient Experience  patient experience community  patient experience week 

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Experience Innovation: Connecting Motive to People and People to Action

Posted By Tiffany Christensen, Tuesday, November 13, 2018
Updated: Tuesday, November 13, 2018

As the VP of Experience Innovation at The Beryl Institute, it seems quite logical (and necessary) for me to have a clear understanding of how to define innovation in the Field of Patient Experience. Since I have just celebrated my one-year anniversary at The Beryl Institute, I thought this might be the right time to share my perspective on what we mean when we say “Experience Innovation.” 

At its core, innovation requires creating something new or changing something that already exists so that it becomes new/improved. By this framing, we can safely say innovation permeates experience efforts across all aspects of the Experience Field. Perhaps more important than defining Experience Innovation, however, is determining the motive and method for innovation. 

IDENTIFYING MOTIVES BY UNDERSTANDING WHO WILL BE IMPACTED

Healthcare is competitive. Even in the Field of Patient Experience, we see organizations and individuals striving for recognition and advancement. At times, the motive for innovation might be driven more by a desire to stand out. In some cases, innovations are designed for the sake of being innovative. For these and other reasons, we must closely examine if the motive for innovation is directly tied to being helpful to a PERSON or GROUP of people. Innovations without a clear connection to the people potentially served, at the very least, run the risk of wasting effort/resources or, in the worst case scenario, creating harmful innovations. 

The first step in examining an innovation’s motive involves becoming clear about who will be impacted by the innovation. This requires an in-depth understanding of the experiences of the “end-users” (to borrow a Human Centered Design term). In healthcare, the “end user” is often a patient but it is certainly not limited to patients and families.  

Once the “end-user(s)” are clearly defined, it is important to ask a few basic questions:

  1. Do we know the problem we are trying to solve is a) really a problem and b) is a priority for those impacted?
  2. Have we gathered sufficient data from those we plan to help to a) understand their experiences and b) ask them if our innovation would potentially make their experience better?

After these questions have been answered we can then begin to walk through ow the innovation is directly tied to being helpful to a PERSON or GROUP of people. One possible way of doing this is by pulling in the Model for Improvement. While this approach is a widely recognized step-by-step way of improving safety and quality in healthcare, for some reason, this model is applied to experience improvement far less often. Because we have a large and diverse toolbox filled with potential tactics for change, we want to be sure we are not using an “innovation for innovation sake” approach but, rather, building an innovative strategy to help people by addressing a specifically identified need. Using something like the Model for Improvement can help guide the discovery of the “why” before the “how”. 

KNOWING THE “WHY” BEFORE CONSIDERING THE “HOW”

For organizations working to find strategies that enable them to hear the voice of their patients and families, finding a structure to do so is innovative and met with enthusiasm. 

A Patient and Family Advisory Council (PFAC) is a well-known, widely accepted strategy with low risk to the organization. For these and other reasons, PFACs are often the first choice for partnering with the community. Despite the popularity and comfortability, in some cases, organizations are surprised to find the PFAC’s administrative lift is too heavy or the community itself is not interested in engaging with their local healthcare organization in that way. Such a discovery may be followed by a revisioning of the goals for the PFAC and, in some cases, the choice is made to use an entirely different partnership strategy. In either case, the time spent running a PFAC without clear aim was potentially wasteful and frustrating. 

In instances like these, it was recognized far down the road that there was not a clear vision for the “why” but, rather, only a focus on “how” to build and implement the strategy.

Rather than starting out by choosing an innovative strategy (like building a PFAC), we can begin by getting clear about the desired improvement to experience. Moving forward, it is important to know a few basic things:

  1. What are we trying to accomplish with this innovation? How will it help people?
  2.  How will we know we have helped people?
  3.  What strategy will we choose to improve the experience? (Included in this might be “how will we learn from the Experience Community about all of the potential solutions we have to choose from?”)

Once you are clear about the people who you plan to help and the way their experience will be better through this innovation, you can decide if the motive for the innovation is a healthy one.

So, how do I define Experience Innovation? Amazingly, even after a year of thinking about it, the complete definition is still coming into focus. The more time I spend at The Beryl Institute, the more I am excited by the nuances of both language and operationalization required to describe it. My hope is to share my personal definition of Experience Innovation at my 2-year anniversary with The Beryl Institute! 

For now, what I know for sure, is how to define what constitutes the spine of Experience Innovation. Before we can innovate in any meaningful way, we must, like vertebrae, connect motive to people and people to action. I visualize this as “the Backbone of Experience Innovation.” When healthy, this is what makes innovation strong, enabling it to move nimbly forward. I define this backbone as being: 

Thoughts, actions and designs driven by a deep understanding of the lived experiences in healthcare that result in improvements created to address the most urgent needs. 

 

Tiffany Christensen, CPXP
Vice President, Experience Innovation
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  Advocacy  healthcare  improving patient experience  patient and family  Patient Experience  perspective 

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When Work Has Meaning

Posted By Deanna Frings, Tuesday, July 10, 2018
Updated: Friday, July 6, 2018

The title of this blog is not original to me but was a headline on the cover of the July-August 2018 issue of Harvard Business Review (HBR) referencing an article, Creating A Purpose-Driven Organization. It seems everywhere I turn, there is another book, article or referenced research on the neuroscience of purpose as a driving force that gives our lives meaning. And let me be clear, I love that there is currently an abundance of discussion on purpose and meaning. 

 

I have worked in healthcare my entire career from being on the front line as a respiratory therapist, leading teams in multiple leadership capacities to my current role as Vice President of Learning and Professional Development of The Beryl Institute. From my experience, conversations on meaning and purpose are not uncommon in the field of healthcare. I don’t know, maybe it’s because those of us who work in healthcare can easily connect that what we do really matters? We save lives. But how is this knowledge being lived out in our day to day practice as leaders in healthcare. Are we creating cultures that facilitate a discovery of purpose for ourselves and our employees? 

 

Organizations are focused on employee engagement and acknowledge its critical role in their experience efforts as reported in our, State of Patient Experience 2017: A Return to Purpose. And, it’s not surprising given the 2017 Gallup State of American Workplace report, that only 33% of employees are engaged in their work and workplace and only 21% of employees strongly agree their performance is managed in a way that motivates them to do outstanding work. 

These startling figures are not a new phenomenon. Previous Gallup Reports have shown much of the same. So, while we acknowledge the importance of an engaged workforce, the data suggests we continue to struggle, despite all the focus on improving it. 

I often speak on the critical role of leaders in achieving experience excellence and I would suggest that leadership is the critical link in transforming organizational cultures and creating engaged environments where individuals can reach their full potential. During these speaking engagements and workshops, I love taking people through a journey of discovery of purpose and meaning and I have witnessed the immediate and powerful impact it has. I hear a higher level of excitement in their voices, a clarity in vision and a drive in their commitment as they share their stories with each other. 

The conversation continues as we take the critical next step and determine actions we, as leaders, can take to not only share our purpose but invite employees to do the same. It’s one way to connect people to purpose. Simply stated in the HBR article, leaders most important role is to connect people to purpose.

Acting on a higher purpose can often motivate us to learn and develop our skills so we can excel in our performance contributing to what’s meaningful to us. It’s one reason I’m excited about Patient Experience 101(PX 101), a new educational resource releasing next week from The Beryl Institute. PX 101 is a comprehensive community-inspired and developed resource to build patient experience knowledge and skill for all employees across an organization by taking individuals through a discovery of purpose. It’s one of several new opportunities we’re launching this year in an effort to support global patient experience efforts based on the needs of our community. 

PX 101 offers the tools and activities you need to engage in deeper and authentic conversations on what patient experience is, what it means to your employees and how they positively impact experience excellence. It invites them to share their own accounts of how they make a positive difference resulting in a stronger sense of purpose and meaning to the work they do every day. 

 

When we find meaning and purpose in our work, the sky’s the limit to how high we can soar and how much we can contribute to our individual and organization’s success.  

As leaders in healthcare striving for excellence in experience, how do you connect people to purpose?


Deanna Frings, MS Ed, CPXP
Vice President, Learning and Professional Development
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  choice  compassion  culture  employee engagement  healthcare  improving patient experience  leadership  Patient Experience  personal experience  perspective  purpose 

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A New View: An Unwavering Commitment to the Human Experience in Healthcare

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Thursday, August 3, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, August 1, 2017

This month’s Patient Experience blog is an excerpt from the recently released research report, The State of Patient Experience 2017: A Return to Purpose.

We have always maintained that in patient experience there are no major secrets and with that believe strongly that the differentiator is not in the private processes you create or the proprietary models an organization might produce. Rather it is in the spirit of an open sharing of ideas through which all should play and in the distinction of a true commitment to execution through which you should compete. Experience will be and is already emerging as a key, if not the primary, differentiator in healthcare. The opportunity in front of each organization is how they will seize this moment.

For us at the Institute, part of this moment is to acknowledge that patient experience will forever be central to healthcare, but also as we learn from the community and from the very data in this year’s benchmarking study the healthcare experience we are speaking to reaches beyond patient experience itself. In an environment where we clearly base all work on human beings caring for human beings we are ultimately addressing and impacting the human experience in our midst. For this reason, we believe at The Beryl Institute as we remain committed to patient experience we must address the reality of the human experience that is central to healthcare overall.

With this, we have set a bold and fundamental desired impact for how we look to move into the years ahead. Our intended focus is simple, clear and true:

Changing healthcare by advancing an unwavering commitment to the human experience.

In doing this we honor the work each of you are doing and the reality of the healthcare world we find ourselves collectively creating around the globe. In a commitment to shift how healthcare works, we must dedicate ourselves to the broader human experience, honoring both the patient experience at its core and the experience of all driving and supporting healthcare’s efforts every day. With that we believe this commitment must be grounded on four key points:

  • Understanding experience is defined as the sum of all interactions shaped by an organization’s culture, that influence patient perceptions across the continuum of care.
  • Acknowledging experience (1) encompasses the critical elements of healthcare from quality, safety and service, to cost and population health issues that drive decisions, impact access and ensure equity and (2) reaches beyond the clinical encounter to all interactions one has with the healthcare system.
  • Recognizing that human experience reinforces the fundamental principle of partnership and is therefore inclusive of the experiences of those receiving and delivering care as well as all who support them.
  • Reinforcing that focused action on experience drives positive clinical outcomes, strong financial results, clear consumer loyalty, solid community reputation and broad staff and patient/family engagement.

This commitment has been spurred by all we have seen in this work and by all each member of the broader patient experience community has taught us. As we travel a journey to reinforce the critical role of the human experience in healthcare all that we learned in this year’s study takes on even greater relevance.

We must strive for what we believe is important collectively and then ensure we find ways in each and every one of our organizations to apply these principles, practices, ideas and findings for the good of all engaged. This is not idealism, but rather a practical reflection on where we are and what we can achieve. The state of patient experience is about much more than what we have or will do, to what we are and what we can become. That is the inspiration we glean from those that contributed their voices in this year’s study and the motivation we garner from working collectively as a community dedicated to the human experience in healthcare.

The state of patient experience is strong, your efforts and commitment are true and the possibilities of all we can accomplish as a result are yet to be realized. That makes this perhaps one of the most exciting times to be committed to this work. We look forward to traveling the next steps of this journey with each of you.

> Download the full State of Patient Experience 2017 research report


Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., CPXP

President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  community of practice  culture  global healthcare  healthcare  Human Experience  Patient Experience 

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We the People: Why Patient Experience Must Be the Foundation of Healthcare Policy

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Thursday, July 6, 2017
Updated: Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Two things have become central to all I see, say and share in engaging in discussions on the patient experience globally: one, that ALL voices matter, and two, that in healthcare we are human beings caring for human beings. These ideas while simple in concept also provide for all that is complex in healthcare. They have implications in both the delivery of care and in the design of the policies and systems that support the delivery of care.

As we think about the delivery of care, the provision of care at a personal level, the idea of experience – of quality, safe and service focused encounters grounded in dignity and respect and driven by communication, partnership and knowledge – is a natural fit. As citizens of our planet, as people who choose our points of focus from ideals, beliefs and/or faith, we have been taught and encouraged to treat others as we hope to be treated and to act with compassion as we engage in caring for others.

Yet, as we get to the level of policy and the systems that both support and yes, constrain, our capacity to create environments of caring, we have a much greater opportunity. In instilling the ideas of all voices, not only do we add perspective, but we by default introduce potentially perpendicular ideas. As we author policy and adapt structures that circumscribe the humanity at the heart of healthcare, we create both clearer pathways and opportunities for obstacles. It is in the midst of this noise that we must find and mold the material needed to positively frame the human experience in healthcare.

It is pertinent to explore this idea during a week where we saw both Canada Day in Canada and Independence Day in the United States. As we explore the roots of these two great democracies, or of any democratic society around the world, there may be no more important concept than the first three words found in the United States Constitution – We the People. Democracies by their very nature favor equal rights, freedom of speech and support the ability to raise conflicting perspectives. Therefore democracy, the idea of citizenship, of partnership, of equality, underlines the idea at the core of patient experience that all voices matter. Yet often, for people of all political beliefs and perspectives, for those who engage in healthcare from the aging, to those with chronic disease, family caregivers, to concerned parents and even for those who have yet to have a serious medical encounter, it feels as if the “system” and the policies that dictate its actions have forgotten them.

This idea that We the People have a voice that matters in healthcare is more relevant now than in any other time, not just in this period of policy change in the United States, but in how people view healthcare globally. This understanding of the criticality of the moment spurred a call to action by a group of committed leaders who have been listening to patients and peers, leaders and policy makers and recognized a great opportunity existed. If efforts were going to be more than just claiming to be “patient centric” and instead actually worked to engage the voices that are impacted by policy itself, then voices had to be raised, issues identified and actions taken.

This belief led to the initial idea of what has emerged as the Patient Experience Policy Forum (PXPF). The PXPF originated in 2016 through a series of conversations among a group of patient experience leaders and patient and family advocates who recognized the growing imperative to influence and help shape policy at the national and state levels on issues that directly affect the patient and family experience. The group and a growing number of individuals who have fostered its initial growth believed it was time to move the conversation on experience excellence beyond practice to address the policies and systems that were impediments to and encourage and support those that were supportive of the very principles all strive for in delivering care.

PXPF has quickly moved from concept to reality in establishing itself as a broad-based coalition of organizations and individuals engaged in advocacy and action to give a greater voice in healthcare policy to those working to improve the patient and family experience. It just announced last week that it will hold its inaugural meeting this September 19, 2017 in Washington, DC. PXPF will be working to advocate for policies and systems that will:

  • Advance Patient and Family Partnership
  • Elevate the Value Case
  • Improve Patient-Centered Measurement and Reporting
  • Strengthen Systems for Patient Involvement
  • Expand Professional Education and Support
  • Reduce Disparities

I invite you to explore the inaugural event of PXPF, share this opportunity with your peers and consider ways in which you can engage either in person or in an ongoing nature.

There is a reality in healthcare that we cannot overlook. That for as much as the conversation today, especially in the United States, is about the issues and challenges of insurance companies and/or constraints placed on provider organizations, those impacted by policy, especially those experiencing healthcare itself must not be left from this conversation. There are many organizations today doing great work advocating for specific diseases or segments of the population, but what is deemed missing is the idea that at the heart of all we do in healthcare, we must return to the human experience. If we believe fundamentally that caring for our fellow citizens, and in particular their health, matters, if we believe that ‘We the People’ matters, then we cannot waver in ensuring that patient experience must be the foundation of healthcare policy. I hope you will join us in this endeavor.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., CPXP
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  equity  experience era  healthcare  healthcare policy  improving patient experience  Patient Experience  patient experience policy forum  PXPF 

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There’s No Place like Home…The Value of Connecting with Your Patient Experience Community

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Tuesday, June 13, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, June 13, 2017

I recently chatted with one of our members after she returned from another healthcare conference. While she enjoyed the event, she shared that the experience itself felt dramatically different than her time at our March Patient Experience Conference in Denver. I asked a few questions to try to understand what the difference was. The breakout sessions were great, the keynote speakers were inspiring, and it was a large crowd of other leaders in similar types of roles. Yet, she still felt something was lacking. Upon further reflection, she realized the missing element was the sense of community and emotional connection she experiences every year at The Beryl Institute conference.

Her comments reinforced feedback received after this year’s Patient Experience Conference. Participants said things such as, “Everyone was so kind and helpful…it was easy to meet people…it was so wonderful to be surrounded by like-minded people…we're all in this together!” These statements reflect things we hear often at the Institute, an appreciation for the welcoming and engaging community that has developed through a shared passion for building and sustaining the patient experience movement. 

Our community connects in many ways throughout the year – chatter on social media, regular discussions on listservs, and conversations through Topic Calls and Patient Advocacy Connection Calls. In recent months, we’ve also enjoyed watching dialogue between members explode in the chat box of our regular webinars where participants share where they’re logging in from, reconnect with old friends and tap into the tremendous wealth of knowledge that is represented in this patient experience community.

The virtual connections are powerful and a hallmark of The Beryl Institute. While these opportunities are invaluable, I would argue there is no replacement for spending time together in person. As the patient experience movement has grown, we’ve witnessed incredible connections between the leaders doing this work and an amazing energy and enthusiasm that comes when we gather together to share ideas, connect and learn. Our community believes patient experience is a foundational element of the overall healthcare experience, and there is something about getting together in person that inspires us to live and share that message.

At The Beryl Institute we continue to foster opportunities for face-to-face connections. Last week we announced the opening of the Call for Submissions for breakout sessions at Patient Experience Conference 2018 to be held April 16-18 in Chicago. We hope you will join us there and even consider submitting a proposal to share your patient experience successes.
 
But even before then we have many opportunities for you to engage face-to-face with patient experience peers. This fall we’ll hold Patient Experience Regional Roundtables in Canada, California, Louisiana and New York. Regional Roundtables are one-day programs bringing together the voices of healthcare leaders, staff, physicians, patients and families to convene, engage and expand the dialogue on improving patient experience. Through inspiring keynote sessions and working group discussion, participants leave with an expanded network, renewed energy and actionable ideas to support patient experience efforts in their own organizations.

We also have two upcoming Certified Patient Experience Professional (CPXP) preparation workshops. These are opportunities to gather with other patient experience leaders to not only network and share, but to prepare together for the CPXP exam. Community members will gather later this month in Chicago and in September in Los Angeles for full day courses reviewing the domains outlined in the job classification on which the CPXP examination is based. 

The Beryl Institute continues to be the global community of practice dedicated to improving the patient experience through collaboration and shared knowledge. We are a welcoming and engaging community. I am often reminded of an early Patient Experience Conference where a participant stood up and joyfully proclaimed “I have found my professional home!”  As a leader in the movement, we hope you view the Institute as your professional home, and we invite you to further connect with your patient experience family. 


Stacy Palmer, CPXP
Senior Vice President
The Beryl Institute 

Tags:  community of practice  Field of Patient Experience  healthcare  improving patient experience  leadership  networking  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  thought leadership 

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