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The Essence of Human Experience in the Face of COVID-19

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, PhD, CPXP, Monday, April 13, 2020

I have started almost every email, conversation, webinar or call in the last few weeks with a simple wish that you, your families and colleagues are safe and well. Each morning as I hear my two boys rustle themselves awake, I am reminded of how precious our lives are, how important the people around us remain and how every moment we have is one to appreciate for its essence and to contribute to making better with our every breath.

 

This is no different than in our shared efforts to address COVID-19 as a community, to stand with each other during this crisis and to sustain and ensure that a focus on human experience is not lost in these critical times. It was just 10 years ago to this day – April 14 – that I first stood in front of a room of people to publicly share what my dream for The Beryl Institute was. I believed the opportunity that we were called to address and the possibility I saw in our coming together was not to simply espouse certain ideas, but rather to foster connection, to ignite innovation, to catalyze connection and to elevate a conversation that has only grown at the heart of healthcare over the last decade.

 

My hope for our community then is being realized now, as I called on us at the time to establish a destination for shared information and research and an incubator of new ideas and practices that positively impact the patient experience. What we have become together is much more now, as we are truly a global community of practice committed to elevating the human experience in healthcare.

 

This journey led us to this moment where we reinforce that our efforts have never been about the Institute, but rather they have been about what the Institute represents in the voices of those who are served by healthcare and those who serve in healthcare every day. That is the power of community, for the voices right now spending tireless hours to care for those in the most dire of times are doing so moved by something bigger and knowing there are so many more standing behind them with hope, with commitment, with shared purpose and with a belief that together we can and will move through this crisis.

 

At a time when days feel like weeks where people are either charging in to care for others on the front lines, supporting it from afar, showing up to provide essential services in so many needed industries such as food stores and pharmacies or by doing their part by staying home to flatten the curve, teaching their children or providing care at home, this crisis has called on all to contribute, and it will take all of us to succeed. That premise of all of us together is fundamental to the essence of human experience that brings us all together in our growing community with the Institute. Just last week alone we saw over 1000 people engage across webinars, phone calls or virtually online to share and support one another. Those voices represented thousands more in their own organizations, each touching the lives of thousands more in the communities they serve. That is the powerful and positive ripple effect we are creating together! And why the human experience is not something to lose in this moment in our history.

 

As you follow the stories of challenge and success, of loss and hope, of overcoming odds and succumbing to this disease, in all of this what we have done and continue to do as a community is ensure the humanity at the heart of healthcare burns brighter than ever. I think at the start of this crisis there was concern that the dire needs and actions required would squelch out the embers of humanity at our core, but in all we have seen in acknowledgement and success, compassion and clinical excellence, sacrifice and unwavering commitment to fellow humans by so many, the idea I will forever reinforce – that in healthcare we are human beings caring for human beings – has only seemed to grow stronger.

 

At the same time, we are reminded of the vigilance this crisis will take. If we pull up on the reigns of our essential efforts too soon, we will find ourselves slowing before the finish. And I believe that as we look at this crisis, we will never truly get beyond it. This is not a pessimistic tone, but rather one grounded in optimism for all we will have and will continue to learn. I do not believe we will have a post-COVID era, or even a new “normal.” Nothing about this is, or will be, normal…but rather, we will have a NEW EXISTENCE where much of what we espoused and worked so hard to put in place before this crisis will remain essential. At the same time, cracks have been revealed and systemic weaknesses highlighted for healthcare globally, many which we subtly or in passing have acknowledged, some with more extensive efforts to address underway, but in the midst of this crisis have become ever more apparent.

 

In our latest episode of the To Care is Human Podcast released this week, I had the chance to speak with Dr. Shantanu Agrawal, President & CEO of the National Quality Forum. In our conversation, as in many I have had with leaders and community members in the last few weeks, we discussed the revelations of this crisis beyond the challenges of readiness or even the lack of “systemness” in our regional, national and global healthcare system, to that of the inequity that is revealed in healthcare itself. This crisis has revealed powerful things about us societally as well, not just about those we serve in healthcare but even the everyday heroes in our midst who don scrubs or coveralls, aprons or gowns to support the very foundation on which healthcare operates. We will be called as a result of this crisis to tackle those issues in ways we have yet had the muscle to do.

 

At the same time, healthcare’s self-perceptions on the dangers found in assessing risk versus acting with agility and speed has been challenged, as we have seen technology application rapidly deployed, protocols overturned or rewritten, inflexible structures cracked and quickly rebuilt and more. All of what we are learning in the face of the real suffering and sadness in this crisis is also what responsibilities we have to change and address our own opportunities as a healthcare system globally. These bigger issues will be part of the larger conversation on new existence, but we too cannot get too far ahead as we have people now living life’s final moments, while others are working feverishly to save those lives.

 

At the heart of the actions and efforts of so many lie what turns us back to the humanness of healthcare. Yes, the clinical excellence at healthcare’s roots will ensure we save lives, but the efforts we are seeing to elevate the human experience now will ensure we honor those lives through and beyond this crisis as well. While we struggle with the realities of bed space, access to personal protective equipment, ventilators, adequate testing or other needed technologies, we too have seen humanity elevated in ways we knew existed and will remain forever possible.

 

  • Even in the face of limited visitation policies, organizations are finding technology and other means to connect people to one another, to enable those in isolation to feel less alone and provide a face and voice of comfort, even if not in person, at the end of life. We are working more to ensure we connect as people…that is the essence of human experience.
  • We are seeing the human spirit personified in the efforts of so many on the front lines of care hidden behind masks and screens putting a picture of themselves with a smile and even a note or two about who they are as a person on the front of their gown. We are working to break down barriers and structures to the people we are…that is the essence of human experience.
  • Caring for healthcare teams has been elevated to new heights from social-emotional needs of having support lines and respite rooms to ensuring basic needs are met in providing internally- developed markets to provide for food and sundry needs for those focused on healing others. The breadth of support for those who serve has never been so evident and tangible,  even in the face of some of the challenges those providing care still face…this recognition and effort too is the essence of human experience.
  • While most charging into the trenches of this crisis, from doctors and nurses to environmental service and food service workers and so many others, would not call themselves heroes, the recognition of their sacrifice in the face of potential danger is real. This is the same for all providing essential services in grocery stores or pharmacies, transporting goods or delivering food. These individuals are the synapses of a physically distanced society and the bond on which it will be connected once again. We too see an outpouring of appreciation and acknowledgement from the blaring sirens of fire and police departments, to the flashing car lights, street signs and chalk art appearing outside hospitals and care centers, simply to say thank you. These gestures remind us that what binds us is and must remain stronger than what divides us…that is the essence of human experience.

 

These are just some examples of what people have stepped up to do at this time, but we are reminded again and again in times of crisis that our most important resource and our greatest source of hope is one another. It is in our capacity to face what is in front of us, both for its ugly realities and its moving successes, that make humanity and, yes, the humanity in healthcare so powerful. This is not to downplay the seriousness of what we are fighting as human beings, but rather to recognize as human beings our motivation to fight comes from our ability to overcome challenge, to acknowledge and celebrate success, to see hope in darkness. That is where community comes in and why community is so important, and that is why we are and will always be stronger together!

 

For many, a tough stretch continues over the next few weeks and for some small cracks of relief may even be visible. With that all we have created together in our web of knowledge and support is powerful, broad and unbreakable. Know that no one stands alone, and this global community stands behind and with you in what lies ahead. I encourage you to review what the community has created together to support one another at this time in the Institute’s COVID-19 Resource Center. That is how and why I know our new existence will be a place that honors the tragedy, sacrifice and sorrow of this time, but has roots in our strength, in our collective innovation and in our shared passion and purpose.

 

The human experience we have all committed ourselves to has never been more real, more critical or more needed. And from all we have done and will do together in ensuring we overcome this crisis, I think we can all stand reassured that our commitment to the human experience will not be going anywhere any time soon. That is the essence of human experience.

 

Please stay healthy and well and thanks for all you do…it will truly take all of us…together.

 

Jason A. Wolf, PhD, CPXP
President & CEO
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  community  covid-19  crisis  human experience  human spirit  personal protective equipment  podcast  social-emotional needs 

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From "How are WE doing?" to "How are YOU doing?": A New Perspective for Experience Measurement

Posted By Jason Wolf, Sunday, December 15, 2019
Updated: Sunday, December 15, 2019

In our first December blog in 2010 as we launched The Beryl Institute as a global community, I shared a quote from Maya Angelou. It read:

"There is no greater burden than carrying an untold story."

That idea has been essential to our journey at the Institute and a seed of the evolution of the experience movement itself. Every patient, family member or caregiver we serve in healthcare, every individual who wakes up each day to work in healthcare and every person who is impacted in the communities we serve in healthcare ALL have a story to share. This idea, this reality, is universal. We all have untold stories inside us to share.

I believe we have together pushed the conversation in healthcare to see people we care for not simply as a room number or a diagnosis on a chart, but as human beings with needs and wants, hopes and dreams, all rooted in their own story. At the same time, from the lenses of those that experience healthcare, we have heard loud and clear, and have seen reinforced in data from our own research, that the number one request from their healthcare experience is “listen to me”.1  When we take a moment to listen to those we serve in healthcare and those who serve in healthcare, we reveal a rich and powerful tapestry of our very humanity. When we create the space for stories to be told and ensure needs and desires are revealed, we create new and more powerful paths on which we can impact the human experience overall.

It was this realization that sparked a powerful idea at the heart of Michael Barry and Susan Edgman Levitan’s piece in The New England Journal of Medicine on shared decision making.2 In their perspective, they offered we must move from simply engaging people on “What is the matter?” to “What matters to you?” as an essential element of providing the best quality care. That very question “what matters” begins to crack open the doors hiding the untold stories people carry. It could be about the fears they personally carry, about the family they love and are worried they might leave behind, about the way a room is lit, to the name they are called. These are all driven by the stories of our lives as human beings.

And as I have long suggested, in healthcare we are simply human beings caring for human beings and therefore must acknowledge that these realities for people, whether revealed by asking or left hidden, will have an impact on how people are cared for and ultimately the outcomes they achieve. Simply stated, we cannot take the human out of healthcare, and so healthcare is ultimately built upon and must act within a patchwork of human experiences in our desire to provide safe, quality, reliable, consistent, service-focused and accessible care.

But there is also more to the story, for as “what matters to you” has grown into a global movement grounded in the clinical encounter of healthcare, the conversation on human experience in healthcare pushes us to move even farther. As the global community of practice committed to elevating the human experience in healthcare, we realized at The Beryl Institute that the idea of measuring experience itself could and must be informed by this very idea. When we look at the traditional way in which we have asked for feedback in healthcare or in most industries for that matter, we have tended to ask “How are WE doing?”. Questions we pose to our patients, our customers or our consumers are asking them to tell us about us. But where in these inquiries do we ask about them and their needs? Where do we take the step to help them reveal their untold story and better understand how we can help them in addressing those needs?

That very question had us think about the powerful opportunity to ask less about “How are WE doing?” to more about “How are YOU doing?”. Have you felt that spark in a conversation when someone asks you that question? It is an opening, an opportunity, an appreciation that you have a thought, an idea, a need, and yes, a story to tell.

When we flip the question to “How are you doing?”, we can then uncover what people need, what they want and what matters to them more broadly. And in doing so, we can also ask about our ability as healthcare organizations to meet those needs. When we ask “How are you doing?”, we invite a different perspective on how people see things, as Gerteis, Edgman-Levitan, Daley and Delblanco wrote in 1993,3 “through their eyes.” That is the opportunity we believe we have in measuring experience overall, and, yes, we believe in understanding your needs in The Beryl Institute’s global community as well.

The opportunity is now to find ways in which we ask others to rate us not only on how we did for them or if they would recommend us, to more directly what they need as our patients, customers and consumers and how well we met those needs. How will you ask those questions in your own organizations to uncover and address the needs of those you serve? What steps can and will we take to uncover the untold story?

At the Institute, we believe we can do this by flipping the question today as we engage the over 50,000 people in our community and beyond in a new type of inquiry. We will now ask “How are YOU doing?” and based on your answer, we will also inquire “What do you need from us?”. Finally, we will ask what we are doing and what we can do better to help meet those needs. It comes back to the idea that when we ask people about ourselves, it becomes about us; but when we ask others about themselves, it becomes about them. It is about their story and the insights shared, and it actually provides a more powerful window into what we can all be doing to support one another in what we do, what we offer, and how we work together.

It is not an easy switch for organizations to move from asking people ”How are WE doing?” to “How are YOU doing?”. While it is reaffirming and helpful, I think we can agree the first question  is limited and may miss the biggest opportunity of all. When we ask people “How are YOU doing?” there is acknowledgement for the un-acknowledged, there is space for discovery and there is the opportunity for connection and for the ability to meeting one another where we stand as human beings in healthcare and beyond.

In a world where the concerns of human discourse have turned sour across the continents and distance has been created between people versus bridges being built, we must accept this is our current reality. Perhaps in our willingness to ask others about themselves, we can begin to tighten the seams of humanity once again. When we each in our own way try to express our interest in others, and when we change the way in how we ask about the experiences of others, we all take one step closer to the power of the human experience that we look to foster every day in healthcare. We each can help catalyze this type of connection. My ask of all of us is that we work to do so. Our hope here at the Institute is to change how we ask you, our community, about your needs and to help start this subtle but significant shift. To that effort, we invite each of you to take a few minutes in the coming days via our inquiry to tell us how YOU are doing.

There IS no greater burden than an untold story. And there is NO greater means to connect and to better serve by working to share those stories. Here is to all the stories we will both share and create together in this new year and beyond.


Jason A. Wolf, PhD, CPXP

President & CEO
The Beryl Institute

 

1.     Wolf JA. Consumer Perspectives on Patient Experience 2018. The Beryl Institute; 2018.

2.     Barry MJ, Edgman-Levitan S. Shared Decision Making — The Pinnacle of Patient-Centered Care. New England Journal of Medicine. 2012;366(9):780-781. doi:10.1056/nejmp1109283.

3.     Gerteis M, Edgman-Levitan S, Daley J, Delbanco T. Through the patient’s eyes. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1993.

Tags:  accountability  body of knowledge  collaboration  community  community of practice  Continuum of Care  engagement  Field of Patient Experience  global healthcare  Human Experience  improving patient experience  Interactions  Leadership  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  patient experience community  thought leadership  voice 

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5 Ways to Impact Your Patient Experience Success in 2019

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Monday, January 7, 2019
Updated: Monday, January 7, 2019

Embarking on a New Year tends to bring forth much reflection and anticipation. While 2018 was often shadowed by political tensions and shifting pressures on our healthcare systems globally, it was also a year of significant reinforcement of the value and purpose of the patient experience movement. 

We introduced two new research studies at The Beryl Institute in 2018, both intended to help validate and focus the patient experience field. A study on Consumer Perspectives on Patient Experience confirmed that 91% of consumers believe patient experience is extremely or very important and will be significant to the healthcare decisions they will make. And most recently, we published To Care is Human, exploring the factors influencing experience in healthcare today and reinforcing the relational nature where healthcare is grounded in human beings caring for human beings. 

As we begin 2019, I believe the patient experience movement is better prepared than ever to accelerate its efforts. And as your organization embarks on the new year, I encourage you to consider a few suggestions that have potential to positively impact your success:

  • Evaluate Your Strengths and Opportunities – As you reflect on the direction your PX journey took in the past year and plan for future success, I encourage you to take time to examine where your organization excels and where you have opportunities to grow. The Beryl Institute’s Experience Framework identifies the strategic areas through which any experience endeavor should be framed, provides a means to evaluate where you are excelling or may have opportunities for improvement and offers a practical application to align knowledge, resources and solutions. If you find there are areas of great strength for your organization, let us know so we can share your successes with the community. And if you identify potential opportunities in your journey, contact us and we’ll help you navigate the many resources available in the Institute’s library of content. To further assist the overall community, we’ll also begin highlighting a new strategic lens each month, offering new webinars and other programming around that lens and curating a selection of resources to help you amplify your efforts in that area.

  • Enhance Your Organization's Foundation in Patient Experience – When building a culture of patient experience excellence, it is essential to establish a foundation where all team members clearly understand what patient experience is, what it means to them and how they can positively impact experience excellence. Consider ways in which you can share patient experience knowledge on the front lines of care to positively impact experience outcomes. Last year the Institute introduced PX 101, a community-inspired and developed resource for use in orientation programs and other staff education. While not intended to be used in isolation or as a stand-alone resource, PX 101 can enhance your journey by distilling the resources and knowledge available via the Institute into practical, transferable learning to support your larger patient experience training strategy. 

  • Celebrate Your Patient Experience Efforts – Wherever you are in your journey, it’s important to recognize successes and commitment. Not only does this offer a chance to celebrate great work, it also provides an opportunity to reinforce the significance and impact of your efforts. Start planning now for Patient Experience Week 2019: April 22 - April 26. Patient Experience Week is an annual event to celebrate healthcare staff impacting patient experience. Inspired by members of the Institute, it provides a focused time to celebrate accomplishments, create enthusiasm and honor the people who impact patient experience everyday. 

While I believe the suggestions above can have great impact on your organization’s patient experience focus, I encourage you to be just as thoughtful in developing your own growth plan for the new year. We likely all have personal resolutions around health, fitness, finances, etc., but it’s important to also consider ways we can grow professionally as patient experience leaders. Whether you’re looking to make a career move in 2019 or build knowledge and value in your current role, consider these key steps to impact your success: 

  • Expand Your Patient Experience Network – One of the greatest benefits cited by members of The Beryl Institute is the power of the community – the ability to network, share and learn with others passionate about improving experience. Make a commitment now to attend Patient Experience Conference 2019 to be held April 3-5 at the Hyatt Regency Dallas. It’s the largest independent, non-provider or vendor hosted event bringing together the collective voices of healthcare professionals across the globe to expand the dialogue on improving patient experience, and you’re sure to leave with new information, inspiration and connections. 

  • Distinguish Yourself as an Expert in Patient Experience Performance – The best way to impact your professional success is to ensure you have the knowledge and tools necessary to succeed in today's healthcare environment. Through PX Body of Knowledge courses, The Beryl Institute offers certificate programs in Patient Experience Leadership and Patient Advocacy. With over 440 certificate program recipients to date, the PX Body of Knowledge frames the field of patient experience, defines its core ideas and provides a clear foundation of knowledge that supports the consistent and continuous development of current and future leaders in the field. Also consider earning your formal certification as a Certified Patient Experience Professional (CPXP) which is awarded through successful completion of the CPXP examination, offered through our sister organization, Patient Experience Institute. CPXP Prep Course workshops are available through The Beryl Institute to help you prepare.
At the Institute, our 2019 commitment to you is that we will continue seeking ways to support and elevate your efforts through offering the most relevant research, resources and connections – and by helping you to easily navigate these offerings. We have tremendous respect and gratitude for the work happening globally each day to improve experiences for patients, families and caregivers, and we will continue to provide a place for our community to share, learn, celebrate and inspire together.

If you have specific needs we can assist with as you embark on your 2019 organizational or personal PX journey, please let us know. We’re here to help!

Stacy Palmer, CPXP
Senior Vice President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  accountability  body of knowledge  celebration  collaboration  community  community of practice  connection  culture  Field of Patient Experience  global healthcare  healthcare  Human Experience  improving patient experience  Leadership  member benefit  member value  movement  Patient Experience  patient experience community  patient experience week 

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Increasing the Value of The Beryl Institute Membership

Posted By Denise R. Weathers, Thursday, March 8, 2018
Updated: Thursday, March 8, 2018

For years, The Beryl Institute has offered the community a growing library of resources to support you in leading a positive patient experience effort for your organization. Over the past year, the Institute has experienced some major accomplishments highlighted in our 2017 Year In Review. As we continue the commitment to improving the human experience by offering value-added resources and services, the need for our members become ever so important. The question has become – how can The Beryl Institute best serve its members and the patient experience community?

Through our Annual Member Experience Survey distributed in December 2017, you helped us address this question by providing your much-deserved feedback. To highlight a few observations, we asked what you thought of the services that are being offered by the Institute. Similar to previous survey results, the top six most-valued and accessed member benefits are Publications, such as White Papers and Research Reports, Webinars, E- Newsletters (PX Monthly and PX Newslink), Learning Bites, PX Connect, the latest member benefit and the PX Conference.

Although the above-mentioned resources were rated as the most-valued resources, the one word that was consistent throughout the survey feedback and placed an even wider smile on our faces was “Community.” Relationships are considered by many to be the most important and satisfying aspect of life, and your partnership with The Beryl Institute provides you with a diverse global community of physicians, nurses, patient experience leaders, patient and family advisors, consultants, etc., in various healthcare settings, coming together to support one common goal…to improve the patient and human experience in healthcare. Community matters in patient experience and we must ensure it does for the power of the collection of voices in our movement and in the work, it calls us to do every day.

Community speaks to the heart of who we are and to the resources and opportunities we develop for you to engage in for learning, the collection and dissemination of ideas and the connection among peers such as your ability to connect in the recent addition of the online member community, PX Connect, and by attending the 2018 PX Conference, coming up next month April 16-18 at the Hyatt Regency Chicago.

The Power of community has also been elevated with the recent emergence of the PX Policy Forum and the newly formed Nurse Executive Council. To further increase the value of your membership, the Institute has or is taking steps to improve your member experience by providing:

 

Enhanced offerings for professional development and learning exploring how the Institute can elevate the partner organizations and speakers who present at its professional development learning areas such as webinars, PX Conference, Regional Roundtables and PX Grand Rounds; engaging and leveraging discussions in the online patient experience member community, PX Connect, to develop untapped content and resources; and, organizing content collaboration targets for specific areas we recognize may have some gaps such as Ambulatory Care, Physician Office Setting and Long-Term Care, to name a few.

 

 Increased member benefit awareness with enhanced communications highlighting targeted member benefits such as: Career Center, expanded volunteer opportunities and PX Connect, and include Patient Experience Continuing Education (PXE) credit offerings through most of the professional development and learning programs, pending approval.

 

Innovation, research and global presence by adding an Experience Innovation position to expand the Institute’s global landscape of groundbreaking advancements in the PX evolution.


It is our commitment to be that organization…that patient experience community that identifies and address your needs more effectively and one that provides an optimal suite of patient experience resources, products and services at the most affordable investment and value.

The Beryl Institute staff are here to serve you. We hope the continued focus on improving the resources, products and services display our commitment and our drive to showcase and support you and your organization on your patient experience journey.

Do you have ideas on how we could continue to increase the value of The Beryl Institute membership? Email me at denise.weathers@theberylinstitute.org with your ideas and suggestions.

 

Denise R. Weathers
Vice President, Membership
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  commitment  Community  community of practice  member benefit  member survey  member value  px connect 

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Announcing PX Connect: A New Member-Powered Virtual Patient Experience Community is Coming

Posted By Denise R. Weathers, Wednesday, September 20, 2017

The idea of community aligns strongly with the definition of patient experience that asserts patient experience across the entire continuum of care. This means to provide a true experience, you must think well beyond the physical nature of your facilities or practices to recognize the experience resides in the network of people that surround and are connected to your organization, both near and far. This is at its heart, the essence of experience. The experience you provide is a community story and one you must be willing to acknowledge, address and oftentimes, share.

The essence of patient experience thrives in much bigger ideas of community, which is why we have worked effortlessly in creating a true community of practice in The Beryl Institute itself. We recognize, through observation of the listserv discussions and feedback from member surveys, our members are seeking the option to engage with peers in a more personalized manner according to specific special interests, as well as an enhanced organized, streamlined way to discover, share and connect. As the Institute continues to grow and evolve, so does the communication and engagement needs of its patient experience member community. 

We listened and PX Connect, the Institute’s newest enhanced virtual patient experience community benefit, is coming soon, replacing the current PX Listservs.  Exclusively for members, this powerful virtual community will enhance the ways you engage, share and learn with the Institute’s patient experience community around the world. It has been designed with a simple focus: to share special-interest knowledge and resources through connection with your peers and other healthcare organizations focused on patient experience efforts to foster the creation of strong national and global networks.

The PX Connect community, will allow members to:

  • Easily search for content, viewing calendars of events and deadlines.
  • Share challenges and best practices in real-time.
  • Get direct access to current information and timely news. Search and contribute to the powerful Library of patient experience resource models and samples designed to generate ideas and save your peers and you time from reinventing the wheel.
  • Stay connected with participating Patient Experience Conference attendees and Learning and Professional Development course classmates.
  • Engage with committee members real-time.
  • View community content on any screen size or mobile device.
  • Receive special recognition for contributions to the PX Connect Community.
  • Create an instant infrastructure for patient experience communication across systems enabling their staff, key stakeholders, patients and family members to virtually engage, network and share knowledge through a private online community platform (Exclusive to Organizational Members).
  • And more!

The PX Connect community will support your patient experience resource solution needs—and to celebrate and share in your patient experience victories. The community will also provide you with a virtual high-five and a shared laugh.

Thank you for your continued support of the Institute. Membership with the Institute shows that your organization is committed to creating market distinction by supporting a culture where staff at all levels have access to patient experience resources, show their understanding that patient experience is an integration of quality, safety and service and display a commitment to provide the best in outcomes for those in our care.

If you have any questions about your membership, or wish to have your organization join our patient experience community, please feel free to contact me at denise.weathers@theberylinstitute.org.

 

Denise R. Weathers
Vice President, Membership
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  community  connection  member benefit  member value  membership  networking  px connect 

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At the Heart of Patient Experience is Caring for Those Who Care: A Call to Action for Those in Need

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, PhD, CPXP, Thursday, September 7, 2017

For the last two weeks, I have had the opportunity to visit two amazing healthcare institutions in São Paulo, Brazil – Hospital Sírio Libanêse and Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein – and meet healthcare leaders from across Latin America committed to improving patient experience. While there I had the unique experience of watching the approach of and resulting impact of Hurricane Harvey on Texas and Louisiana from outside the United States. As was evident in every report, the challenge this storm posed for the communities it impacted, their infrastructure and their healthcare organizations placed a significant strain on the system and created great need.

As we have seen in patient experience efforts around the globe, a central priority has emerged, one focused on taking care of not just those we serve in healthcare, but the people serving as well. This idea of caring for our team and staff in healthcare, of ensuring the engagement and care of our employees, was in fact the fastest growing point of focus in supporting patient experience success in The State of Patient Experience 2017. It is clear that taking care of those who give of themselves in healthcare is something we cannot and should not take lightly. This is no more relevant than at this moment in cities such as Houston, TX in the aftermath of Harvey (and now for those in the path of Hurricane Irma).

For all that healthcare organizations have done to support the needs of their communities impacted by Harvey, they too have been literally underwater. With many instances of organizations with disrupted and/or discontinued services, these organizations have stretched their capacity to care for the communities they serve. Yet, what we must realize is that those providing care are not only caregivers, they are the affected themselves. They too may be displaced by flooding or damage, their families impacted and their lives disrupted, yet they have remained steadfast in their efforts to care for those in need.

It is in times like this where the need to care for those who provide care is impossible to miss. It also reinforces that we cannot and should not overlook this need any day in which we are looking to provide the best in care for our communities, for the best in care starts with taking care of our own people. And this critical time calls on not just the organizations impacted to step up, but truly all of us with the means and/or desire to help to do the same.

Our colleagues at ACHE last week called for the support of an effort at the Texas Hospital Association, which has established the THA Hospital Employee Assistance Fund to help hospital employees who experienced significant property loss or damage due to Hurricane Harvey. There are also still significant needs for all those impacted by this event that can be supported via the American Red Cross and numerous other charitable opportunities.

These needs and the opportunities to help are now being elevated by the latest storm, Irma. With her eye already impacting many and set at one of the busiest hubs of healthcare activity in the United States, the need to care for one another and our call to take care of others is only further reinforced. This is not a time to sit idly by, but rather recognize that whether in the path of a literal storm or in the dynamic and chaotic environment that healthcare globally presents, we must never overlook the opportunity to care for those who care.

In the industry of caring for others that healthcare represents and the profession of patient experience that is emerging at its core, we must not forget that our primary means of delivering on our purpose, promise and commitments is through the very people who give of themselves every day to care for others. It is in times like this that we all must step up to care for and support them.

I invite you to join us in this effort, to support the affected members of our community and all those in need. For in healthcare, where we are human beings caring for human beings, and with an unwavering commitment to the human experience in healthcare (and beyond), we are called to act and help those in our communities who need us. There may be no greater purpose in our work, and no greater effort in ensuring we maintain the best in experience for all we care for and serve. Thank you for joining us in this effort as our deepest thoughts and warmest wishes go to all impacted by Harvey and those preparing for the arrival of Irma.

The following links will allow you to learn more about and contribute to the following causes and I invite you to share other means of support for these efforts via the comments section below:

THA Hospital Employee Assistance Fund

 American Red Cross

 

Jason A. Wolf, PhD, CPXP 
President 
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  community  compassion  compassionate care  employee engagement  houston  hurricane harvey  hurricane relief 

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The Spirit of the PX Movement – Sharing, Learning and Improving Together

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Monday, December 12, 2016
Updated: Monday, December 12, 2016

After six years as a membership community focused on improving patient experience, we continue to be amazed and inspired by the generosity of our members and guests committed to this movement. The spirit of this work is illustrated perfectly by the willingness to share, learn and grow together.

Just last week we released a great example of this in action through the white paper, Guiding Principles for Patient Experience Excellence. We’re careful to always acknowledge there is no one recipe for improving patient experience, but we have identified eight themes consistent in organizations who have found success in this work. The paper shares those principles, reflects on why each is a critical consideration and, perhaps most importantly, highlights specific examples from 15 organizations who excel in one or more of these areas.

As in all the work shared through the Institute, the examples represent only a sample of the many approaches that could be tied to each principle. They are offered to spark thinking in ways others can move from concept to action. It’s the willingness of these organizations to share their successes that fuels that thinking for others.

The gifting of knowledge and experiences has helped to build the field of patient experience and establishes both credibility and accountability for our efforts. This year our sister organization, Patient Experience Institute, recognized the first three classes of Certified Patient Experience Professionals (CPXPs), an incredible statement and stride for the movement. We continue to see this work validated and see our community eager to spread the word on the importance of addressing experience excellence and sharing successes and challenges encountered along the way.

We wholeheartedly offer thanks to every individual and organization who contributed to this work over the past year. Thank you for every case study shared, On the Road visit or regional roundtable hosted, webinar or conference session presented, ListServ email sent, topic call or connection call attended and learning bite delivered. It’s through these and other collective efforts that we can truly shape this movement and positively impact the experiences of patients, families and caregivers.

Interested in learning more about how you can personally contribute to the community in 2017? Visit http://www.theberylinstitute.org/?page=CONNECTIONIDEAS.

 

Stacy Palmer, CPXP
Senior Vice President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  accountability  collaboration  community  community of practice  engagement  Field of Patient Experience  healthcare  improving patient experience  networking  patient experience  thought leadership 

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Supporting the Expanding Field of Patient Experience

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Thursday, June 9, 2016
Updated: Thursday, June 9, 2016

This week we opened the call for submissions for Patient Experience Conference 2017. It will mark the seventh official year for this event, the annual gathering bringing together the collective voices of healthcare professionals and patients/families across the globe to convene, engage in and expand the dialogue on improving patient experience. 

Each year we’ve seen significant increases is conference participation, with almost 1,000 people gathering in Dallas this past April to share, learn and network with one another. Similarly The Beryl Institute community itself continues to grow, now made up of over 45,000 members and guests from 55 countries. We believe this growth signifies the expansion of the patient experience movement. Leaders are realizing a focus on experience is a necessity for survival in the ever-changing healthcare environment.

We’ve watched the field develop with some organizations now appointing Chief Experience Officers to guide efforts and strategy. Patient Experience Institute, a sister organization of The Beryl Institute, has established a formal designation for Certified Patient Experience Professionals – and over 140 organizations now have one or more CPXPs on staff. Hundreds of individuals are expanding their professional development through the PX Body of Knowledge certificate programs. And Patient Experience Week was established to celebrate those who positively impact experience every day. 

Without a doubt, the field of patient experience is expanding.

This expansion continues to change the dynamics of The Beryl Institute Community. When we began as a membership organization in late 2010, most of our members were just getting started on their patient experience journeys. They were incredibly willing to share the successes and struggles along the way – which led to the abundance of community-developed content that exists and continues to grow today.

While we’ll always offer resources, support and encouragement to those beginning their efforts, we must continue to elevate the conversation to also support those further along on their journeys. Many of you are now looking to the community for information on how you can take things to the next level. How do you sustain your programs? What can you do to develop deeper engagement opportunities with patients and family members? How can you bring down silos that exist within your organization? How do you integrate social media into experience efforts?

The expansion of the field and our commitment to provide the breadth and levels of content needed to support the community led us to a significant change in the conference call for submissions process for 2017. As you complete the submission form for a standard breakout, mini session or poster – and we invite you to consider doing so – you’ll be asked to identify the development stage for your content, specifically your submission is ideal for individuals with:

  • Minimal knowledge and experience. Looking for some basic information, key principles and "how to’s” on the subject.
  • Working knowledge and some proven experience. Looking for breath or depth in the subject, how to sustain and engage others and/or dealing with resistance to change on the subject. 
  • Authoritative knowledge and proven success. Looking for advanced knowledge and examples to evolve their understanding and practice on the subject. 

This is the scale our Learning and Professional Development team considers regularly as they develop content for our webinars, topic calls and other resources, and we're excited to now apply this process to Patient Experience Conference. This information will guide our volunteer reviewers and conference planning committee to develop a well-balanced program that meets the needs of participants at all levels. We’ll identify sessions as beginning, intermediate or advanced so you can make the most-informed choices on what sessions you will attend to customize your learning experience. 

It’s important to acknowledge, however, that levels of learning can be both subjective and cyclical. Organizations who once excelled at certain facets of patient experience may find themselves slipping in that area over time and in need of a basic refresher. And organizations just beginning a patient experience journey might have certain areas in which they already perform well ahead of the curve. There will always be a need to support all levels of development and we are committed to sharing that breadth of resources.  We thank you in advance for your contributions to the community. Sharing your story and knowledge truly represents the core idea that we are ALL the Patient Experience!


Stacy Palmer
Vice President, Strategy and Member Experience 
The Beryl Institute
 

Tags:  collaboration  commitment  community  community of practice  engagement  Field of Patient Experience  global healthcare  healthcare  improving patient experience  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  service excellence 

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Reflecting on the Field of Patient Experience

Posted By Deanna Frings, Tuesday, April 5, 2016
Updated: Tuesday, April 5, 2016

I was recently invited to participate in a panel discussion on the topic of talent and the patient experience at an event for healthcare human resource professionals.  The event says so much about how far we have come in our understanding of what it takes to support patient experience excellence and this emerging field.  Preparing for this event gave me the opportunity to step back and reflect on the field of patient experience. 

Prior to joining the team at The Beryl Institute, I was a member of this global community of practice and attended the PX Conference in 2012.  It was here that I first heard about the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge, a framework of 15 broadly accepted domains reflecting the knowledge and skills of a patient experience professional.  

As I sat listening to the details of the framework and how it came to be, I was thrilled not only because over 400 individuals from 10 countries contributed to its development but it was the first time I began thinking about what I did as a growing profession, a field of practice and an emerging field.  I had something concrete to take back to my own organization that so clearly framed this field of patient experience and defined its core ideas.  

You see, my entry into patient experience started like many across the country.  I was asked to be part of a committee within my health system charged with implementing tactics that would improve our patient satisfaction scores.  Over the next several years, that committee membership evolved to a dedicated role as the Director of Patient and Family Relations leading the organization’s efforts on building a culture of experience excellence.  Our journey was very similar to others as evidenced in the findings of The State of the Patient Experience 2015 Study showing a growing acknowledgement from senior executives on the importance of investing resources dedicated to patient experience leaders. 

Fast forwarding to late spring 2014, I had been in my role with The Beryl Institute as the Director of Learning & Professional Development for one year and we had launched the first five PX Body of Knowledge courses.  In 2015, we achieved a major milestone when all 15 courses became available, one for each domain.   It was the first time a comprehensive program was available supporting professional development of healthcare leaders in the field of patient experience. 

We have since awarded a total of over 60 Certificates in Patient Experience Leadership and Patient Advocacy and there are over 250 currently completing the PX Body of Knowledge courses.  Not only do these numbers show the high level of interest patient experience professionals have in developing their knowledge and skills but they show again the acknowledgement by senior executives of the critical role of leadership in achieving patient experience excellence.

As I come to a close with my reflections, I would be remiss if I did not mention the incredible work at our sister organization, Patient Experience Institute.  Following a rigorous and standardized process and involving hundreds of members of the global patient experience community, the first inaugural Certified Patient Experience Professional (CPXP) exam was launched this past December. Achievement of CPXP certification highlights a commitment to the profession and to maintaining current skills and knowledge in supporting and expanding the field of patient experience and demonstrates clear qualifications to senior leaders, colleagues, and the industry. 

It’s always nice to reflect back as a means to identify the progress made. We know patient experience matters, it continues to be a top priority and there is a growing acknowledgement of the critical need and value for dedicated patient experience leaders.  And to that end, we must all take action in shaping the future field of patient experience.

  1. There is a recognized need for individuals with the knowledge and skills to lead patient experience efforts.  Use the PX Body of Knowledge framework to assess your professional development needs and build a plan to advance your knowledge and skills.
  2. Everyone plays an important role in the patient experience.  Share the framework with your Human Resource partners and work with them integrating the patient experience leadership competencies as part of an overall talent management strategy.
  3. Senior Leaders recognize that leadership is a strategic asset.  Be a role model and distinguish yourself as a leader in today’s healthcare marketplace.  Work within your organization's advocating and in supporting all healthcare leaders have the skills and knowledge critical to ensure the best experiences for your patients, their families and your employees positioning your organization to drive the best in outcomes for all you serve.  

As the journey continues, I’m excited about the future.  I encourage each of you to be part of the ongoing conversation sharing your ideas on how to support, educate and influence the many leaders across all functions within your organization.  I know I'm looking forward to the conversation next week with healthcare human resource professionals as they explore their role in ensuring an excellent experience for all.

Deanna Frings
Director, Learning and Professional Development
The Beryl Institute

 

Tags:  community  community of practice  employee engagement  engagement  healthcare  improving patient experience  Leadership  Patient Experience  service excellence 

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When the Patient Experience becomes more Personal

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Wednesday, March 2, 2016

We have an incredibly passionate community at The Beryl Institute. I know for many that passion has been fueled by personal experiences that drove them to be part of this work. Others have been inspired to join the patient experience movement to spread what they believe is the right thing to do for those we serve. And sometimes while doing this work they have encountered their own life experiences, whether small bumps in the road or larger life-changing events, that reinforced the importance of patient experience and provided new perspective to guide their efforts.

Last year I experienced this firsthand when my daughter, Maya, dislocated and fractured her elbow while cheerleading. She had an emergency reduction surgery the night of the accident to put her elbow back in place and a second surgery a few days later to insert a screw to correct the fracture. All went well, but they decided to keep her overnight to help control her pain and that one night provided an incredible opportunity for reflection and perspective for me as a person who has built a career in patient experience. 

While I work everyday to share stories and practices of how our community works to improve the healthcare experience, I’ve been fortunate to have very few patient or family experiences myself. It’s amazing how your perspective intensifies when you’re sitting inside a hospital room observing the care of a loved one.

A few ideas were reinforced for me that night and, as simple as they are, I believe they are important considerations as we address overall experience.

  • Patients (and those who love and care for them) are incredibly vulnerable in a healthcare setting. Maya and I are pretty confident in our regular routines, but we were a bit clueless at the hospital – even with simple things such as ordering meals and turning on the TV. More significantly, we were at the hands of the staff to know what medicines she should have, if her body was reacting as it should to the surgery and how to best control the pain. We had to trust the healthcare team. As a children’s hospital, I must acknowledge they had several things in place that helped Maya feel more comfortable. Volunteers brought her a stuffed lamb and they let her select from a fun collection of super soft blankets to use while there that she could also take home. The hospital even had a Build-a-Bear Workshop on site, which I believe was the key motivator in getting her walking around post-surgery. Any steps, however large or small, an organization can to take to comfort and ease the feeling of vulnerability can have a significant impact.  
  • Healthcare workers are human. I think people often place doctors and nurses on pedestals in their minds assuming they should have perfect accuracy, bedside manners and responsiveness. While Maya had some great people caring for her, I was quickly reminded they were human. They had varied levels of experience, focus and relationship skills. As humans they also had their own lives that did have an impact on how they cared for my daughter – maybe stresses at home, conflict with co-workers or even their own health challenges. Regardless of how dedicated and professional, humans make mistakes. I came to appreciate all the checks and balances they implemented to help prevent that. At first I was a little disturbed by the redundant questions like “What is your name? Birthday? Any allergies?” But as I reminded myself the staff were each caring for multiple patients, I learned to appreciate their diligence to make sure everything matched up. I encourage healthcare workers to explain the needs for these steps to patients as this goes a long way in giving them confidence in their healthcare team.
  • Patients need advocates. The vulnerability and realization that the staff treating Maya were human reinforced a point that sometimes gets overlooked in healthcare – the important role of the caregiver. A few years ago a co-worker’s husband was in the hospital and she refused to leave his side. As much as she respected the healthcare team caring for him, she realized no one had his best interest at heart as much as she did. She was there to be sure they gave him the right medicines, at the right times and in the right amounts. She kept a journal of his condition and symptoms to share with the doctor, and she was there to be sure he ate, had food choices he liked and any assistance he needed. After being in the hospital with Maya for just one night, I understood her point completely, and not just because Maya was 11. The caregiver can play a vital role in helping ensure quality, safety and experience are what they should be in all care settings.

Maya was lucky that her hospital stay was short and she was quickly on the road to recovery. Being with her that night enriched my perspective and purpose, both as a mom caring for a child and as a professional committed to help make the healthcare experience the best it can be for everyone.

We are currently working on a white paper at the Institute that will share the stories of many patient experience leaders who, in the face of a personal health experience – however large or small, shifted their perspective from PX leader to patient or patient’s family member. If you are willing to share your story, we encourage you to participate in this project. 

Stacy Palmer
Vice President, Strategy and Member Experience
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  choice  community  engagement  Field of Patient Experience  improving patient experience  patient  patient and family  patient engagement  Patient Experience  perception  service excellence  voice 

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