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“#Hellomyname is”: An idea at the heart of the experience movement

Posted By Jason Wolf, Monday, August 1, 2016
Updated: Friday, July 29, 2016

Just over a week ago the world lost a powerful advocate for our humanity. While Dr. Kate Granger, a physician turned patient advocate due to her own healthcare experiences may have left us physically, she will be forever present through a powerful legacy that rests at the heart of the patient experience movement. 

I never had the honor to personally know Kate, but in what she accomplished with the golden minutes of life she maintained, I felt I have met her fully. If we believe our efforts in healthcare are grounded in the simple notion that we are human beings caring for human beings our lenses shift. We move from a notion of clinical protocol or programed action, to personal consideration, understanding and partnership.

At the heart of this idea is that in healthcare all of the moments we have – clinically or otherwise – take place at a point of interaction. It is at this point of interaction where experience happens. We are not nameless providers of care interacting with a diagnosis or room number, rather all that exists is a connection, one person to another.

As people, whether on the delivery or the receiving side of healthcare across settings, each and every one of us is an individual with a story, a heart, a soul, memories, dreams, hopes, fears and a name. Perhaps it is the latter, that I am person with a name, that serves as the frame for all of this. That is the legacy that Kate is leaving us.

Kate inspired an idea that exemplifies the fundamental simplicity behind ensuring the best in experience. For in our simple actions, we can have the most profound impact. Kate’s realization through her experiences on the other side of the bed were that we all too often missed one another as people, we didn't share who we were, we didn't share our name. As Kate revealed in an interview on her own experience, she was not treated as a person, but rather an object to be treated, stating, “I just couldn’t believe the impersonal nature of care and how people seemed to be hiding behind their anonymity.”

This led to a powerful idea and an emerging movement - #hellomynameis. This concept now used by hundreds of thousands of people globally was grounded in a simple concept. As Kate shared via her site, the purpose of #hellomynameis is “to encourage and remind healthcare staff about the importance of introductions in healthcare. I firmly believe it is not just about common courtesy, but it runs much deeper. Introductions are about making a human connection between one human being who is suffering and vulnerable, and another human being who wishes to help. They begin therapeutic relationships and can instantly build trust in difficult circumstances. In my mind #hellomynameis is the first rung on the ladder to providing truly person-centred, compassionate care.

These words define the profound power of this idea and the importance of this legacy. If we are to remain true to the foundation on which healthcare has been built – on care, on connection, on healing the whole person and on the compassion it takes – this is an idea we cannot ignore. It is who we are in healthcare and reminds us of and supports us in being all we aspire to be. This idea personifies all I have seen as good, right and true as I have traveled around the healthcare world in search of experience excellence. So while Kate may no longer walk with us, we can carry her heart and spirit in every interaction we look to have and for the very hope that each of us has for the greatest healthcare can be. We must carry on this legacy and I encourage each and every one of you to engage in this cause. #Hellomynameis Jason and I, like you, am the patient experience. Join me!

To learn more about Kate and her effort, here are a few valuable links:

Hellomynameis.org
Hello, my name is Kate Granger
BMJ – Kate Granger
Globe and Mail – Andre Picard - Remembering Kate Granger, a champion of human connection

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute 

 

Tags:  #Hellomynameis  defining patient experience  global healthcare  improving patient experience  Kate Granger  patient engagement  Patient Experience  patient stories  storytelling  voice 

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Patients and Families Included

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Tuesday, August 4, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, August 4, 2015

Just a short, but incredibly exciting 5 years ago, I was writing my fourth patient experience blog in what has become a monthly occurrence. In that blog I introduced the definition of patient experience created by early contributors to The Beryl Institute community. In those first months of our work we were focused on reinforcing some fundamental ideas and values that have remained at the core of our work at the Institute since that summer we got underway.

In introducing the definition we offered,

"A positive patient experience is created by partnering with patients and their support network (i.e., families or caregivers) to anticipate needs and exceed expectations, recognize the individuality of each patient as a decision maker, form a caring, compassionate and lasting relationship.”

From those very roots we have operated, not from the perspective of providers only, or espoused a singular model or organizational perspective. Rather, we have comfortably left that to those with personal or business interests in what they saw and see as the potential of the patient experience marketplace. Our belief was and remains that the ability to improve the patient experience at a global level is grounded in collaboration and partnership, a welcoming of all perspectives and encouraging open sharing of ideas across segments of healthcare, organizational boundaries and even national borders. This philosophy has led to the largest community of practice dedicated to patient experience improvement, now almost 35,000 people strong representing almost 50 countries around the globe.

The significance here is that from the very beginning of our work we have operated from the mindset that patients and families are partners in the overall experience conversation, or simply stated, patients must be included. I offered this perspective as recently as my Hospital Impact Blog last week, but perhaps more importantly have lived it through our work as we have continued to learn and grow as a community. These efforts have been realized through the inclusion of patient and family voice on our boards from the outset, in our establishment of our Global Patient and Family Advisory Council (GPFAC) and the cutting edge work they continue to push us to explore (including some exciting news to be announced later this month), and they have been seen in our provision of learning and content from webinars and papers, to Patient Experience Conference itself, which has included patient and family voice on stage, in breakouts and in participation for the past few years.

It is for these reasons and grounded in our founding values that we are excited to also reinforce our commitment to the formal efforts around having patients included in healthcare gatherings. The phrase "nothing about me without me” is not new to healthcare, but what is emerging is a more critical intent on ensuring the consumer voice is engaged and included in the broader healthcare conversation – not simply around individual episodes of care, but in the very discussion of policy, procedures and processes that impact all engaging in healthcare globally.

For this reason, "patients included”, is much more than a nice phrase, it is our commitment and should be the commitment of so many other organizations espousing to include or more significantly represent the patient and family voice in healthcare. As a community comprised of all voices, we believed it was important to reinforce this important point.

The "patients included” movement was inspired by an experience and subsequent blog authored by a virtual colleague and thoughtful healthcare leader Lucien Engelen. He offers in recounting the roots of this effort, "When it was my turn to deliver my keynote, I asked the audience ‘How many patients are present here?’ Not one, it appeared. That there should be so much talk about what patients need and want without them being present prompted me to take action.”

The action resulted in the "Patients Included” movement and most recently a full charter guiding a true patients included effort around healthcare events. The charter, created by the voices of patients, caregivers and healthcare leaders in Spring 2015, calls on healthcare events to commit to the following:

  1. Patients or caregivers with experience relevant to the conference’s central theme actively participate in the design and planning of the event, including the selection of themes, topics and speakers.
  2. Patients or caregivers with experience of the issues addressed by the event participate in its delivery, and appear in its physical audience.
    • The Beryl Institute Patient Experience Conference 2016 keynote speakers includes patient and family voice and perspective. In addition, when sessions are selected late August, they will also reflect patient and family representation.
  3. Travel and accommodation expenses for patients or carers participating in the advertised programme are paid in full, in advance. Scholarships are provided by the conference organisers to allow patients or carers affected by the relevant issues to attend as delegates.
    • The Beryl Institute Patient Experience Conference 2016 offers patient and family scholarships to conference participants to support engaging more patients and family members in the overall patient experience conversation. In addition, patient and family voice throughout our conference keynote speakers are fully covered for fees, travel and accommodation.
  4. The disability requirements of participants are accommodated. All applicable sessions, breakouts, ancillary meetings, and other programme elements are open to patient delegates.
    • The Beryl Institute Patient Experience Conference 2016 will accommodate all disability requirements of conference participants for all parts of the program elements.
  5. Access for virtual participants is facilitated, with free streaming video provided online wherever possible.
    • The Beryl Institute Patient Experience Conference 2016 will provide conference access and updates to virtual participants through social media and the #PX2016 hashtag. Conference participants actively engage online via social media and conference presentations are made available to participants after the event.

While not every organization may be able to accommodate these commitments due to constraints or other considerations, they reinforce a powerful statement on what including all voices and providing the access to do so truly means. At The Beryl Institute, we ourselves have met these very commitments for our own Patient Experience Conference. Patients and families contribute to program development and review and are critical voices on stage and in breakouts. Scholarships, though modest are provided and accessibility, one of our core operating values, is reinforced, including virtual access to the extent possible via social media and other means.

We do this for more than it being the right thing to do. As a community of practice committed to experience improvement, we also believe that which we espouse and encourage in organizations behavior, we must be willing to do and model ourselves.

Patients included is more than a nice slogan or a feel good effort, it is a fundamental premise to executing on the best in patient experience efforts in healthcare today. We welcome the opportunity as we continue to grow to ensure we maintain this perspective and challenge and encourage the patient experience community and the broader healthcare community to take note. Patient and family voice matters in our ability to provide the best in outcomes, it has and always will.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  caregivers  community of practice  defining patient experience  patient and family  patient and family advisory council  patient experience 

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Reframing Patient & Family Experience

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Thursday, June 4, 2015

As the experience conversation grows and more voices enter the discussion, I have come to recognize a need to reframe how we think about experience overall. In much of what I have written and shared in my talks, I have stressed an important point, that experience at its broadest point is all a patient, long-term care resident and/or family member encounters while they are engaged in our healthcare system. Critical to this idea is that, as outlined in our stand at The Beryl Institute, experience also reaches across all segments of the continuum and the spaces in between.

I raise this again now for as recently as this week I have been asked about how experience fits with quality and safety efforts or compares to patient engagement. My concern and therefore my desire to align our conversation is that many in the experience discussion have become trapped by our own warnings – that we continue to address experience from the perspective of providers rather than what the actual experience is for those in our systems.

I start by reinforcing what patient experience is not, in order to build a framework and encourage a discussion of what experience truly must be. For a long while experience was simply aligned with service or service excellence or even more simply satisfaction. For many it still is. Service in healthcare is critical, as it is the domain through which we find ourselves engaging people with dignity and respect, as one human being to another. Yet service is also not the full extent of what the users in our healthcare systems experience. It is but one piece of a complex pie inclusive of quality, safety, service, cost, outcomes and influenced by caregiver engagement, in which we must work diligently to drive integrated actions. 

This leads to the question is experience engagement? There has been incredible work around the processes and tools to drive patient and family engagement and in their very creation believe our answer is provided. If engaging patients and families in care encounters is of value, which it has proven to be, this too becomes a critical practice in positively impacting experience. Engagement tools, and in similar light the concepts of patient and family, or person centered care, all provide an incredibly important set of resources for ensuring the critical positioning and involvement of patients and families as partners in their care. These ideas too then are not experience in total, but rather are central to ensuring a positive experience overall.

I continue to raise this issue for one central reason. That in all we do to ensure the best in healthcare as I note, from quality, safety and service, to driving outcomes or addressing cost, to implementing processes of engagement or person-centeredness, these ideas are OUR language inside healthcare looking out. Yet when looking from the outside in, they are all but parts of one experience.

With this mindful integration I do not suggest we eliminate all distinct efforts to drive results in these various segments of experience. In fact in order to manage the dynamic nature of healthcare today, we need to focus our work on each of these critical efforts to ensure directional progress and continuous improvement. Rather, I do suggest we MUST NOT tackle each of these efforts in isolation, or under the false pretense that they are not part of the broader experience for patients and families.

So what is the opportunity we then have in reframing patient and family experience? I believe we must:

  1. Look beyond experience as just satisfaction or service to the reality of what our patients and families see every day. We do them great disservice by simplifying this idea in a way it becomes tangential or even "soft” to the hard work we do in healthcare every day.
  2. Align and coordinate our divided efforts, and in doing so, our collective language, to reinforce a commitment to the perspective of the end user in healthcare today. We can still segment our work efforts and improvement opportunities to tackle these often complex opportunities and problems, but we cannot and must not do so to the detriment of providing a coordinated and comprehensive experience.
  3. Work together to address experience from the broadest perspective across and at all touch points and the moments of truth we create clinically, interpersonally, virtually, etc. and include the voices of those we care for and serve to ensure an integrated and experience focused effort overall.

Yes we must focus on the basics – the blocking and tacking of what impacts experience everyday on the front lines of care, at points of transition and in the many seams we have created in between, but if we lose perspective on the broader opportunity, our smaller steps may not help us realize our greater goal. If we are committed to providing the best in experience for all in our healthcare systems – quality, safe, service-oriented, cost efficient, outcomes driven, inclusive, coordinated and compassionate – like I know most in healthcare are, then we still have great opportunities ahead. I challenge us to think about reframing our view of experience. In doing so I believe we will identify and achieve all we know is truly possible for all those touched by healthcare every day.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  conversation  defining patient experience  outcomes  patient and family  Patient Experience 

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Reflecting on the Future of Patient Experience: Four Considerations for the Year Ahead

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, December 9, 2014
Updated: Wednesday, December 10, 2014

The end of the year always brings a flurry of activity to finish what we set out to do and/or plan for what awaits in the year to come. It also serves as a time for reflection and looking ahead. This can be both an exciting and overwhelming exercise, but one that simmers at the core of our humanity, one filled with hopes and aspirations, commitments and goals. This is no different when we look to the very humanity at the heart of excellence in patient experience itself.

I remain inspired by the exponential growth in energy, commitment, resources and interest in positively impacting the experience for patients, residents and families and for those providing care at all touch points across the continuum. Our commitment at the Institute remains to ensure this conversation continues to grow. I reinforce often that experience is not a fad, but rather it is fundamental to all we do in healthcare. It is both what we expect as participants in our respective healthcare systems and what we aspire to deliver in every encounter.

To support this in the last year we have expanded our resources and increased accessibility to The Beryl Institute. We have added both complimentary offerings, such as the new open-access and peer reviewed Patient Experience Journal (with forty new articles and commentaries this year) and community member benefits with PX Learning Bites, providing short educational insights into experience excellence. We have developed the core of the PX Body of Knowledge, our community developed framework of learning and development, and will offer twelve new modules before year’s end.

We have also expanded access to our community of practice in launching new Institutional Memberships, engaging thousands of individuals at all levels in healthcare organizations with a passion for patient experience improvement. We also have broadened the experience dialogue across the continuum with new content and engagement for Patient Advocates and in one of the fastest-growing segments in healthcare – Long-Term Care. And while these items were initiated in this year, they also represent a looking ahead and an investment in where we can go together as an experience movement.

This commitment, grounded in the contributions of our almost 28,000 members and guests in over 55 countries, is driven by four considerations I believe are central to driving patient experience excellence across care settings (and have been critical to our work in growing The Beryl Institute community itself). Consider these ideas as you look to the year ahead and your own experience efforts.

  • A mindset of abundance. Experience excellence is grounded in a spirit of generosity, in openness and access, sharing, and the active invitation to engage and contribute. It is the expanding of possibility and an understanding that rather than a zero-sum game, there is much to learn from and enough to spare for all; for those we care for and serve and for those with whom we work.
  • A commitment to inclusivity. The greatest opportunity we have in driving the best in experience is to ensure all voices are not only acknowledged, but also engaged and heard. In expanding our listening and the opportunity for contribution we open up possibilities we have yet to consider or even knew existed.
  • A focus on agility. In the dynamic world of healthcare and in our human environment in general, static state is now equivalent to falling behind and change in many ways is simply treading water. We must build the muscles of agility – the capacity to rapidly reconfigure and realign resources to lead new directions or shift as needed with the needs of our communities and the industry.
  • A drive for innovation. Excellence in experience may be best served by a vigilance to continuously searching for news ways of thinking, doing and disseminating ideas. This is beyond improvement of existing systems to look for concepts, constructs and practices that can lead us to new levels and to positive and lasting outcomes. 

I offer these considerations as we look to the year ahead to suggest something significant. Yes, we have defined experience; yes, we are aware of the critical strategies and tactics that can frame and drive positive outcomes; but, if we are truly committed to a lasting and positive future in this work, we need to think not only about what we do, but also how we continue to stretch ourselves in doing it. The year ahead for patient experience will bring exciting new discoveries, powerful lessons and compelling stories that will move and inspire us to new levels. We do this not only out of passion, but out of our commitment to one another and the care we hope to provide to all.

I wish you all the best of holiday seasons, may it be warm and joyous as you connect with loved ones and friends. And as we look forward, here is to each of you for the positive impact you have committed to in caring for others and each other, as we continue this critical and exciting journey. I am honored and grateful to travel this road with you and anticipate with great excitement all that the days ahead will bring.

Jason. A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  abundance  agility  culture  defining patient experience  improving patient experience  inclusivity  innovationemployee engagement  patient engagement  Patient Experience  service excellence 

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Expanding the dialogue on experience excellence to long term care

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, September 2, 2014
Updated: Monday, September 1, 2014

When we first developed the definition for patient experience with a group of contributing healthcare leaders, four themes emerged as central to our discussion and ultimately to the definition itself – the sum of all interactions, shaped by an organization’s culture, that influence patient perceptions across the continuum of care. These themes shaped the fundamentals for action in providing the best in experience and I still see them as central and imperative across healthcare settings today.

Experience efforts are shaped through the interactions of all individuals involved and grounded in the organization’s culture through which they are delivered. It is the actions of all participants in the care experience – caregivers, support teams, patients and family members alike – that ultimately influence the perceptions of experience and create the lasting impact (and I suggest ripple effect) that each experience has. Experience is a partnership with patients, residents and families, not a doing to, and these words reinforce this critical point.

It is the last element of the definition that is also perhaps the most easily accepted: across the continuum of care. As the patient experience movement has flourished, there has been growing recognition that experience stretches well beyond the four walls of any clinical encounter or the physical structures of the acute care setting. In fact, the ideas of experience, in variations of language including patient, resident or person-centeredness, have permeated the wide array of care experiences one can have in healthcare today. This idea may be no better reinforced than the focus on the experience of individuals in long-term care.

The effort to provide a strong and positive experience for individuals in long-term care is not a new concept. This idea has been addressed in the dialogues of great institutions such as the former Picker Institute and now via Planetree and through organizations such as the Pioneer Network, Leading Age and the American Health Care Association (AHCA). Partly driven by policy, such as we have seen sweep the US healthcare system in other segments of the continuum with the CAHPS efforts, and framed by what we know to be the right thing to do, long-term care has long been focused on the elements of resident quality, safety and service and the built environment to ensure the best for those in their care.

There is a growing understanding in all environments, that aside from the right thing to do for those in our care, or even a must do, there is also increasing policy focus and requirements that not only measure action, but also tie financial implications to them. Yes, we must acknowledge the financial implications of this effort as well, including the reality that individuals in the healthcare system at all points on the continuum are now consumers – people carefully select doctors, they make decisions on which hospitals to seek care and they look long and hard at the options in selecting a location for a parent or loved one to reside for long-term care needs.

If we accept choice is a factor now in healthcare, then experience matters. In focusing on the continuum of care, it matters to the patients, residents, people in our care, it matters to their families and it matters to all who deliver care as well. It is for this reason we continue to evolve our work at The Beryl institute to expand the experience conversation to all points on the continuum of care and to acknowledge the opportunities at the moments of care transition as well.

We have worked to engage broader voices in the physician practice setting by exploring how experience is being addressed by physician clinics and groups and our events are expanding to include greater dialogue and content on the important practices taking place in the ambulatory and outpatient settings. With equal focus (and the support of energized and committed members of our community), we are embarking in expanding our efforts to address experience in the long-term care setting as well. In the coming months, through Patient Experience Conference 2015 and beyond, we will work to collaborate with leading thinkers and organizations to reinforce and expand the critical conversation of experience in the long-term care environment. This will include papers, webinars, conference sessions and expanding research into this area of the continuum.

We hope through these efforts and partnerships we can support the critical dialogue of experience at all points on the care continuum. We will strive to continue our growth as a community encouraging and supporting the dialogue among individuals impacting each touch point in the care experience. If we maintain that experience as defined truly crosses the continuum of care, not only is this a critical effort to take on, it is a must do in ensuring that the experience conversation – the critical confluence of quality, safety and service and the fundamental considerations of people, process and place – engages all and includes all voices. We are excited by this next stage of the experience movement and invite and encourage your thoughts, ideas and participation.

Jason. A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute 

Tags:  choice  community of practice  Continuum of Care  culture  defining patient experience  Field of Patient Experience  HCAHPS  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  Interactions  long term care  patient  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  service excellence  voice 

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The Patient Experience Deserves More Than 63%

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, February 4, 2014

I have yet to meet anyone in healthcare who suggests patient experience is not important. In fact, I often hear it said to be "one of our top priorities”, "a central pillar in our strategy” or "a critical initiative for our organization”. I do not question the sincerity of these declarations or the intent they suggest. I also recognize in the highly dynamic world of healthcare today we are in a constant struggle to balance our priorities. With that, I offer these thoughts to shift our thinking in how we approach experience overall.

To frame what I mean about patient experience I return to the definitiongenerated by the members of The Beryl Institute community – the sum of all interactions, shaped by an organization’s culture, that influence patient perceptions across the continuum of care. I also want to challenge the perspective of some in equating patient experience only to service and question our inside-out focus in healthcare as we often operationally differentiate quality, safety and service. While we may operate these efforts in distinct and at times competing manners, I do not believe patients distinguish between these areas. Yes, we must focus on quality, safety and service and align the appropriate resources to each, but we must address these efforts from the eyes of our consumer and the perspective that they together create but one experience.

As I have continued to hear patient experience identified as a strategic priority, it has caused me to ask, does this mean based on needs there are then specific times when we actually focus on it (and therefore times we don't). That is, do we truly focus on every one of our priorities at all times? Continuing this thought, if patient experience is seen as an initiative, it has all but been declared a limited effort, for every initiative I have experienced in healthcare and elsewhere has a beginning, middle and therefore an end. Do we truly think the patient experience is an idea where the effort eventually concludes?

These ideas around alignment, priority and initiative were supported in the findings of the 2013 Benchmarking Study, The State of Patient Experience in American Hospitals. The research revealed something one could potentially overlook in all that was uncovered. In the U.S. Hospital System the individual with primary responsibility for patient experience spends 63% of their time on these efforts. In contrast, I do not know of a CFO that spends 63% of his time on finances. The data itself reinforces the opportunity we may very well be missing. Have we made patient experience a 63% priority? If we take that to the extreme, does that mean it is only something we consider for 63 out of every 100 patients we see? I do not believe any organization or leader has done this intentionally, but it does cause us to hopefully stop and think about how we lead and operate our organizations and systems.

I know those in healthcare are more committed than what the number reveals. We are an industry of caring and compassionate people who give all they can in every moment. But the data opens our eyes to the opportunities we have. Perhaps what we have lost in our efforts to address patient experience is our realization that experience is all we are about in healthcare. I know that if any one of us were laying on an exam table, recovering in a bed, or sitting holding the hand of a family member that we would not expect anything less than 100%. In fact I believe we would say we want the best in quality, safety and service – the best experience – in every encounter. I believe we all do want the best in patient experience for all those in our care. I hope we too agree the patient experience deserves more than 63%. So how can we start to do things differently today? I look forward to your thoughts.

Jason. A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Metrics and Measurement.

Tags:  bottom line  change  choice  Continuum of Care  culture  defining patient experience  expectations  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interactions  partnership  Patient Experience  priorities  quality  safety  service  service excellence  strategy 

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How Will You Inspire the Patient Experience Movement? Four Considerations for 2014

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Tuesday, January 14, 2014

I am inspired. The New Year has arrived with great energy at The Beryl Institute. We start 2014 as a global community of practice of over 20,000 professionals, focused without hesitation on ensuring the best in experience for patients, families and one another in healthcare.

I am inspired by the continued commitments expressed for this work: by The Beryl Institute’s Patient Experience Scholars who met recently to share their research and reinforce their willingness to encourage and support others; by the members of the Global Patient & Family Advisory Council who want to influence how patients and family members are heard and engaged in making a profound difference in healthcare; by the many contributing to the development of the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge courses soon to be available to the community; and by many more.

I am inspired by how in the first two weeks of a new year, such commitment and intent can emerge, built on all that has come before and focused with purpose on the great opportunities ahead. As I reflect on this idea, a question emerged and perhaps a challenge for each of us to consider:

How will you inspire the patient experience movement in the year ahead?

I pose this question with the hope that actions and considerations from the smallest moments of unparalleled kindness to the largest strategic triumphs all find room to take root and grow. Inspiration comes in all shapes and sizes, but in this diversity it has strong commonalities – it causes us to feel a sense of something special and powerful. It provides a boundless energy to influence, lead, change and make a difference. This is an exciting prospect in seeing that each of us can choose to have an impact. And while no two actions will be exactly alike, I do want to offer a few thoughts on how you can continue to frame your patient experience efforts to inspire yourself and others.

As we return to the definition of patient experience, I continue to experience its relevance time-and-time again in the application of these words to central actions associated with excellence. In reviewing its words – the sum of all interactions, shaped by an organization’s culture, that influence patient perceptions, across the continuum of care – I again see clear directions on moving your own experience efforts forward. They include:

1. Reinforce strategic focus. Patient experience has proven itself to be a relevant part of the healthcare conversation. It has surpassed the challenges of being dubbed a fad; it too has shown it has stronger legs than just serving as a policy framework. Experience is a central strategic pillar to organizational performance and success. Patient Experience in its broadest sense should be a clear and transparent component of every healthcare organization’s strategy.

2. Clarify and map your critical interactions. Experience doesn’t happen on billboards or in espoused actions, it happens at the most personal moments, at those points of engagement between one individual and another. The ultimate tool in patient experience improvement is your self, your heart, your hands and arms, your minds, your compassion and your common sense. We have a huge opportunity to map the interactions that occur on the patient path to ensure we consider the most effective way to respond at every touch point.

3. Model desired behaviors. Simply put, if interactions drive experience, then the behaviors that comprise them are the conduits that direct these interactions in one way or another. Organizational culture is shaped by behaviors, they represent the people, presence and purpose of an organization overall and no slogan, policy or program will trump the power of individual behavior. We must model, observe, coach and improve constantly to impact experience outcomes.

4. Expand your listening. As we ended 2013 exploring the Voices of Measurement, we learned that the power of data is only as valid as what we choose to do with it. Collection or reporting data for the sake of data misses the opportunity for learning and relevant action. To capitalize on the value of the voices that surround us in healthcare we must expand our listening. Experience is measured first in the direct voices of healthcare consumers, who remain our most significant mirror into our own efforts, but it is also found in the voices of our peers and colleagues. We are only capable of achieving our strategy through our people. They are much more than pawns to direct, but rather living resources accountable for ensuring excellence.

Perhaps these ideas will help spark your own thoughts on how you will choose to inspire the patient experience movement. Regardless of which direction you go, I hope you recognize the power that exists in your own personal choice and the ability to impact the experience of the person that is coming next. The year ahead can and should be about a great many things both personally and professionally. My hope is that you find you can and will be an inspiration in your efforts. This cause is too great for your efforts to be anything less. Now the question remains, what will you do? I look forward to your updates with great anticipation.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  accountability  Advocacy  body of knowledge  choice  community of practice  consumer advocacy  Continuum of Care  culture  defining patient experience  employee engagement  Field of Patient Experience  global defining patient experience  global healthcare  HCAHPS  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  Interactions  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  service excellence  thought leadership  voice 

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Reflecting on The Patient Experience Movement: The Power of Voices and Collaboration

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Wednesday, December 18, 2013
Updated: Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Patient Experience - Voices in CollaborationAs we stand at the end of each year, we tend to look back at all that led us to this moment and anticipate all that lies ahead. I stand here now with all of you that comprise our patient experience community, who live and breathe in your every action this patient experience movement, and can say without hesitation that together we have accomplished great things and together there are even more powerful moments to come.

 

This year has exemplified our core values at The Beryl Institute – the importance of community and the integral role of collaboration. We have worked to reinforce the true power of engaging all voices in the patient experience conversation. This gathering of voices has seen our patient experience community grow from 11,000 to 20,000 members and guests this year alone, representing over 45 countries. This gathering of voices has led to a year in which the foundational ideas of this movement have been reinforced and solidified. In our commitment to expand access to the greatest breadth and depth of individuals across healthcare we recently expanded our membership framework to provide access to all associates in any healthcare facility. These Institutional memberships enable staff at all levels, in all roles, across the range of healthcare organizations to engage, to learn and to lead in their own environments.

 

In expanding the conversation on voice itself, this year has been shaped by the Voices of Patient Experience series in which we heard from the C-Suite, front-line practice, students across healthcare disciplines, physicians, patients and families and those measuring the impact of our patient experience efforts. This collection of voices served to complement the many others that contributed to learning and sharing of ideas via webinars and case studies, Patient Experience Conference presentations and On the Road visits. Hundreds of you added your thoughts to the conversation via these and other outlets. This open sense of sharing, of giving, of collaboration has allowed the patient experience movement to thrive.

 

The voices series also raised a significant awareness for the community; to be an organization truly committed to patient experience, we had to move beyond the talk about what we do "to” patients and families, and reinforce an unwavering commitment to do "with”. This partnership in care underlines the very intent of the Institute to provide a place to learn from one another, and it was clear that included the voices of patients and families themselves. This led us to establish the Global Patient & Family Advisory Council, comprised of leading patient and family thinkers, writers, speakers and activists. It also had us collaborate with IHI at the 2013 National Forum to support the "Patient is In” Booth in which patients and family members could share input and ideas with forum participants. These voices remind us of the boundless value of this partnership in patient experience improvement.

 

The expansion of voices also led to the 2ndState of Patient Experience Study, the largest conducted to date on patient experience efforts, and revealed some interesting trends in the both the focus, intent and awareness of patient experience efforts. Yet, while the movement continues to push on, less than 50% of U.S. hospitals have yet to formally define patient experience for themselves. We still have great opportunities to educate and learn from one another.

 

This awareness made it only natural that we expand our efforts overall on the professional development of patient experience champions, furthering the work on the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge with domain outlines and the anticipated release of the domain courses in 2014. As a community you reinforced your desire and the greater need to shape this work in ways that will allow each and every one of us to grow stronger. The year ahead brings even more exciting work on this front.

 

In a recent Hospital Impact blog I mentioned my great excitement about the growth of the patient experience family overall, from new sister organizations to research entities focusing on this area, to critical gatherings in numerous places in support of this important discussion. We will continue to support and reinforce the value of all these efforts and maintain that in collaboration we all win in this movement. We remain committed to serving as a hub and connector of the many voices focused on this effort and keep our arms open for the opportunities for further collaboration.

 

This very idea led to us to begin conversations with and engage in a formal collaboration with the Society for Healthcare Consumer Advocacy (SHCA) and its 40 years of incredible history and commitment to patient voice, rights and advocacy. A strong and storied organization whose roots can be found at the very start of the patient experience movement, SHCA felt they found a home for their future with The Beryl Institute, but I would say while the container is the Institute, the home is the community of peers, of leaders and teachers, of resource providers and caregivers, of patients and families who make up this growing professional home for so many. The integration with SHCA and the purposeful collaboration with a growing number of organizations committed to this cause help reinforce the power that collaboration itself brings to this conversation.

 

I would be remiss if I did not add a personal note to this reflection on the year, that as I stood on stage to close Patient Experience Conference 2013 and received the call that I needed to rush home for the delivery of my son, I shifted abruptly from champion and advocate for a movement to a family member surround by a healthcare system still admittedly learning itself. My eyes were opened, not only by the magic of the birth of a child, but of a family member watching your loved ones cared for, your new child handled, complications managed and tense moments relieved. We must not forget we are all patients and family members and need to continue our work as such.

 

The work you do may at times seem like small gestures, part of your standard process or even done automatically as a seasoned veteran, but to a patient or family member you are providing an incredible gesture of service, of quality, of safety – of experience. In every moment we have the choice to create the experience for our patients and their families. And every moment each of you as members of this community, of this movement, have that choice as well…to engage, to learn, to contribute, and to encourage the involvement of others.

 

You see this is your community, it is built on the power of your voices, it is driven by the collaboration we find with one another and it is from that place that we look to the new year knowing that the greatest opportunities still lie ahead. Thank you for your contributions, support and leadership. May you have a healthy and happy holiday and be ready with great excitement for all the New Year will bring.

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Communication.

Tags:  Advocacy  body of knowledge  community of practice  consumer advocacy  defining patient experience  Field of Patient Experience  improving patient experience  partnership  Patient Experience  thought leadership  voice 

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A Patient Experience Lesson from the Latest U.S. Congressional Showdown

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Tuesday, October 1, 2013
Updated: Tuesday, October 1, 2013

While I don't wade into the political spectrum often in these discussions, in light of the news of the day, I am hard pressed not to at least share a reflection on what is taking place in Washington, D.C., its impact on the U.S. Healthcare system, and the broader economic implications it is presumed to have. I do not intend to advocate for one position or another here, but rather share a core reflection on the lesson I see for patient experience professionals in the current state of affairs.

For those of us in healthcare (and in reality for all of those that are not), this week signifies a historic time with some of the first steps underway in the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, also referred to as Obamacare. Regardless of the actions (or inactions) on Capitol Hill, and whether you are in support of or against it, the healthcare law will move forward for now. I do not intend to break down the law and examine its detailed impact on the patient experience here. Rather, I hope to share a simple but significant realization about the entire U.S. Healthcare system revealed in this debate.

Recent polls conducted separately by both Fox News and CNBC found that when asked, Americans often distinguish between the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Obamacare. Much of this distinction is driven from the very mouths of congressional and other political leaders. In fact in exploring people's opinions on the programs under these two naming conventions there was a variance in the value, interest and support for each of these programs. The challenge (or perhaps surprise) in this discovery is that in fact these two programs are exactly the same thing - the ACA is Obamacare and vice versa.

The reality is in healthcare we have many words that raise this same challenge in our delivery system, driven by providers, supported by payors and serving patients and families. The example above, of divergent opinions on, in essence, the same idea, driven by language, expert opinion or pure rhetoric, is one of the best I have seen reinforcing with clear data the power of language and more importantly perception.

The concept of perception - the way you think about or understand someone or something – is a central part of the patient experience itself. Defining patient experience as the sum of all interactions, shaped by an organization’s culture, that influence patient (and family) perceptions across the continuum of care makes explicit that perception is both the result of experience and also the lens through which people make choices now and into the future around their care.

For the reported confusion created in the language around two names for the same healthcare law – ACA or Obamacare – there are limitless levels of confusion created in the language of our healthcare system itself, from diagnosis to medications, acronyms to systemic issues. In the simplest of terms we all too often and in many cases unintentionally create confusions for the healthcare community, our patients and their families in the terminology and language we choose to use. I recently sat on a panel at DePaul University on the future of healthcare in the U.S. and this very issue emerged – that in creating true accessibility we have to not only have the proper processes and checklists in place, but also the right, and perhaps more importantly, the clearest language possible.

I am not suggesting the healthcare system is facing the same levels of dysfunction as the U.S. Congress, but I do believe there is a great opportunity for clarity in making the healthcare experience easier and better for all receiving care. Finding language that works for patients and families, as well as for those working in the system, will only serve to better engage and inform patients and families and support the invaluable nature of their role as partners in the healthcare process.

This could perhaps be one of the first and most important steps in driving patient experience success. There is power in language, in its application and perception…the US congress taught us that again this week in a way I don't think we cared to learn. But in this chaos I see a silver lining, an important lesson for all of us either entrusted with and/or committed to the best in patient experience. Manage perceptions with clarity and honesty in each and every healthcare encounter. It may not change the system overnight, but it will have a positive and powerful ripple effect that will be very hard to diminish.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  ACA  Continuum of Care  defining patient experience  healthcare  improving patient experience  Leadership  Patient Experience 

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Patients are Partners in Experience, Not Just Recipients of One

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Thursday, June 6, 2013
Updated: Thursday, June 6, 2013

In my most recent Hospital Impact blog I noted that "how” we choose to do things in healthcare will and should trump the "what”. This is supported by my travels through numerous healthcare organizations where it is becoming evident that the core practices organizations are using to drive patient experience success are more and more consistent. While some might see this as limiting, I see it as encouraging.

Why is that? It means we are listening to one another, learning from each other and showing an incredible willingness to "steal ideas shamelessly” as a well respected CEO once shared with me in describing a component of their organizational success. That means the ‘what’ we do is not very different location to location. The distinguishing characteristic in experience is not the things you do, but the way in which your deliver. This is at the core of the very definition of patient experience as "the sum of all interactions, shaped by an organization’s culture”.

This ability to listen and learn from one another is a central value of all we do at The Beryl Institute. As a global community of practice we can (and must) learn from all edges of the community – those Institutions rated the "best” or seen as the "biggest” do not represent the only expertise. Rather it is in trying and executing of ideas in organizations of all shapes, sizes and focus through which excellence is supported and shared. It is based on this premise that the idea of a broad and inclusive range of voices has been so central to our work.

In returning to the conversation of "how”, I reflect on the recent conversations I had with 18 incredible patient and family advocates committed to the work of improving quality, safety and service for patients and families around the world in preparing the most recent paper from The Beryl Institute – Voices of Patients and Families: Partners in the Patient Experience. The stories these individual’s shared of compassion personified and at times the uglier side of care help us realize that there is power in how we choose to manage the interactions we have in healthcare every day. That it is truly more than the tactics, and rather the execution that matters.

The point I make here is all the tactics in the world amount to very little if all they are is something we do TO people in our care. The old language of provider and recipient may well still be used in healthcare, but its use is outdated and indicative of a system in need of change. Patients – yes, you and I, our children and parents, family and friends – are active parts of the healthcare equation, not passive recipients of it. We need to ensure we start acting this way. This perspective is exemplified through the work of such great organizations as the Society for Participatory Medicine.

While there are countless lessons shared by the individuals interviewed in the Voices paper, we inherently know many of them ourselves. Our contributors helped frame three central ideas in ensuring partnership in the care environment:

1. Acknowledge patients are not subjects in the healthcare process or "something” you should talk about or plan for in third person.

2. Recognize patients are not necessarily wired to actively engage in the healthcare process, due both to the complexity of healthcare and the nature of the system itself (that potentially diminishes the role of the patient in an unspoken hierarchy of expertise). You must ask, encourage, and act on the patient’s voice.

3. Consider coordinating efforts to identify and incorporate patient perceptions into the overall planning of care.

Personally, as I continue the journey of new fatherhood, I saw this play out in the very interactions we have had with our pediatrician. At our stage as new parents, we could be scolded, challenged or even talked down to about how we handle situations. Instead our doc engages us based on our questions, our hopes and fears. I know she is getting all the needed clinical work done, but she is including us as patients and family, as partners in the process. This is an active decision on her part, it is one that engages us in the care of our son and ensures a positive experience with every visit. "How” is a choice we can all make in healthcare and is one I believe will make all the difference.

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Patient & Family Centeredness.

Tags:  bottom line  choice  culture  defining patient experience  employee engagement  expectations  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  Interactions  partnership  patient engagement  Patient Experience  patient stories  service excellence 

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