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Don’t Underestimate the Importance of the Small Things

Posted By Deanna Frings, MS Ed, CPXP, Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Recently I traveled by motorcycle through my home state of Wisconsin enjoying the colors of fall. In planning this trip my husband and I were very intentional in choosing our route, selecting our clothes and determining the day we left.  We knew that paying close attention to these things was very important if we wanted to see the best color possible on the most scenic roads staying warm, dry and safe.

I would categorize these items as having a great impact on the overall quality and safety of our experience.  Many might say, they are the big important things.  In healthcare, there are many big important things in providing high quality, safe care.  And in my experience, we are typically very good at paying attention to these big, important things.

But what was affirmed for me during this trip is that doing things with a clear purpose, being present and intentional can have an equally huge impact on the overall experience even in the most insignificant interactions.  In fact, it is the small things that can often have the greatest positive impact.

When riding on the back of a motor cycle there isn’t much for me to do except to enjoy the scenery. My mind wondered a bit and I started thinking of the importance of being intentional.  Intentional in my work, intentional in my personal life and intentional in my relationships and all that I do.  It’s easy to get lazy and forget the importance and the impact intention can have on oneself and on others. It really does come down to presence, awareness and the power of choice.

At The Beryl Institute, we understand the power of choice and recognize that in every interaction, we have a choice to make. So, for the remainder of the trip it was my goal to create positive moments by being very intentional in the interactions I had. The criteria I used to measure my success included receiving a comment of appreciation such as a “Thank you”, noting a smile as a result of the interaction and/or walking away with an overall positive and warm feeling.

We came upon road construction several times throughout the week. On many of these occasions, the road merged into a single lane which required members of the construction crew to flag vehicles through from each direction ensuring our safety. At more than one of these locations, we were the first vehicle stopped by a person holding a stop sign waiting patiently for our turn to pass through.

I have always wondered what it must be like to be one of these individuals standing in the elements for several hours a day holding a ten foot stop sign. There have been a few occasions when I would nod slightly but on this occasion, I wanted to acknowledge the person and to let them know how much I appreciated the job they did to ensure our safety. On a motorcycle, it was very easy to have this conversation. I could see a smile come across the gentleman’s face and he nodded. As we passed through, he waved and said, “Have a great and safe ride.” This small but purposeful gesture, created a moment that enhanced this part of our journey.

Test number two came when we stopped for lunch. On a motorcycle trip of this length, stopping for lunch is a highlight of the day. Its time off the bike and that is always welcomed. It’s fun to stop at simple cafes and dinners and this particular stop was extremely enjoyable.  Not so much because of the food but rather our waitress who was extremely personable and good at what she did. I have always enjoyed watching people do what they do every day especially when you can tell they enjoy their work. 

She had purpose, presence and did everything with intention. It was fun watching her work the room. She acknowledged us the minute we sat down and indicated she would be with us in a just a moment. As promised, she came over immediately after delivering hot food to another table, introduced herself and seeing the clothing we were wearing and our helmets asked, “are you staying warm out there today?” She was helpful with the menu, anticipated all of our needs and provided us with a lovely 45-minute break off the bike.

As she was cleaning the dirty dishes from the table and leaving us the check, I asked her how long she had worked here and told her how much I enjoyed watching her as it appears she really enjoys her work. She was beaming at this acknowledgment and went on to share that it brings great joy to her when she can offer great service to her customers and thanked us for coming in today.

The final experiment came during a service recovery opportunity after being on the bike for a long 6-hour day. Upon entering the parking lot of our hotel, we were required to take a parking ticket from an automated machine that would subsequently open the gate. As we started moving through the gate, it immediately lowered itself onto the motorcycle prior to us passing completely through. It took all my husband’s strength to stop the gate from lowering all the way onto the bike and for those brief 20 seconds until I hit the button for another ticket, it was a bit terrifying. Not the most comforting way to end the day. 

We were greeted by a very nice young man at the registration desk. He noticed we were a bit distressed and inquired how he could help. After hearing our explanation about the gate prematurely closing, he did all the right things you would hope an employee would do at a time when service recovery is warranted.  He acknowledged our concern, apologized it happened and immediately went to work to make amends. As he completed the registration process, he once again apologized for this situation. We thanked him for his help.

Later in the evening when we came down to dinner, I wanted to once again acknowledge how much what he did meant to us. I proceeded to the desk to explain to him what I did at The Beryl Institute and how much we talk about the importance of service recovery.  The term was new to him but he really appreciated that I took the time to share this information and to thank him once again.  As I walked away, I turned back and he was fast at work welcoming another couple to the hotel with a great smile on his face.

Sometimes we never know the impact a small gesture might have.

Four years ago, I met a gentleman by the name of Andreas. At that time, he was a student at DePaul University. Jason Wolf was participating in a patient experience panel discussion for the class. Following the class, we joined the students for a light meal and further networking. Andreas was sharing how much he was learning about patient experience and his desire to ultimately find a job in the field but was concerned about his lack of work experience. During our conversation, I was very impressed with this young man. He had a clear vision, defined purpose and he was building an intentional plan to achieve his goal. And from where I was sitting, he had a true passion about patient experience. It was this that I wanted to reflect back to him. I simply put my hand on his shoulder and said, “Andreas, you are the Patient Experience;” I took one of our IMPX pins and secured it to his jacket.  He simply smiled and said, “Thank you”. 

Four years later, Andreas along with his colleagues presented at the Patient Experience Conference. Andreas came up to me during the conference and recounted that evening four years earlier and shared with me how much it meant to him. It gave him continued confidence to work toward his goal of working in the field of experience. I also noticed he was wearing his IMPX pin.

It was hard to hold back my tears. To think of the impact that small gesture had and the vivid memory it still holds was humbling. But you see, we all know because of our own experiences the positive and lasting impact these small gestures can have. Leading with purpose, being present and doing things with intention can positively impact both the big and small things in our everyday interactions.

In conclusion, I encourage you to think about these simple examples and the lasting impact they had on these individuals as well as the positive impact they had on me. There is an important conversation going on in the patient experience community about employee engagement. At the heart of our humanness, it is being in relationship with each other that keeps us engaged in caring for those we serve. And it’s all big and important stuff.

 

Deanna Frings, MS Ed, CPXP
Vice President, Learning and Professional Development
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  caring  employee engagement  impact  interactions  journey  patient experience community  power of choice 

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At the Heart of Patient Experience is Caring for Those Who Care: A Call to Action for Those in Need

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, PhD, CPXP, Thursday, September 7, 2017

For the last two weeks, I have had the opportunity to visit two amazing healthcare institutions in São Paulo, Brazil – Hospital Sírio Libanêse and Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein – and meet healthcare leaders from across Latin America committed to improving patient experience. While there I had the unique experience of watching the approach of and resulting impact of Hurricane Harvey on Texas and Louisiana from outside the United States. As was evident in every report, the challenge this storm posed for the communities it impacted, their infrastructure and their healthcare organizations placed a significant strain on the system and created great need.

As we have seen in patient experience efforts around the globe, a central priority has emerged, one focused on taking care of not just those we serve in healthcare, but the people serving as well. This idea of caring for our team and staff in healthcare, of ensuring the engagement and care of our employees, was in fact the fastest growing point of focus in supporting patient experience success in The State of Patient Experience 2017. It is clear that taking care of those who give of themselves in healthcare is something we cannot and should not take lightly. This is no more relevant than at this moment in cities such as Houston, TX in the aftermath of Harvey (and now for those in the path of Hurricane Irma).

For all that healthcare organizations have done to support the needs of their communities impacted by Harvey, they too have been literally underwater. With many instances of organizations with disrupted and/or discontinued services, these organizations have stretched their capacity to care for the communities they serve. Yet, what we must realize is that those providing care are not only caregivers, they are the affected themselves. They too may be displaced by flooding or damage, their families impacted and their lives disrupted, yet they have remained steadfast in their efforts to care for those in need.

It is in times like this where the need to care for those who provide care is impossible to miss. It also reinforces that we cannot and should not overlook this need any day in which we are looking to provide the best in care for our communities, for the best in care starts with taking care of our own people. And this critical time calls on not just the organizations impacted to step up, but truly all of us with the means and/or desire to help to do the same.

Our colleagues at ACHE last week called for the support of an effort at the Texas Hospital Association, which has established the THA Hospital Employee Assistance Fund to help hospital employees who experienced significant property loss or damage due to Hurricane Harvey. There are also still significant needs for all those impacted by this event that can be supported via the American Red Cross and numerous other charitable opportunities.

These needs and the opportunities to help are now being elevated by the latest storm, Irma. With her eye already impacting many and set at one of the busiest hubs of healthcare activity in the United States, the need to care for one another and our call to take care of others is only further reinforced. This is not a time to sit idly by, but rather recognize that whether in the path of a literal storm or in the dynamic and chaotic environment that healthcare globally presents, we must never overlook the opportunity to care for those who care.

In the industry of caring for others that healthcare represents and the profession of patient experience that is emerging at its core, we must not forget that our primary means of delivering on our purpose, promise and commitments is through the very people who give of themselves every day to care for others. It is in times like this that we all must step up to care for and support them.

I invite you to join us in this effort, to support the affected members of our community and all those in need. For in healthcare, where we are human beings caring for human beings, and with an unwavering commitment to the human experience in healthcare (and beyond), we are called to act and help those in our communities who need us. There may be no greater purpose in our work, and no greater effort in ensuring we maintain the best in experience for all we care for and serve. Thank you for joining us in this effort as our deepest thoughts and warmest wishes go to all impacted by Harvey and those preparing for the arrival of Irma.

The following links will allow you to learn more about and contribute to the following causes and I invite you to share other means of support for these efforts via the comments section below:

THA Hospital Employee Assistance Fund

 American Red Cross

 

Jason A. Wolf, PhD, CPXP 
President 
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  community  compassion  compassionate care  employee engagement  houston  hurricane harvey  hurricane relief 

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Patient Experience: A Global Conversation

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Thursday, May 4, 2017
Updated: Thursday, May 4, 2017

I am writing this blog as we wrap up the 2017 Patient Experience Symposium in Sydney. The event, a collaboration among healthcare and consumer organizations in Australia committed to engaging in and expanding the conversation on patient experience, comes on the heels of an incredible Patent Experience Week where we saw organizations from around the globe celebrating those committed to excellence in patient experience. In that same period, we had the release of the latest issue of Patient Experience Journal (PXJ) that brought together perspectives from around the world and is now read in over 190 countries and territories.

As I reflect on just these last few days, they represent a significant statement about where the patient experience movement is going. They also offer us some perspective on the opportunity we have before us and the efforts we must consider in moving to action overall. The experience movement that bloomed in the last decade and that some called a fad that would soon pass or an idea that would be obscured by shifting policy focus or diluted by competing priorities, instead has found itself expanding with purpose.

As Jane Cummings, CNO England wrote in her commentary in the latest PXJ, “the global dialogue on patient experience will become even more important, as we recognise that despite differences in design and operation, the challenges our health systems face and the focus on what matters most to patients are shared.” This recognition that we are moving to a macro effort, acknowledging the reality of our own individual systemic constraints not as impediments, but perhaps learning points to be leveraged is where opportunity calls us. In looking across systems boundaries and peeling back policy layers, we reveal fundamentals that rest solidly at the heart of the experience conversation. These ideas were reinforced in the latest State of Patient Experience data just released during Patient Experience Conference 2017.

  1. Experience must remain an integrated focus on quality, safety, service and more. To provide the best in experience and effect positive change, we can no longer force boundaries between these efforts in the face that they are all part of what patients, families and consumers encounter.
  2. The fastest growing area of focus for organizations in addressing experience is employee engagement. This rapid rise in both recognition of and focus on staff needs in the healthcare ecosystem is fundamental and significant. The idea that we must take care of ourselves to take care of others, is not just motherly advice, but sound strategic thinking in a business where we are human beings caring for human beings.
  3. In finding employee engagement at the heart of all we do, it is forever intertwined with the engagement of patients and family members as partners in this work, not only in their own care plans, but in the very work we must do to redesign our systems of care, co-design new processes and better understand the needs of those we serve. My visit this last two weeks in Australia and the opportunity to engage with both the consumer councils in New South Wales and Western Australia reinforced the critical point that patients, family and community members are partners in and consumers of care. This idea spans our globe and must be central to any actions we take.

In all that I had the chance to see and learn during my last 10 days in Australia, what was shared over PX Week and is part of the ongoing patient experience conversation, not only are these core ideas central across time zones, there are core practices that follow as well. These include ideas such as the intentional collection of actionable data – both through formal survey methods and now more so in real time to address critical issues and build cases for change, interdisciplinary rounds and bedside shift reports and handoffs, creating formal structures and processes for engaging patients and families on councils, boards and committees and expanding how staff and employees can provide feedback and contribute to improvements.

In finding core ideas and common ground, we must also acknowledge the work of patient experience is not easy work. It is not something we master simply by creating checklists or wrangle with protocols. It is something that requires strategic commitment, an openness to collaboration and sharing and perhaps most of all an acknowledgement that we are all in this effort together. There is a global conversation taking place on patient experience, one focused on creating the best healthcare systems driving the best results on all corners of our globe.

We must now be willing to share wildly and steal willingly in order to learn from one another and improve. That is our greatest and most critical opportunity and one we should not take lightly. We are in a unique and opportune moment in healthcare, for as an industry in serving those in front of us, we can and will bring this world closer. It is a conversation I am honored to be a part of and one I, and I hope each of you, will strive every day to champion.

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., CPXP
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  collaboration  community of practice  employee engagement  global  partnership  patient and family engagement  patient experience week  state of patient experience 

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Reflecting on the Field of Patient Experience

Posted By Deanna Frings, Tuesday, April 5, 2016
Updated: Tuesday, April 5, 2016

I was recently invited to participate in a panel discussion on the topic of talent and the patient experience at an event for healthcare human resource professionals.  The event says so much about how far we have come in our understanding of what it takes to support patient experience excellence and this emerging field.  Preparing for this event gave me the opportunity to step back and reflect on the field of patient experience. 

Prior to joining the team at The Beryl Institute, I was a member of this global community of practice and attended the PX Conference in 2012.  It was here that I first heard about the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge, a framework of 15 broadly accepted domains reflecting the knowledge and skills of a patient experience professional.  

As I sat listening to the details of the framework and how it came to be, I was thrilled not only because over 400 individuals from 10 countries contributed to its development but it was the first time I began thinking about what I did as a growing profession, a field of practice and an emerging field.  I had something concrete to take back to my own organization that so clearly framed this field of patient experience and defined its core ideas.  

You see, my entry into patient experience started like many across the country.  I was asked to be part of a committee within my health system charged with implementing tactics that would improve our patient satisfaction scores.  Over the next several years, that committee membership evolved to a dedicated role as the Director of Patient and Family Relations leading the organization’s efforts on building a culture of experience excellence.  Our journey was very similar to others as evidenced in the findings of The State of the Patient Experience 2015 Study showing a growing acknowledgement from senior executives on the importance of investing resources dedicated to patient experience leaders. 

Fast forwarding to late spring 2014, I had been in my role with The Beryl Institute as the Director of Learning & Professional Development for one year and we had launched the first five PX Body of Knowledge courses.  In 2015, we achieved a major milestone when all 15 courses became available, one for each domain.   It was the first time a comprehensive program was available supporting professional development of healthcare leaders in the field of patient experience. 

We have since awarded a total of over 60 Certificates in Patient Experience Leadership and Patient Advocacy and there are over 250 currently completing the PX Body of Knowledge courses.  Not only do these numbers show the high level of interest patient experience professionals have in developing their knowledge and skills but they show again the acknowledgement by senior executives of the critical role of leadership in achieving patient experience excellence.

As I come to a close with my reflections, I would be remiss if I did not mention the incredible work at our sister organization, Patient Experience Institute.  Following a rigorous and standardized process and involving hundreds of members of the global patient experience community, the first inaugural Certified Patient Experience Professional (CPXP) exam was launched this past December. Achievement of CPXP certification highlights a commitment to the profession and to maintaining current skills and knowledge in supporting and expanding the field of patient experience and demonstrates clear qualifications to senior leaders, colleagues, and the industry. 

It’s always nice to reflect back as a means to identify the progress made. We know patient experience matters, it continues to be a top priority and there is a growing acknowledgement of the critical need and value for dedicated patient experience leaders.  And to that end, we must all take action in shaping the future field of patient experience.

  1. There is a recognized need for individuals with the knowledge and skills to lead patient experience efforts.  Use the PX Body of Knowledge framework to assess your professional development needs and build a plan to advance your knowledge and skills.
  2. Everyone plays an important role in the patient experience.  Share the framework with your Human Resource partners and work with them integrating the patient experience leadership competencies as part of an overall talent management strategy.
  3. Senior Leaders recognize that leadership is a strategic asset.  Be a role model and distinguish yourself as a leader in today’s healthcare marketplace.  Work within your organization's advocating and in supporting all healthcare leaders have the skills and knowledge critical to ensure the best experiences for your patients, their families and your employees positioning your organization to drive the best in outcomes for all you serve.  

As the journey continues, I’m excited about the future.  I encourage each of you to be part of the ongoing conversation sharing your ideas on how to support, educate and influence the many leaders across all functions within your organization.  I know I'm looking forward to the conversation next week with healthcare human resource professionals as they explore their role in ensuring an excellent experience for all.

Deanna Frings
Director, Learning and Professional Development
The Beryl Institute

 

Tags:  community  community of practice  employee engagement  engagement  healthcare  improving patient experience  Leadership  Patient Experience  service excellence 

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How Will You Invest in Patient Experience in 2016?

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Tuesday, December 1, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, December 1, 2015

We recently celebrated our first five years as a community of practice and looked back, somewhat in awe, at the incredible growth of this organization over such a short time. The Beryl Institute is now a global community of almost 40,000 individuals passionate about improving the healthcare experience for patients, families and caregivers.

The momentum continues, as does the realization that organizations are making significant investments in time, energy and dollars to ensure they are prepared to deliver the best possible patient experience. We see these investments in many forms from hiring teams to training leaders and staff to building and supporting cultures of excellence.

As we shared in the 2015 State of Patient Experience Benchmarking study, senior patient experience leadership and staff investment is growing with 42% of respondents having a Chief Experience Officer (or comparable position) compared to only 22% two years ago.  Along with that, the size of patient experience teams is growing; 33% of organizations reported having five or more staff members supporting patient experience efforts. 

The Beryl Institute community reflects this trend as well. This year over 200 organizations will invest in institutional membership – meaning they provide unlimited access to the Institute’s white papers, webinars, topic calls, learning bites, etc. to everyone within their facility. They are making a statement that people in ALL roles impact the patient experience and should have access to research and collaboration that will assist their efforts.

We have also seen tremendous interest in learning and professional development programs intended to train patient experience leaders and other staff. We recently increased our virtual classroom offerings in the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge courses to support growing participation in the community-developed program that provides Certificates in Patient Experience Leadership and Patient Advocacy.

Patient Experience Conference had its largest attendance to date this year and we were honored to partner with member organizations to host sold out Regional Roundtable events in San Francisco, Charlotte and Minneapolis. Our community is eager to gain (and share) knowledge and to invest in their personal career growth. In fact, today our sister organization, Patient Experience Institute, will offer the first testing opportunity for those hoping to earn their CPXP, the professional certification for Patient Experience Leaders.

While we’re excited to celebrate the five-year milestone, we acknowledge how much work is still to be done. We imagine (and hope to help inspire) a world where all healthcare organizations appreciate the power and impact of patient experience efforts and make without hesitation the investments necessary to be the best they can be for patients and families.

Earlier this year we released Our Stand, a list of guiding principles we’ve identified in our five years of leading this work that can have significant impact on patient experience success. I share them again as a reminder as you evaluate your own efforts and consider what investment opportunities make sense to support your specific needs.

We believe organizations and systems committed to providing the best in experience WILL:

  • Identify and support accountable leadership with committed time and focused intent to shape and guide experience strategy
  • Establish and reinforce a strong, vibrant and positive organizational culture and all it comprises
  • Develop a formal definition for what experience is to their organization
  • Implement a defined process for continuous patient and family input and engagement
  • Engage all voices in driving comprehensive, systemic and lasting solutions
  • Look beyond clinical experience of care to all interactions and touch points
  • Focus on alignment across all segments of the continuum and the spaces in between
  • Encompass both a focus on healing and a commitment to well-being

As you prepare for the coming year I challenge you to reflect on your organization’s commitment to experience improvement. Where are you exceling and where are your opportunities to do even more for your patients, families, caregivers and staff? Our patient experience community is here to support your journey and I encourage you to take full advantage of the incredible resources and knowledge available. 

Wishing you a wonderful holiday season and a successful New Year!

 

Stacy Palmer
Vice President, Strategy and Member Experience
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  body of knowledge  certification  collaboration  community of practice  Continuum of Care  culture  employee engagement  Field of Patient Experience  global healthcare  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  Interactions  Leadership  Nurse Leadership  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  Regional Roundtable  service excellence 

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Why We are ALL the Patient Experience!

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D., Tuesday, June 3, 2014
Updated: Tuesday, June 3, 2014


"We are ALL the patient experience” is not just the theme that underlined Patient Experience Conference 2014; I would offer it is an idea that must be central to patient experience improvement and the patient experience movement overall. I am encouraged by the increasing acknowledgement that it takes all players in the healthcare marketplace, across the continuum, through the established hierarchies, and from patient & family, to caregiver, to community to ensure the best in experience.


This was exemplified during my On the Road visit just last week to Cape Regional Medical Center that will be published later this month. What I found was an institution that understood and acted fully on what community meant and, in doing so, engaged staff, physicians, leadership, patients and families in collective efforts to provide the best in experience.

I am often asked for the quick list of solutions to drive patient experience excellence or the checklist of actions that will lead straight to success. What my visit to Cape Regional reinforced, and what I have learned from so many other institutions, is that there is no one path to patient experience nirvana. Actually, I think we could all identify many core tactics that would help support improvement efforts. There are truly no secrets in this work (or at least there should not be). In fact I would challenge any organization that claims to have the secret recipe, be they provider or consultant, to examine what is truly distinct or unique about their efforts, and highlight, market and sell around that premise – not as an ultimate solution, but as a piece of an intricate puzzle. I believe there are practical ideas and innovative solutions we can learn from one another and, in fact, that is what I hope to reinforce.

A strong patient experience effort must be built on a patchwork of ideas, with a foundation of commitment across roles and responsibilities. While patient experience may be (and we encourage it should be) led by an individual or partnership of leaders, it can never be fully executed in isolation. In fact if we believe that at its core, experience is about the interactions that take place between two human beings around issues related to quality, safety, service and even improvement, then we must acknowledge the simple, yet powerful point that we are all the patient experience.

The implications for this understanding are significant and the imperative for supporting action is clear. Successful organizations driving patient experience improvement, and sustaining it, have worked hard to:

  • Develop and support leaders at all levels, in all roles, across all functions
  • Equip people with direct and easy access to the broadest amount of relevant and actionable information possible
  • Build solid partnerships with those they serve through active patient and community engagement
  • Build recognition and performance plans in direct alignment with experience objectives
  • Create a sense of shared ownership and reinforce accountability for ideas developed and actions taken

And the list could go on as you build an integrated effort.

You see, improving patient experience and the effort it requires must be owned by all and every individual most often impacts experience at the moment of a simple encounter. This means we must prepare these individuals to act. It is for this very reason that we introduced a simple, but comprehensive Institutional membership access to The Beryl Institute this year. This membership offers healthcare facilities of all sizes and purposes the broadest access for the most individuals in their organization. It provides information, education and accountability across the organization’s community. We have seen organizations with front line nurses to senior leaders and patient and family advisory council members to physicians engaged in accessing community resources and, in doing so, contributing strong ideas as well.

It is in our ability to engage the broadest range of voices through which we can find the best in experience outcomes. I encourage you to provide the opportunity for leadership to emerge, for new ideas to be fostered and for proven concepts to be shared. I know at the Institute we are committed to ensure you have the platform on which to build those efforts every day. Here is to all each individual contributes to the best in experience and for the rallying cry that moves us forward: We are ALL the Patient Experience!

Jason. A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute
  

Tags:  accountability  efforts  employee engagement  improving patient experience  Leadership  Patient Experience 

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Reflections on Patient Experience Week

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Tuesday, May 6, 2014
Updated: Tuesday, May 6, 2014

Last week we celebrated the first annual Patient Experience Week, providing a focused time for organizations to recognize accomplishments, reenergize efforts and honor the people who impact patient experience everyday. From nurses and physicians, to support staff and executive professionals, to patients, families and communities served, the Institute brought together healthcare organizations across the globe.

Proclaiming a new week to observe is a little scary, especially in healthcare where we were warned that many organizations suffer from ‘Week Fatigue,’ but we were delighted by the excitement, participation and support from the community.

We believe that by being a part of Patient Experience Week, healthcare organizations showed employees they appreciate their hard work and encourage their continued efforts on behalf of patients. This week was meant to enhance patient and staff relations, increase hospital morale and improve overall communication, and that’s exactly what we watched it do.

From the social media buzz to our constant phone calls and emails from excited participants, we had the privilege of watching PX Week move from a mere idea to a true success exemplifying the strength of the global patient experience movement. And for a small, mission-driven organization like the Institute, the power in those five days was substantial. We were excited by every idea, photo, video and email that came in. As we work daily to be a community of practice for professionals passionate about improving patient experience, we believe last week exemplified our heart, soul and mission.

Dozens of #IMPX photos were sent in from individuals and teams, representing medical practices, hospitals and vendors (click on the image above to zoom in and see some of the faces in the #IMPX mural). Several healthcare facilities added their videos to the #IMPX video library, organizations issued press releases to educate their communities about their patient experience efforts, and flyers, thank you cards, screen savers and even placemats reinforced the importance of the patient experience movement to those delivering care each day.

Hundreds of organizations participated in PX Week webinars where industry leaders discussed the current and future states of patient experience.  In addition to sharing ideas from the community and offering expert perspectives, we were excited to make several new announcements throughout the week: 

  • PX Body of Knowledge – After two years of development, the first five courses in the PX Body of Knowledge were released, representing the community-developed foundation for effective patient experience leaders. Over 400 individuals from 10 countries contributed to this work.
  • PX Journal - The inaugural issue of Patient Experience Journal (PXJ) was published, an international, multidisciplinary, open-access, peer-reviewed journal focused on understanding and improving patient experience.
  • PX Learning Bites – We released the first in a series of patient experience learning bites - videos featuring industry leader’s insight about patient experience improvement in 2-3 minute segments.

All of these things represent the power of the patient experience movement – the advancement possible by the sharing of ideas, knowledge and practices and the community of professionals willing to contribute.

With this reflection on PX Week, we recognize and want to reinforce that the work to impact and improve patient experience is not something we just do in one moment, one week or one initiative.  The members of the Institute community and those in healthcare around the world committed to this effort are working tirelessly each and every day to ensure the best in patient experience. We acknowledge, encourage and remain steadfast in our support of these efforts.

As we anticipate the next Patient Experience Week, April 27 –May 1, 2015. We encourage you to mark your calendars and start planning your festivities now, but more importantly, we hope you will join us on the continued journey to create the best possible experiences for patients, their families and caregivers. 

Stacy Palmer
VP, Strategy and Member Experience
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  community of practice  employee engagement  global healthcare  healthcare  improving patient experience  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  PXweek  service excellence 

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Nurse Leadership Matters in Patient Experience Performance

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D., Tuesday, March 4, 2014

As shared by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and known by many in practice, nurses represent the single largest group of health professionals who deliver hospital care. This represents a broad range of caregivers from the senior ranks of CEOs or CNOs, to the bedside, from managing triage in emergency departments to conducting post discharge follow-up calls.

With this expansive reach, nurses and in particular nurse leaders, have a significant opportunity to impact the experiences of patients and families. I say this reinforcing the strong point found in the definition of patient experience that experience is created in every interaction – meaning by everyone that plays a role in the healthcare system and at all points in the continuum of care, from well before to well after a clinical encounter. With that we would be short sighted to miss the fact that the experience most patients and family members relate to, reflect on and remember is the one they had with their nurses.

In a Hospital Impact blog last year, I wrote about my own experience of quickly leaving at the close of Patient Experience Conference to become a family member at the bedside for the birth of our son. I spoke of Kristen, our L&D nurse, who was responsive and took every opportunity to not only set appropriate expectations, but also answer our questions. She served as a guide through one of life’s most important and incredible moments.

In inquiring why she and other nurses in the unit were so positive and engaged (and not revealing my profession), I was told about how their leaders take time to support the nurse team not simply as individuals there to work, but as professionals, people and partners in care delivery.

In thinking back on this moment I had the chance to share some thoughts with the nurse leaders at my most recent On the Roadsite – Presbyterian Health Services. My realization in the conversations reminded me of how as a family member I had clear expectations about clinical excellence, quality and responsiveness from my nurse team. It was the things they did beyond that though that drove my experience.

As we talked at Presbyterian, it became clear in the dialogue that in the fast-paced world of healthcare, specifically in the nursing realm, nurse leaders have a critical role to play. They set the stage for behavior, they reinforce actions and responses, and they coach, guide, cajole and celebrate with their teams. In the end these nurse leaders, whether aware of it or not, are indirectly driving the experience for so many in their care.

This observation and discussion was supported by the data revealed in the 2013 State of Patient Experience Benchmarking Study. In both the 2011 and 2013 research "clinical managers who visibly support patient experience efforts” was the second greatest driver of experience success after visible support from the top. Here again leadership was reinforced as critical, and more so the clinical managers, those guiding the largest part of the healthcare workforce and with the greatest contact with those served, were identified as central to patient experience performance.

What does all this mean in action. Based on what I have experienced and learned from the many nurse leaders I have had the fortune to work with, the ideas are simple in concept, but sometimes require great effort to execute. Nurse leaders must:

  • Nurture and develop their teams beyond core clinical skills to the behaviors they see as critical to the total delivery of care.
  • Model expectations at all times in their own actions and hold themselves and everyone else accountable when these expectations are broken.
  • Listen and create a space for the words of all team members to be heard. Sometimes the greatest of ideas come from the unlikeliest of sources.
  • Reinforce and create a sense of ownership in staff at all levels that they are leaders in every moment. As every experience happens in the interaction between one human being and another, every individual has the power to choose how they lead in every moment.

In a world where nurse leadership faces continued and growing pressures to perform, these, what some might call, "softer”, non-clinical aspects of leadership and action can easily be pushed aside. But it continues to be the strongest and most successful leaders I see that find the space and time to consider and act on these aspects of the total experience.

It is simple. In whatever way fits their style or the organization in which they provide care, nurse leaders matter in patient experience performance. Of that there is truly no question.

Jason. A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute


In recognition of the importance of nurse leadership in impacting patient experience, The Beryl Institute is excited to join one of our supporting partners, TruthPoint, to offer patient experience resources at the upcoming American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE) Annual Meeting in Orlando, Florida.

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Healthcare Leadership and Management .

Tags:  celebration  Continuum of Care  culture  employee engagement  healthcare  improving patient experience  Leadership  Nurse  Nurse Leadership  Patient Experience  service excellence 

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How Will You Inspire the Patient Experience Movement? Four Considerations for 2014

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Tuesday, January 14, 2014

I am inspired. The New Year has arrived with great energy at The Beryl Institute. We start 2014 as a global community of practice of over 20,000 professionals, focused without hesitation on ensuring the best in experience for patients, families and one another in healthcare.

I am inspired by the continued commitments expressed for this work: by The Beryl Institute’s Patient Experience Scholars who met recently to share their research and reinforce their willingness to encourage and support others; by the members of the Global Patient & Family Advisory Council who want to influence how patients and family members are heard and engaged in making a profound difference in healthcare; by the many contributing to the development of the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge courses soon to be available to the community; and by many more.

I am inspired by how in the first two weeks of a new year, such commitment and intent can emerge, built on all that has come before and focused with purpose on the great opportunities ahead. As I reflect on this idea, a question emerged and perhaps a challenge for each of us to consider:

How will you inspire the patient experience movement in the year ahead?

I pose this question with the hope that actions and considerations from the smallest moments of unparalleled kindness to the largest strategic triumphs all find room to take root and grow. Inspiration comes in all shapes and sizes, but in this diversity it has strong commonalities – it causes us to feel a sense of something special and powerful. It provides a boundless energy to influence, lead, change and make a difference. This is an exciting prospect in seeing that each of us can choose to have an impact. And while no two actions will be exactly alike, I do want to offer a few thoughts on how you can continue to frame your patient experience efforts to inspire yourself and others.

As we return to the definition of patient experience, I continue to experience its relevance time-and-time again in the application of these words to central actions associated with excellence. In reviewing its words – the sum of all interactions, shaped by an organization’s culture, that influence patient perceptions, across the continuum of care – I again see clear directions on moving your own experience efforts forward. They include:

1. Reinforce strategic focus. Patient experience has proven itself to be a relevant part of the healthcare conversation. It has surpassed the challenges of being dubbed a fad; it too has shown it has stronger legs than just serving as a policy framework. Experience is a central strategic pillar to organizational performance and success. Patient Experience in its broadest sense should be a clear and transparent component of every healthcare organization’s strategy.

2. Clarify and map your critical interactions. Experience doesn’t happen on billboards or in espoused actions, it happens at the most personal moments, at those points of engagement between one individual and another. The ultimate tool in patient experience improvement is your self, your heart, your hands and arms, your minds, your compassion and your common sense. We have a huge opportunity to map the interactions that occur on the patient path to ensure we consider the most effective way to respond at every touch point.

3. Model desired behaviors. Simply put, if interactions drive experience, then the behaviors that comprise them are the conduits that direct these interactions in one way or another. Organizational culture is shaped by behaviors, they represent the people, presence and purpose of an organization overall and no slogan, policy or program will trump the power of individual behavior. We must model, observe, coach and improve constantly to impact experience outcomes.

4. Expand your listening. As we ended 2013 exploring the Voices of Measurement, we learned that the power of data is only as valid as what we choose to do with it. Collection or reporting data for the sake of data misses the opportunity for learning and relevant action. To capitalize on the value of the voices that surround us in healthcare we must expand our listening. Experience is measured first in the direct voices of healthcare consumers, who remain our most significant mirror into our own efforts, but it is also found in the voices of our peers and colleagues. We are only capable of achieving our strategy through our people. They are much more than pawns to direct, but rather living resources accountable for ensuring excellence.

Perhaps these ideas will help spark your own thoughts on how you will choose to inspire the patient experience movement. Regardless of which direction you go, I hope you recognize the power that exists in your own personal choice and the ability to impact the experience of the person that is coming next. The year ahead can and should be about a great many things both personally and professionally. My hope is that you find you can and will be an inspiration in your efforts. This cause is too great for your efforts to be anything less. Now the question remains, what will you do? I look forward to your updates with great anticipation.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  accountability  Advocacy  body of knowledge  choice  community of practice  consumer advocacy  Continuum of Care  culture  defining patient experience  employee engagement  Field of Patient Experience  global defining patient experience  global healthcare  HCAHPS  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  Interactions  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  service excellence  thought leadership  voice 

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Involvement is the Path to Patient Experience Excellence

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, August 6, 2013
Updated: Tuesday, August 6, 2013

The words of the day in healthcare of late, especially in light of the policy undertones influencing the system in the U.S., are around engagement and activation, especially of patients, but also focused on staff, physicians and community. Studies show that activated patients are more apt to have greater patient experiences (When Seeing the Same Physician, Highly Activated Patients Have Better Care Experiences Than Less Activated Patients, Health Affairs, July 2013 32(7):1295–1305) and the e-patient revolution is well underway as exemplified by such organizations as the Society for Participatory Medicine.Papers espouse the power of staff engagement as the means to better experience (The Role of Organization Culture in a Positive Patient Experience, The Beryl Institute, 2012) and community engagement is reflected by growing involvement in strategic efforts such as what I experienced at the William Osler Health System in Brampton, Ontario, Canada.

While these ideas are external efforts that influence specific organizational strategies and associated actions, I was struck with the recognition this too is what we have worked to model via The Beryl Institute ourselves. As a global community of practice, we have been clear in declaring a mission to create a dynamic space for members to convene, engage and contribute to elevating, expanding and enriching the global dialogue on improving the patient experience.

In just the last two weeks we held the very first call for our Global Patient and Family Advisory Council (GPFAC), an incredible group of patients and family members committed to serving in ensuring patient and family voice is part of the patient experience movement. Their generosity of spirit and commitment to this cause left me inspired and excited for all we still have to do in our efforts to improve experience. We also met with our Patient Experience Advisory Board for their quarterly call to review our direction and strategy as an Institute and ensure we are meeting the needs of those on the front lines addressing the patient experience every day. In that conversation I was moved by the excitement and commitment to the movement we all support. It is through the generosity and spirit of these two groups, and also the continued contributions of members and guests via On the Road visits, sharing case studies, and through a record number of Patient Experience Conference speaking submissions, as just a few examples, that the sense of involvement was palpable.

Involvement, you could argue is a play on all these words: engaged, activated or even participatory. I do not want to play the semantics game, but for sake of discussion, one can be engaged or even "activated” without a true bias for action, they can simply serve as states of "being”, not doing. Perhaps this is why the Gallup Organization uses the term "actively engaged” to reinforce their measures of a highly engaged workforce. Participation, more so, suggests action, as it requires the individual to be doing something. Involvement continues to expand that reason, from one of a state of being to one of acting. In fact one definition of involvement I saw encompassed these very terms (parenthetical comments are my own): to engage (an action) as a participant (an active contributor).

The takeaway for me here is simple, as we have seen in countless organizational visits, cases and presentations, as we have uncovered in research efforts and benchmarking studies and perhaps most importantly what we have experienced in our very organization is that not only does involvement matter, it has significant influence on what can be achieved, how it is achieved and how quickly it can be achieved. An unassuming word on its own, involvement, may provide a profoundly important key to success in a healthcare world now intently focused on the improvement of the experience of all, patients, family members, community and caregivers. I believe that involvement is a fundamental component of any path to patient experience success. The question that now remains is how involved are you in your efforts and how willing are you to involve others in your success? I also strongly invite you to get involved in the patient experience movement and The Beryl Institute. We all still have significant and exciting work ahead!

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Coaching and Developing Others.

Tags:  community of practice  culture  employee engagement  healthcare  improving patient experience  patient  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  service excellence  thought leadership 

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