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Increasing the Value of The Beryl Institute Membership

Posted By Denise R. Weathers, Thursday, March 8, 2018
Updated: Thursday, March 8, 2018

For years, The Beryl Institute has offered the community a growing library of resources to support you in leading a positive patient experience effort for your organization. Over the past year, the Institute has experienced some major accomplishments highlighted in our 2017 Year In Review. As we continue the commitment to improving the human experience by offering value-added resources and services, the need for our members become ever so important. The question has become – how can The Beryl Institute best serve its members and the patient experience community?

Through our Annual Member Experience Survey distributed in December 2017, you helped us address this question by providing your much-deserved feedback. To highlight a few observations, we asked what you thought of the services that are being offered by the Institute. Similar to previous survey results, the top six most-valued and accessed member benefits are Publications, such as White Papers and Research Reports, Webinars, E- Newsletters (PX Monthly and PX Newslink), Learning Bites, PX Connect, the latest member benefit and the PX Conference.

Although the above-mentioned resources were rated as the most-valued resources, the one word that was consistent throughout the survey feedback and placed an even wider smile on our faces was “Community.” Relationships are considered by many to be the most important and satisfying aspect of life, and your partnership with The Beryl Institute provides you with a diverse global community of physicians, nurses, patient experience leaders, patient and family advisors, consultants, etc., in various healthcare settings, coming together to support one common goal…to improve the patient and human experience in healthcare. Community matters in patient experience and we must ensure it does for the power of the collection of voices in our movement and in the work, it calls us to do every day.

Community speaks to the heart of who we are and to the resources and opportunities we develop for you to engage in for learning, the collection and dissemination of ideas and the connection among peers such as your ability to connect in the recent addition of the online member community, PX Connect, and by attending the 2018 PX Conference, coming up next month April 16-18 at the Hyatt Regency Chicago.

The Power of community has also been elevated with the recent emergence of the PX Policy Forum and the newly formed Nurse Executive Council. To further increase the value of your membership, the Institute has or is taking steps to improve your member experience by providing:

 

Enhanced offerings for professional development and learning exploring how the Institute can elevate the partner organizations and speakers who present at its professional development learning areas such as webinars, PX Conference, Regional Roundtables and PX Grand Rounds; engaging and leveraging discussions in the online patient experience member community, PX Connect, to develop untapped content and resources; and, organizing content collaboration targets for specific areas we recognize may have some gaps such as Ambulatory Care, Physician Office Setting and Long-Term Care, to name a few.

 

 Increased member benefit awareness with enhanced communications highlighting targeted member benefits such as: Career Center, expanded volunteer opportunities and PX Connect, and include Patient Experience Continuing Education (PXE) credit offerings through most of the professional development and learning programs, pending approval.

 

Innovation, research and global presence by adding an Experience Innovation position to expand the Institute’s global landscape of groundbreaking advancements in the PX evolution.


It is our commitment to be that organization…that patient experience community that identifies and address your needs more effectively and one that provides an optimal suite of patient experience resources, products and services at the most affordable investment and value.

The Beryl Institute staff are here to serve you. We hope the continued focus on improving the resources, products and services display our commitment and our drive to showcase and support you and your organization on your patient experience journey.

Do you have ideas on how we could continue to increase the value of The Beryl Institute membership? Email me at denise.weathers@theberylinstitute.org with your ideas and suggestions.

 

Denise R. Weathers
Vice President, Membership
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  commitment  Community  community of practice  member benefit  member survey  member value  px connect 

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A New View: An Unwavering Commitment to the Human Experience in Healthcare

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Thursday, August 3, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, August 1, 2017

This month’s Patient Experience blog is an excerpt from the recently released research report, The State of Patient Experience 2017: A Return to Purpose.

We have always maintained that in patient experience there are no major secrets and with that believe strongly that the differentiator is not in the private processes you create or the proprietary models an organization might produce. Rather it is in the spirit of an open sharing of ideas through which all should play and in the distinction of a true commitment to execution through which you should compete. Experience will be and is already emerging as a key, if not the primary, differentiator in healthcare. The opportunity in front of each organization is how they will seize this moment.

For us at the Institute, part of this moment is to acknowledge that patient experience will forever be central to healthcare, but also as we learn from the community and from the very data in this year’s benchmarking study the healthcare experience we are speaking to reaches beyond patient experience itself. In an environment where we clearly base all work on human beings caring for human beings we are ultimately addressing and impacting the human experience in our midst. For this reason, we believe at The Beryl Institute as we remain committed to patient experience we must address the reality of the human experience that is central to healthcare overall.

With this, we have set a bold and fundamental desired impact for how we look to move into the years ahead. Our intended focus is simple, clear and true:

Changing healthcare by advancing an unwavering commitment to the human experience.

In doing this we honor the work each of you are doing and the reality of the healthcare world we find ourselves collectively creating around the globe. In a commitment to shift how healthcare works, we must dedicate ourselves to the broader human experience, honoring both the patient experience at its core and the experience of all driving and supporting healthcare’s efforts every day. With that we believe this commitment must be grounded on four key points:

  • Understanding experience is defined as the sum of all interactions shaped by an organization’s culture, that influence patient perceptions across the continuum of care.
  • Acknowledging experience (1) encompasses the critical elements of healthcare from quality, safety and service, to cost and population health issues that drive decisions, impact access and ensure equity and (2) reaches beyond the clinical encounter to all interactions one has with the healthcare system.
  • Recognizing that human experience reinforces the fundamental principle of partnership and is therefore inclusive of the experiences of those receiving and delivering care as well as all who support them.
  • Reinforcing that focused action on experience drives positive clinical outcomes, strong financial results, clear consumer loyalty, solid community reputation and broad staff and patient/family engagement.

This commitment has been spurred by all we have seen in this work and by all each member of the broader patient experience community has taught us. As we travel a journey to reinforce the critical role of the human experience in healthcare all that we learned in this year’s study takes on even greater relevance.

We must strive for what we believe is important collectively and then ensure we find ways in each and every one of our organizations to apply these principles, practices, ideas and findings for the good of all engaged. This is not idealism, but rather a practical reflection on where we are and what we can achieve. The state of patient experience is about much more than what we have or will do, to what we are and what we can become. That is the inspiration we glean from those that contributed their voices in this year’s study and the motivation we garner from working collectively as a community dedicated to the human experience in healthcare.

The state of patient experience is strong, your efforts and commitment are true and the possibilities of all we can accomplish as a result are yet to be realized. That makes this perhaps one of the most exciting times to be committed to this work. We look forward to traveling the next steps of this journey with each of you.

> Download the full State of Patient Experience 2017 research report


Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., CPXP

President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  community of practice  culture  global healthcare  healthcare  Human Experience  Patient Experience 

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There’s No Place like Home…The Value of Connecting with Your Patient Experience Community

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Tuesday, June 13, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, June 13, 2017

I recently chatted with one of our members after she returned from another healthcare conference. While she enjoyed the event, she shared that the experience itself felt dramatically different than her time at our March Patient Experience Conference in Denver. I asked a few questions to try to understand what the difference was. The breakout sessions were great, the keynote speakers were inspiring, and it was a large crowd of other leaders in similar types of roles. Yet, she still felt something was lacking. Upon further reflection, she realized the missing element was the sense of community and emotional connection she experiences every year at The Beryl Institute conference.

Her comments reinforced feedback received after this year’s Patient Experience Conference. Participants said things such as, “Everyone was so kind and helpful…it was easy to meet people…it was so wonderful to be surrounded by like-minded people…we're all in this together!” These statements reflect things we hear often at the Institute, an appreciation for the welcoming and engaging community that has developed through a shared passion for building and sustaining the patient experience movement. 

Our community connects in many ways throughout the year – chatter on social media, regular discussions on listservs, and conversations through Topic Calls and Patient Advocacy Connection Calls. In recent months, we’ve also enjoyed watching dialogue between members explode in the chat box of our regular webinars where participants share where they’re logging in from, reconnect with old friends and tap into the tremendous wealth of knowledge that is represented in this patient experience community.

The virtual connections are powerful and a hallmark of The Beryl Institute. While these opportunities are invaluable, I would argue there is no replacement for spending time together in person. As the patient experience movement has grown, we’ve witnessed incredible connections between the leaders doing this work and an amazing energy and enthusiasm that comes when we gather together to share ideas, connect and learn. Our community believes patient experience is a foundational element of the overall healthcare experience, and there is something about getting together in person that inspires us to live and share that message.

At The Beryl Institute we continue to foster opportunities for face-to-face connections. Last week we announced the opening of the Call for Submissions for breakout sessions at Patient Experience Conference 2018 to be held April 16-18 in Chicago. We hope you will join us there and even consider submitting a proposal to share your patient experience successes.
 
But even before then we have many opportunities for you to engage face-to-face with patient experience peers. This fall we’ll hold Patient Experience Regional Roundtables in Canada, California, Louisiana and New York. Regional Roundtables are one-day programs bringing together the voices of healthcare leaders, staff, physicians, patients and families to convene, engage and expand the dialogue on improving patient experience. Through inspiring keynote sessions and working group discussion, participants leave with an expanded network, renewed energy and actionable ideas to support patient experience efforts in their own organizations.

We also have two upcoming Certified Patient Experience Professional (CPXP) preparation workshops. These are opportunities to gather with other patient experience leaders to not only network and share, but to prepare together for the CPXP exam. Community members will gather later this month in Chicago and in September in Los Angeles for full day courses reviewing the domains outlined in the job classification on which the CPXP examination is based. 

The Beryl Institute continues to be the global community of practice dedicated to improving the patient experience through collaboration and shared knowledge. We are a welcoming and engaging community. I am often reminded of an early Patient Experience Conference where a participant stood up and joyfully proclaimed “I have found my professional home!”  As a leader in the movement, we hope you view the Institute as your professional home, and we invite you to further connect with your patient experience family. 


Stacy Palmer, CPXP
Senior Vice President
The Beryl Institute 

Tags:  community of practice  Field of Patient Experience  healthcare  improving patient experience  leadership  networking  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  thought leadership 

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Patient Experience: A Global Conversation

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Thursday, May 4, 2017
Updated: Thursday, May 4, 2017

I am writing this blog as we wrap up the 2017 Patient Experience Symposium in Sydney. The event, a collaboration among healthcare and consumer organizations in Australia committed to engaging in and expanding the conversation on patient experience, comes on the heels of an incredible Patent Experience Week where we saw organizations from around the globe celebrating those committed to excellence in patient experience. In that same period, we had the release of the latest issue of Patient Experience Journal (PXJ) that brought together perspectives from around the world and is now read in over 190 countries and territories.

As I reflect on just these last few days, they represent a significant statement about where the patient experience movement is going. They also offer us some perspective on the opportunity we have before us and the efforts we must consider in moving to action overall. The experience movement that bloomed in the last decade and that some called a fad that would soon pass or an idea that would be obscured by shifting policy focus or diluted by competing priorities, instead has found itself expanding with purpose.

As Jane Cummings, CNO England wrote in her commentary in the latest PXJ, “the global dialogue on patient experience will become even more important, as we recognise that despite differences in design and operation, the challenges our health systems face and the focus on what matters most to patients are shared.” This recognition that we are moving to a macro effort, acknowledging the reality of our own individual systemic constraints not as impediments, but perhaps learning points to be leveraged is where opportunity calls us. In looking across systems boundaries and peeling back policy layers, we reveal fundamentals that rest solidly at the heart of the experience conversation. These ideas were reinforced in the latest State of Patient Experience data just released during Patient Experience Conference 2017.

  1. Experience must remain an integrated focus on quality, safety, service and more. To provide the best in experience and effect positive change, we can no longer force boundaries between these efforts in the face that they are all part of what patients, families and consumers encounter.
  2. The fastest growing area of focus for organizations in addressing experience is employee engagement. This rapid rise in both recognition of and focus on staff needs in the healthcare ecosystem is fundamental and significant. The idea that we must take care of ourselves to take care of others, is not just motherly advice, but sound strategic thinking in a business where we are human beings caring for human beings.
  3. In finding employee engagement at the heart of all we do, it is forever intertwined with the engagement of patients and family members as partners in this work, not only in their own care plans, but in the very work we must do to redesign our systems of care, co-design new processes and better understand the needs of those we serve. My visit this last two weeks in Australia and the opportunity to engage with both the consumer councils in New South Wales and Western Australia reinforced the critical point that patients, family and community members are partners in and consumers of care. This idea spans our globe and must be central to any actions we take.

In all that I had the chance to see and learn during my last 10 days in Australia, what was shared over PX Week and is part of the ongoing patient experience conversation, not only are these core ideas central across time zones, there are core practices that follow as well. These include ideas such as the intentional collection of actionable data – both through formal survey methods and now more so in real time to address critical issues and build cases for change, interdisciplinary rounds and bedside shift reports and handoffs, creating formal structures and processes for engaging patients and families on councils, boards and committees and expanding how staff and employees can provide feedback and contribute to improvements.

In finding core ideas and common ground, we must also acknowledge the work of patient experience is not easy work. It is not something we master simply by creating checklists or wrangle with protocols. It is something that requires strategic commitment, an openness to collaboration and sharing and perhaps most of all an acknowledgement that we are all in this effort together. There is a global conversation taking place on patient experience, one focused on creating the best healthcare systems driving the best results on all corners of our globe.

We must now be willing to share wildly and steal willingly in order to learn from one another and improve. That is our greatest and most critical opportunity and one we should not take lightly. We are in a unique and opportune moment in healthcare, for as an industry in serving those in front of us, we can and will bring this world closer. It is a conversation I am honored to be a part of and one I, and I hope each of you, will strive every day to champion.

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., CPXP
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  collaboration  community of practice  employee engagement  global  partnership  patient and family engagement  patient experience week  state of patient experience 

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Reaffirming the Core Values of Patient Experience

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Friday, February 3, 2017
Updated: Friday, February 3, 2017

The idea that healthcare is, at its core, about human beings caring for human beings is not a new or surprising notion, but the foundations of this concept seem more relevant today for all the challenges we in healthcare, and now in many ways those beyond, are working to overcome. As we look to where the experience movement has come from to where it is rapidly moving, we find it is grounded in the fundamentals of all that is right and good at the core of our humanity. The patient experience in healthcare is ultimately the human experience. It is encountered in every healthcare interaction and impacts and is affected by not just those receiving care, but by all engaged in ensuring it is delivered with the utmost in quality, safety and service.

I have watched the recent events taking place both in the United States and around the world with both great curiosity and some concern. The first words used to define patient experience – the sum of all interactions – may be no more important now as we work to not only be cognizant of the interactions we each have, but also to reinforce the power that exists in ensuring positive interactions are at the core of all we do. These interactions, as the definition continues, are shaped by the very culture we create and espouse in the organizations and systems we build and sustain. And this culture must be grounded in the values we hold true in guiding our decisions and framing our actions.

It seemed now was an appropriate and important time to reinforce and reaffirm the core values we introduced in late 2015 that have been central to our work at The Beryl Institute. We have also continued to find these values implicitly at work in the many organizations striving to achieve experience excellence overall. With all that is pushing and pulling at us in recent days, as people ponder the future of healthcare policy and practice and as we consider the broader implications on human connectivity, it seemed time to reiterate both our commitment to these values, as well as call on all committed to this work, and to the greater human experience, to reflect on what these ideas truly mean. I list our values below with my thoughts on their importance today:

  • ACCESSIBILITY. I have always believed in a focus on experience as in life we have a great opportunity with a mindset of abundance.  Accessibility is about fairness and equity, about providing opportunity and the ability to connect to information and people, and to do so in a way that removes barriers to and actively encourages engagement and a free exchange of ideas.
  • AGILITY. In a world that is no longer measured by years or even months, but rather pushed on one side by rapid increases in technology and on the other by ceaseless waves of information, people and the organizations they comprise must be anything but static in thought, process or action. It is no longer about readiness to change, but the ability to be changing always, while ensuring consistency to your commitments and desired outcomes.
  • INNOVATION. The same pressures that call for our agility require we no longer look backward for how things can, have or should be done. In listening, exploring, doing and being willing to fail we push the very boundaries that could otherwise restrain our ability to move with (and if intentional in our efforts, lead) the very changes we need.
  • INCLUSIVITY. This idea at the heart of experience may be no more critical than today. From all voices matter in patient experience to underlining all voices matter, perspectives have value, diversity adds flavor and difference catalyzes opportunities for even greater outcomes. We cannot and must not let fear or worse, lack of understanding, cause us to shrink from one another when it is the very interactions we create, engage in and encourage that will remain fundamental to the human experience. On this we must remain steadfast.
  • COLLABORATION. At the roots of the Institute itself was the belief that if we are willing to share our ideas openly, without hesitation, we would reap greater returns than we could working alone in the dark. This idea of connection has been essential to our own growth and exemplifies a great opportunity we still have overall. If we all believe we are here for an ultimate goal, be it experience excellence, or something greater, it calls on us to find the bridges that lead us to connection and opportunity, not the chasms that seed distinctions, misunderstanding and missed possibility.

We are at an exciting time in the experience movement. I believe we are entering an experience era that reinforces all that is good about what each and every one of you strive to do each day in working to personally heal and/or provide healing for others. In each of our personal journeys is a great opportunity to travel this path with not only an understanding of ourselves, but perhaps more so with an unwavering commitment to others. In reaffirming the values we hold true to patient experience, we are making a statement about all we believe is right and good as human beings caring for human beings around the world. That must remain our cause.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., CPXP
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  collaboration  commitment  community of practice  connection  culture  experience era  global  healthcare policy  policy  values 

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The Spirit of the PX Movement – Sharing, Learning and Improving Together

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Monday, December 12, 2016
Updated: Monday, December 12, 2016

After six years as a membership community focused on improving patient experience, we continue to be amazed and inspired by the generosity of our members and guests committed to this movement. The spirit of this work is illustrated perfectly by the willingness to share, learn and grow together.

Just last week we released a great example of this in action through the white paper, Guiding Principles for Patient Experience Excellence. We’re careful to always acknowledge there is no one recipe for improving patient experience, but we have identified eight themes consistent in organizations who have found success in this work. The paper shares those principles, reflects on why each is a critical consideration and, perhaps most importantly, highlights specific examples from 15 organizations who excel in one or more of these areas.

As in all the work shared through the Institute, the examples represent only a sample of the many approaches that could be tied to each principle. They are offered to spark thinking in ways others can move from concept to action. It’s the willingness of these organizations to share their successes that fuels that thinking for others.

The gifting of knowledge and experiences has helped to build the field of patient experience and establishes both credibility and accountability for our efforts. This year our sister organization, Patient Experience Institute, recognized the first three classes of Certified Patient Experience Professionals (CPXPs), an incredible statement and stride for the movement. We continue to see this work validated and see our community eager to spread the word on the importance of addressing experience excellence and sharing successes and challenges encountered along the way.

We wholeheartedly offer thanks to every individual and organization who contributed to this work over the past year. Thank you for every case study shared, On the Road visit or regional roundtable hosted, webinar or conference session presented, ListServ email sent, topic call or connection call attended and learning bite delivered. It’s through these and other collective efforts that we can truly shape this movement and positively impact the experiences of patients, families and caregivers.

Interested in learning more about how you can personally contribute to the community in 2017? Visit http://www.theberylinstitute.org/?page=CONNECTIONIDEAS.

 

Stacy Palmer, CPXP
Senior Vice President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  accountability  collaboration  community  community of practice  engagement  Field of Patient Experience  healthcare  improving patient experience  networking  patient experience  thought leadership 

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Supporting the Expanding Field of Patient Experience

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Thursday, June 9, 2016
Updated: Thursday, June 9, 2016

This week we opened the call for submissions for Patient Experience Conference 2017. It will mark the seventh official year for this event, the annual gathering bringing together the collective voices of healthcare professionals and patients/families across the globe to convene, engage in and expand the dialogue on improving patient experience. 

Each year we’ve seen significant increases is conference participation, with almost 1,000 people gathering in Dallas this past April to share, learn and network with one another. Similarly The Beryl Institute community itself continues to grow, now made up of over 45,000 members and guests from 55 countries. We believe this growth signifies the expansion of the patient experience movement. Leaders are realizing a focus on experience is a necessity for survival in the ever-changing healthcare environment.

We’ve watched the field develop with some organizations now appointing Chief Experience Officers to guide efforts and strategy. Patient Experience Institute, a sister organization of The Beryl Institute, has established a formal designation for Certified Patient Experience Professionals – and over 140 organizations now have one or more CPXPs on staff. Hundreds of individuals are expanding their professional development through the PX Body of Knowledge certificate programs. And Patient Experience Week was established to celebrate those who positively impact experience every day. 

Without a doubt, the field of patient experience is expanding.

This expansion continues to change the dynamics of The Beryl Institute Community. When we began as a membership organization in late 2010, most of our members were just getting started on their patient experience journeys. They were incredibly willing to share the successes and struggles along the way – which led to the abundance of community-developed content that exists and continues to grow today.

While we’ll always offer resources, support and encouragement to those beginning their efforts, we must continue to elevate the conversation to also support those further along on their journeys. Many of you are now looking to the community for information on how you can take things to the next level. How do you sustain your programs? What can you do to develop deeper engagement opportunities with patients and family members? How can you bring down silos that exist within your organization? How do you integrate social media into experience efforts?

The expansion of the field and our commitment to provide the breadth and levels of content needed to support the community led us to a significant change in the conference call for submissions process for 2017. As you complete the submission form for a standard breakout, mini session or poster – and we invite you to consider doing so – you’ll be asked to identify the development stage for your content, specifically your submission is ideal for individuals with:

  • Minimal knowledge and experience. Looking for some basic information, key principles and "how to’s” on the subject.
  • Working knowledge and some proven experience. Looking for breath or depth in the subject, how to sustain and engage others and/or dealing with resistance to change on the subject. 
  • Authoritative knowledge and proven success. Looking for advanced knowledge and examples to evolve their understanding and practice on the subject. 

This is the scale our Learning and Professional Development team considers regularly as they develop content for our webinars, topic calls and other resources, and we're excited to now apply this process to Patient Experience Conference. This information will guide our volunteer reviewers and conference planning committee to develop a well-balanced program that meets the needs of participants at all levels. We’ll identify sessions as beginning, intermediate or advanced so you can make the most-informed choices on what sessions you will attend to customize your learning experience. 

It’s important to acknowledge, however, that levels of learning can be both subjective and cyclical. Organizations who once excelled at certain facets of patient experience may find themselves slipping in that area over time and in need of a basic refresher. And organizations just beginning a patient experience journey might have certain areas in which they already perform well ahead of the curve. There will always be a need to support all levels of development and we are committed to sharing that breadth of resources.  We thank you in advance for your contributions to the community. Sharing your story and knowledge truly represents the core idea that we are ALL the Patient Experience!


Stacy Palmer
Vice President, Strategy and Member Experience 
The Beryl Institute
 

Tags:  collaboration  commitment  community  community of practice  engagement  Field of Patient Experience  global healthcare  healthcare  improving patient experience  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  service excellence 

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Reflecting on the Field of Patient Experience

Posted By Deanna Frings, Tuesday, April 5, 2016
Updated: Tuesday, April 5, 2016

I was recently invited to participate in a panel discussion on the topic of talent and the patient experience at an event for healthcare human resource professionals.  The event says so much about how far we have come in our understanding of what it takes to support patient experience excellence and this emerging field.  Preparing for this event gave me the opportunity to step back and reflect on the field of patient experience. 

Prior to joining the team at The Beryl Institute, I was a member of this global community of practice and attended the PX Conference in 2012.  It was here that I first heard about the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge, a framework of 15 broadly accepted domains reflecting the knowledge and skills of a patient experience professional.  

As I sat listening to the details of the framework and how it came to be, I was thrilled not only because over 400 individuals from 10 countries contributed to its development but it was the first time I began thinking about what I did as a growing profession, a field of practice and an emerging field.  I had something concrete to take back to my own organization that so clearly framed this field of patient experience and defined its core ideas.  

You see, my entry into patient experience started like many across the country.  I was asked to be part of a committee within my health system charged with implementing tactics that would improve our patient satisfaction scores.  Over the next several years, that committee membership evolved to a dedicated role as the Director of Patient and Family Relations leading the organization’s efforts on building a culture of experience excellence.  Our journey was very similar to others as evidenced in the findings of The State of the Patient Experience 2015 Study showing a growing acknowledgement from senior executives on the importance of investing resources dedicated to patient experience leaders. 

Fast forwarding to late spring 2014, I had been in my role with The Beryl Institute as the Director of Learning & Professional Development for one year and we had launched the first five PX Body of Knowledge courses.  In 2015, we achieved a major milestone when all 15 courses became available, one for each domain.   It was the first time a comprehensive program was available supporting professional development of healthcare leaders in the field of patient experience. 

We have since awarded a total of over 60 Certificates in Patient Experience Leadership and Patient Advocacy and there are over 250 currently completing the PX Body of Knowledge courses.  Not only do these numbers show the high level of interest patient experience professionals have in developing their knowledge and skills but they show again the acknowledgement by senior executives of the critical role of leadership in achieving patient experience excellence.

As I come to a close with my reflections, I would be remiss if I did not mention the incredible work at our sister organization, Patient Experience Institute.  Following a rigorous and standardized process and involving hundreds of members of the global patient experience community, the first inaugural Certified Patient Experience Professional (CPXP) exam was launched this past December. Achievement of CPXP certification highlights a commitment to the profession and to maintaining current skills and knowledge in supporting and expanding the field of patient experience and demonstrates clear qualifications to senior leaders, colleagues, and the industry. 

It’s always nice to reflect back as a means to identify the progress made. We know patient experience matters, it continues to be a top priority and there is a growing acknowledgement of the critical need and value for dedicated patient experience leaders.  And to that end, we must all take action in shaping the future field of patient experience.

  1. There is a recognized need for individuals with the knowledge and skills to lead patient experience efforts.  Use the PX Body of Knowledge framework to assess your professional development needs and build a plan to advance your knowledge and skills.
  2. Everyone plays an important role in the patient experience.  Share the framework with your Human Resource partners and work with them integrating the patient experience leadership competencies as part of an overall talent management strategy.
  3. Senior Leaders recognize that leadership is a strategic asset.  Be a role model and distinguish yourself as a leader in today’s healthcare marketplace.  Work within your organization's advocating and in supporting all healthcare leaders have the skills and knowledge critical to ensure the best experiences for your patients, their families and your employees positioning your organization to drive the best in outcomes for all you serve.  

As the journey continues, I’m excited about the future.  I encourage each of you to be part of the ongoing conversation sharing your ideas on how to support, educate and influence the many leaders across all functions within your organization.  I know I'm looking forward to the conversation next week with healthcare human resource professionals as they explore their role in ensuring an excellent experience for all.

Deanna Frings
Director, Learning and Professional Development
The Beryl Institute

 

Tags:  community  community of practice  employee engagement  engagement  healthcare  improving patient experience  Leadership  Patient Experience  service excellence 

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How Will You Invest in Patient Experience in 2016?

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Tuesday, December 1, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, December 1, 2015

We recently celebrated our first five years as a community of practice and looked back, somewhat in awe, at the incredible growth of this organization over such a short time. The Beryl Institute is now a global community of almost 40,000 individuals passionate about improving the healthcare experience for patients, families and caregivers.

The momentum continues, as does the realization that organizations are making significant investments in time, energy and dollars to ensure they are prepared to deliver the best possible patient experience. We see these investments in many forms from hiring teams to training leaders and staff to building and supporting cultures of excellence.

As we shared in the 2015 State of Patient Experience Benchmarking study, senior patient experience leadership and staff investment is growing with 42% of respondents having a Chief Experience Officer (or comparable position) compared to only 22% two years ago.  Along with that, the size of patient experience teams is growing; 33% of organizations reported having five or more staff members supporting patient experience efforts. 

The Beryl Institute community reflects this trend as well. This year over 200 organizations will invest in institutional membership – meaning they provide unlimited access to the Institute’s white papers, webinars, topic calls, learning bites, etc. to everyone within their facility. They are making a statement that people in ALL roles impact the patient experience and should have access to research and collaboration that will assist their efforts.

We have also seen tremendous interest in learning and professional development programs intended to train patient experience leaders and other staff. We recently increased our virtual classroom offerings in the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge courses to support growing participation in the community-developed program that provides Certificates in Patient Experience Leadership and Patient Advocacy.

Patient Experience Conference had its largest attendance to date this year and we were honored to partner with member organizations to host sold out Regional Roundtable events in San Francisco, Charlotte and Minneapolis. Our community is eager to gain (and share) knowledge and to invest in their personal career growth. In fact, today our sister organization, Patient Experience Institute, will offer the first testing opportunity for those hoping to earn their CPXP, the professional certification for Patient Experience Leaders.

While we’re excited to celebrate the five-year milestone, we acknowledge how much work is still to be done. We imagine (and hope to help inspire) a world where all healthcare organizations appreciate the power and impact of patient experience efforts and make without hesitation the investments necessary to be the best they can be for patients and families.

Earlier this year we released Our Stand, a list of guiding principles we’ve identified in our five years of leading this work that can have significant impact on patient experience success. I share them again as a reminder as you evaluate your own efforts and consider what investment opportunities make sense to support your specific needs.

We believe organizations and systems committed to providing the best in experience WILL:

  • Identify and support accountable leadership with committed time and focused intent to shape and guide experience strategy
  • Establish and reinforce a strong, vibrant and positive organizational culture and all it comprises
  • Develop a formal definition for what experience is to their organization
  • Implement a defined process for continuous patient and family input and engagement
  • Engage all voices in driving comprehensive, systemic and lasting solutions
  • Look beyond clinical experience of care to all interactions and touch points
  • Focus on alignment across all segments of the continuum and the spaces in between
  • Encompass both a focus on healing and a commitment to well-being

As you prepare for the coming year I challenge you to reflect on your organization’s commitment to experience improvement. Where are you exceling and where are your opportunities to do even more for your patients, families, caregivers and staff? Our patient experience community is here to support your journey and I encourage you to take full advantage of the incredible resources and knowledge available. 

Wishing you a wonderful holiday season and a successful New Year!

 

Stacy Palmer
Vice President, Strategy and Member Experience
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  body of knowledge  certification  collaboration  community of practice  Continuum of Care  culture  employee engagement  Field of Patient Experience  global healthcare  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  Interactions  Leadership  Nurse Leadership  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  Regional Roundtable  service excellence 

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Patients and Families Included

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Tuesday, August 4, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, August 4, 2015

Just a short, but incredibly exciting 5 years ago, I was writing my fourth patient experience blog in what has become a monthly occurrence. In that blog I introduced the definition of patient experience created by early contributors to The Beryl Institute community. In those first months of our work we were focused on reinforcing some fundamental ideas and values that have remained at the core of our work at the Institute since that summer we got underway.

In introducing the definition we offered,

"A positive patient experience is created by partnering with patients and their support network (i.e., families or caregivers) to anticipate needs and exceed expectations, recognize the individuality of each patient as a decision maker, form a caring, compassionate and lasting relationship.”

From those very roots we have operated, not from the perspective of providers only, or espoused a singular model or organizational perspective. Rather, we have comfortably left that to those with personal or business interests in what they saw and see as the potential of the patient experience marketplace. Our belief was and remains that the ability to improve the patient experience at a global level is grounded in collaboration and partnership, a welcoming of all perspectives and encouraging open sharing of ideas across segments of healthcare, organizational boundaries and even national borders. This philosophy has led to the largest community of practice dedicated to patient experience improvement, now almost 35,000 people strong representing almost 50 countries around the globe.

The significance here is that from the very beginning of our work we have operated from the mindset that patients and families are partners in the overall experience conversation, or simply stated, patients must be included. I offered this perspective as recently as my Hospital Impact Blog last week, but perhaps more importantly have lived it through our work as we have continued to learn and grow as a community. These efforts have been realized through the inclusion of patient and family voice on our boards from the outset, in our establishment of our Global Patient and Family Advisory Council (GPFAC) and the cutting edge work they continue to push us to explore (including some exciting news to be announced later this month), and they have been seen in our provision of learning and content from webinars and papers, to Patient Experience Conference itself, which has included patient and family voice on stage, in breakouts and in participation for the past few years.

It is for these reasons and grounded in our founding values that we are excited to also reinforce our commitment to the formal efforts around having patients included in healthcare gatherings. The phrase "nothing about me without me” is not new to healthcare, but what is emerging is a more critical intent on ensuring the consumer voice is engaged and included in the broader healthcare conversation – not simply around individual episodes of care, but in the very discussion of policy, procedures and processes that impact all engaging in healthcare globally.

For this reason, "patients included”, is much more than a nice phrase, it is our commitment and should be the commitment of so many other organizations espousing to include or more significantly represent the patient and family voice in healthcare. As a community comprised of all voices, we believed it was important to reinforce this important point.

The "patients included” movement was inspired by an experience and subsequent blog authored by a virtual colleague and thoughtful healthcare leader Lucien Engelen. He offers in recounting the roots of this effort, "When it was my turn to deliver my keynote, I asked the audience ‘How many patients are present here?’ Not one, it appeared. That there should be so much talk about what patients need and want without them being present prompted me to take action.”

The action resulted in the "Patients Included” movement and most recently a full charter guiding a true patients included effort around healthcare events. The charter, created by the voices of patients, caregivers and healthcare leaders in Spring 2015, calls on healthcare events to commit to the following:

  1. Patients or caregivers with experience relevant to the conference’s central theme actively participate in the design and planning of the event, including the selection of themes, topics and speakers.
  2. Patients or caregivers with experience of the issues addressed by the event participate in its delivery, and appear in its physical audience.
    • The Beryl Institute Patient Experience Conference 2016 keynote speakers includes patient and family voice and perspective. In addition, when sessions are selected late August, they will also reflect patient and family representation.
  3. Travel and accommodation expenses for patients or carers participating in the advertised programme are paid in full, in advance. Scholarships are provided by the conference organisers to allow patients or carers affected by the relevant issues to attend as delegates.
    • The Beryl Institute Patient Experience Conference 2016 offers patient and family scholarships to conference participants to support engaging more patients and family members in the overall patient experience conversation. In addition, patient and family voice throughout our conference keynote speakers are fully covered for fees, travel and accommodation.
  4. The disability requirements of participants are accommodated. All applicable sessions, breakouts, ancillary meetings, and other programme elements are open to patient delegates.
    • The Beryl Institute Patient Experience Conference 2016 will accommodate all disability requirements of conference participants for all parts of the program elements.
  5. Access for virtual participants is facilitated, with free streaming video provided online wherever possible.
    • The Beryl Institute Patient Experience Conference 2016 will provide conference access and updates to virtual participants through social media and the #PX2016 hashtag. Conference participants actively engage online via social media and conference presentations are made available to participants after the event.

While not every organization may be able to accommodate these commitments due to constraints or other considerations, they reinforce a powerful statement on what including all voices and providing the access to do so truly means. At The Beryl Institute, we ourselves have met these very commitments for our own Patient Experience Conference. Patients and families contribute to program development and review and are critical voices on stage and in breakouts. Scholarships, though modest are provided and accessibility, one of our core operating values, is reinforced, including virtual access to the extent possible via social media and other means.

We do this for more than it being the right thing to do. As a community of practice committed to experience improvement, we also believe that which we espouse and encourage in organizations behavior, we must be willing to do and model ourselves.

Patients included is more than a nice slogan or a feel good effort, it is a fundamental premise to executing on the best in patient experience efforts in healthcare today. We welcome the opportunity as we continue to grow to ensure we maintain this perspective and challenge and encourage the patient experience community and the broader healthcare community to take note. Patient and family voice matters in our ability to provide the best in outcomes, it has and always will.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  caregivers  community of practice  defining patient experience  patient and family  patient and family advisory council  patient experience 

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