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Increasing the Value of The Beryl Institute Membership

Posted By Denise R. Weathers, Thursday, March 8, 2018
Updated: Thursday, March 8, 2018

For years, The Beryl Institute has offered the community a growing library of resources to support you in leading a positive patient experience effort for your organization. Over the past year, the Institute has experienced some major accomplishments highlighted in our 2017 Year In Review. As we continue the commitment to improving the human experience by offering value-added resources and services, the need for our members become ever so important. The question has become – how can The Beryl Institute best serve its members and the patient experience community?

Through our Annual Member Experience Survey distributed in December 2017, you helped us address this question by providing your much-deserved feedback. To highlight a few observations, we asked what you thought of the services that are being offered by the Institute. Similar to previous survey results, the top six most-valued and accessed member benefits are Publications, such as White Papers and Research Reports, Webinars, E- Newsletters (PX Monthly and PX Newslink), Learning Bites, PX Connect, the latest member benefit and the PX Conference.

Although the above-mentioned resources were rated as the most-valued resources, the one word that was consistent throughout the survey feedback and placed an even wider smile on our faces was “Community.” Relationships are considered by many to be the most important and satisfying aspect of life, and your partnership with The Beryl Institute provides you with a diverse global community of physicians, nurses, patient experience leaders, patient and family advisors, consultants, etc., in various healthcare settings, coming together to support one common goal…to improve the patient and human experience in healthcare. Community matters in patient experience and we must ensure it does for the power of the collection of voices in our movement and in the work, it calls us to do every day.

Community speaks to the heart of who we are and to the resources and opportunities we develop for you to engage in for learning, the collection and dissemination of ideas and the connection among peers such as your ability to connect in the recent addition of the online member community, PX Connect, and by attending the 2018 PX Conference, coming up next month April 16-18 at the Hyatt Regency Chicago.

The Power of community has also been elevated with the recent emergence of the PX Policy Forum and the newly formed Nurse Executive Council. To further increase the value of your membership, the Institute has or is taking steps to improve your member experience by providing:

 

Enhanced offerings for professional development and learning exploring how the Institute can elevate the partner organizations and speakers who present at its professional development learning areas such as webinars, PX Conference, Regional Roundtables and PX Grand Rounds; engaging and leveraging discussions in the online patient experience member community, PX Connect, to develop untapped content and resources; and, organizing content collaboration targets for specific areas we recognize may have some gaps such as Ambulatory Care, Physician Office Setting and Long-Term Care, to name a few.

 

 Increased member benefit awareness with enhanced communications highlighting targeted member benefits such as: Career Center, expanded volunteer opportunities and PX Connect, and include Patient Experience Continuing Education (PXE) credit offerings through most of the professional development and learning programs, pending approval.

 

Innovation, research and global presence by adding an Experience Innovation position to expand the Institute’s global landscape of groundbreaking advancements in the PX evolution.


It is our commitment to be that organization…that patient experience community that identifies and address your needs more effectively and one that provides an optimal suite of patient experience resources, products and services at the most affordable investment and value.

The Beryl Institute staff are here to serve you. We hope the continued focus on improving the resources, products and services display our commitment and our drive to showcase and support you and your organization on your patient experience journey.

Do you have ideas on how we could continue to increase the value of The Beryl Institute membership? Email me at denise.weathers@theberylinstitute.org with your ideas and suggestions.

 

Denise R. Weathers
Vice President, Membership
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  commitment  Community  community of practice  member benefit  member survey  member value  px connect 

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Reaffirming the Core Values of Patient Experience

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Friday, February 3, 2017
Updated: Friday, February 3, 2017

The idea that healthcare is, at its core, about human beings caring for human beings is not a new or surprising notion, but the foundations of this concept seem more relevant today for all the challenges we in healthcare, and now in many ways those beyond, are working to overcome. As we look to where the experience movement has come from to where it is rapidly moving, we find it is grounded in the fundamentals of all that is right and good at the core of our humanity. The patient experience in healthcare is ultimately the human experience. It is encountered in every healthcare interaction and impacts and is affected by not just those receiving care, but by all engaged in ensuring it is delivered with the utmost in quality, safety and service.

I have watched the recent events taking place both in the United States and around the world with both great curiosity and some concern. The first words used to define patient experience – the sum of all interactions – may be no more important now as we work to not only be cognizant of the interactions we each have, but also to reinforce the power that exists in ensuring positive interactions are at the core of all we do. These interactions, as the definition continues, are shaped by the very culture we create and espouse in the organizations and systems we build and sustain. And this culture must be grounded in the values we hold true in guiding our decisions and framing our actions.

It seemed now was an appropriate and important time to reinforce and reaffirm the core values we introduced in late 2015 that have been central to our work at The Beryl Institute. We have also continued to find these values implicitly at work in the many organizations striving to achieve experience excellence overall. With all that is pushing and pulling at us in recent days, as people ponder the future of healthcare policy and practice and as we consider the broader implications on human connectivity, it seemed time to reiterate both our commitment to these values, as well as call on all committed to this work, and to the greater human experience, to reflect on what these ideas truly mean. I list our values below with my thoughts on their importance today:

  • ACCESSIBILITY. I have always believed in a focus on experience as in life we have a great opportunity with a mindset of abundance.  Accessibility is about fairness and equity, about providing opportunity and the ability to connect to information and people, and to do so in a way that removes barriers to and actively encourages engagement and a free exchange of ideas.
  • AGILITY. In a world that is no longer measured by years or even months, but rather pushed on one side by rapid increases in technology and on the other by ceaseless waves of information, people and the organizations they comprise must be anything but static in thought, process or action. It is no longer about readiness to change, but the ability to be changing always, while ensuring consistency to your commitments and desired outcomes.
  • INNOVATION. The same pressures that call for our agility require we no longer look backward for how things can, have or should be done. In listening, exploring, doing and being willing to fail we push the very boundaries that could otherwise restrain our ability to move with (and if intentional in our efforts, lead) the very changes we need.
  • INCLUSIVITY. This idea at the heart of experience may be no more critical than today. From all voices matter in patient experience to underlining all voices matter, perspectives have value, diversity adds flavor and difference catalyzes opportunities for even greater outcomes. We cannot and must not let fear or worse, lack of understanding, cause us to shrink from one another when it is the very interactions we create, engage in and encourage that will remain fundamental to the human experience. On this we must remain steadfast.
  • COLLABORATION. At the roots of the Institute itself was the belief that if we are willing to share our ideas openly, without hesitation, we would reap greater returns than we could working alone in the dark. This idea of connection has been essential to our own growth and exemplifies a great opportunity we still have overall. If we all believe we are here for an ultimate goal, be it experience excellence, or something greater, it calls on us to find the bridges that lead us to connection and opportunity, not the chasms that seed distinctions, misunderstanding and missed possibility.

We are at an exciting time in the experience movement. I believe we are entering an experience era that reinforces all that is good about what each and every one of you strive to do each day in working to personally heal and/or provide healing for others. In each of our personal journeys is a great opportunity to travel this path with not only an understanding of ourselves, but perhaps more so with an unwavering commitment to others. In reaffirming the values we hold true to patient experience, we are making a statement about all we believe is right and good as human beings caring for human beings around the world. That must remain our cause.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., CPXP
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  collaboration  commitment  community of practice  connection  culture  experience era  global  healthcare policy  policy  values 

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The State of Patient Experience: A Global Inquiry for Local Action

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Earlier this week in a webinar hosted by the Institute, I shared thoughts on why patient experience matters now more than ever. At a time when policy uncertainty hangs in the air, there must not be any uncertainty about the importance of a commitment to experience and the actions required to ensure it remains at the heart of what we do in healthcare. We have a collective responsibility to ensure the strategies, practices and processes necessary to drive experience excellence continue with unwavering commitment. We too must underline and be willing to speak to the impact a focus on experience can and does provide.

This focus is what is guiding the strategic intent of The Beryl Institute as we look to ensure the human experience is the heart of healthcare around the globe and is grounded in the very efforts we not only look to take on ourselves, but also encourage others to explore. We are at a critical time where we must gather evidence, reinforce value, provide grounded research and share efforts in ways that help people act with confidence and support leaders in making strong and committed choices.

This is not a time for passivity; in simply accepting consumerism has arrived or that a focus on value has become central to our efforts. Rather those committed to experience in healthcare must be doing more; not just to achieve individual and organizational outcomes, but to support an expanding dialogue that ensures all corners of healthcare commit to and reflect in their actions the principles central to an industry which at its core is about human beings caring for human beings.

With that call to action, I asked four questions of those listening. These questions were more than a cause for reflection. Rather I see them as an opportunity to plot a course forward for each of us engaging in the experience movement. I provide them here to both encourage your own consideration, but also to invite your comments. I hope you will share what you plan to do.

  • How will you reinforce the importance of experience in your work and/or as a consumer of care?
  • What top issues are most critical to you in this effort and how will you elevate them as a focus for your work?
  • How will you support others in standing as champions for experience excellence?
  • How will we expand the experience conversation to change healthcare for the better?

In this, the experience era, a fundamental commitment must be a readiness to share wildly and steal willingly. This means we must not only try new things, and whether succeed or fail share our lessons learned, but we must also search out other’s ideas and see how they fit, challenge or complement our own. This free flow of evidence, of practice, and of thinking is what will strengthen the capacity of all focused on experience across the healthcare continuum. It is what grounds our ability to achieve all we aspire to in providing the best outcomes possible. It is also this sense of sharing that underlines our biggest research endeavor at the Institute – our State of Patient Experience Study.

It is time once again for you to share your voice and encourage others to do the same in our 4th biennial study. I invite and ask each of you to not only participate in this year’s exploration, but also share this opportunity with your colleagues and peers. We look to gather input from organizations across the continuum of care, perspective from consumers of healthcare and insights from around the world to best understand both the ‘whats’ and ‘whys’ that are driving experience efforts today. This commitment to taking action and sharing your voice is critical to this endeavor and I do hope you will participate. You can get started by clicking this link: http://bit.ly/StateofPX2017. We will share the initial findings of this year’s study at the opening of Patient Experience Conference 2017.

In concluding our 2015 study I wrote, “In our patient experience movement and in the data that frame its efforts, we are not just seeing incremental movement, but fundamental shifts in behavior, practice and perspective. We are experiencing a shift in the very habits of the people and organizations in healthcare. We are seeing an alignment around the idea that patient experience matters.” It is the very efforts that every one of you are taking on, helping lead or encouraging others to tackle that is inspiring this possibility. That in recognizing experience matters, now more than ever our global understanding can drive local action. In doing so we are staying true to our commitment in providing the best experience possible for all those in or affected by healthcare around our world. Thank you in advance for your input and contribution.

Again, you can begin the survey here: http://bit.ly/StateofPX2017

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., CPXP
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  benchmarking  commitment  global  healthcare policy  human experience  inquiry  matters  movement  research  state of patient experience 

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Supporting the Expanding Field of Patient Experience

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Thursday, June 9, 2016
Updated: Thursday, June 9, 2016

This week we opened the call for submissions for Patient Experience Conference 2017. It will mark the seventh official year for this event, the annual gathering bringing together the collective voices of healthcare professionals and patients/families across the globe to convene, engage in and expand the dialogue on improving patient experience. 

Each year we’ve seen significant increases is conference participation, with almost 1,000 people gathering in Dallas this past April to share, learn and network with one another. Similarly The Beryl Institute community itself continues to grow, now made up of over 45,000 members and guests from 55 countries. We believe this growth signifies the expansion of the patient experience movement. Leaders are realizing a focus on experience is a necessity for survival in the ever-changing healthcare environment.

We’ve watched the field develop with some organizations now appointing Chief Experience Officers to guide efforts and strategy. Patient Experience Institute, a sister organization of The Beryl Institute, has established a formal designation for Certified Patient Experience Professionals – and over 140 organizations now have one or more CPXPs on staff. Hundreds of individuals are expanding their professional development through the PX Body of Knowledge certificate programs. And Patient Experience Week was established to celebrate those who positively impact experience every day. 

Without a doubt, the field of patient experience is expanding.

This expansion continues to change the dynamics of The Beryl Institute Community. When we began as a membership organization in late 2010, most of our members were just getting started on their patient experience journeys. They were incredibly willing to share the successes and struggles along the way – which led to the abundance of community-developed content that exists and continues to grow today.

While we’ll always offer resources, support and encouragement to those beginning their efforts, we must continue to elevate the conversation to also support those further along on their journeys. Many of you are now looking to the community for information on how you can take things to the next level. How do you sustain your programs? What can you do to develop deeper engagement opportunities with patients and family members? How can you bring down silos that exist within your organization? How do you integrate social media into experience efforts?

The expansion of the field and our commitment to provide the breadth and levels of content needed to support the community led us to a significant change in the conference call for submissions process for 2017. As you complete the submission form for a standard breakout, mini session or poster – and we invite you to consider doing so – you’ll be asked to identify the development stage for your content, specifically your submission is ideal for individuals with:

  • Minimal knowledge and experience. Looking for some basic information, key principles and "how to’s” on the subject.
  • Working knowledge and some proven experience. Looking for breath or depth in the subject, how to sustain and engage others and/or dealing with resistance to change on the subject. 
  • Authoritative knowledge and proven success. Looking for advanced knowledge and examples to evolve their understanding and practice on the subject. 

This is the scale our Learning and Professional Development team considers regularly as they develop content for our webinars, topic calls and other resources, and we're excited to now apply this process to Patient Experience Conference. This information will guide our volunteer reviewers and conference planning committee to develop a well-balanced program that meets the needs of participants at all levels. We’ll identify sessions as beginning, intermediate or advanced so you can make the most-informed choices on what sessions you will attend to customize your learning experience. 

It’s important to acknowledge, however, that levels of learning can be both subjective and cyclical. Organizations who once excelled at certain facets of patient experience may find themselves slipping in that area over time and in need of a basic refresher. And organizations just beginning a patient experience journey might have certain areas in which they already perform well ahead of the curve. There will always be a need to support all levels of development and we are committed to sharing that breadth of resources.  We thank you in advance for your contributions to the community. Sharing your story and knowledge truly represents the core idea that we are ALL the Patient Experience!


Stacy Palmer
Vice President, Strategy and Member Experience 
The Beryl Institute
 

Tags:  collaboration  commitment  community  community of practice  engagement  Field of Patient Experience  global healthcare  healthcare  improving patient experience  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  service excellence 

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It is Time for the Experience Era

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Thursday, May 5, 2016
Updated: Thursday, May 5, 2016

Just three weeks ago as we gathered at Patient Experience Conference 2016 I challenged our participants and the public watching us live that this is our moment in patient experience. If we look to make the kind of change we believe is needed in our new healthcare world, we must work to ensure the conversation on patient experience now rests at the heart of healthcare itself.

This commitment to experience requires a macro-perspective and one I continue to reinforce every chance I can. Patient (and family, resident, elder, etc.) experience is not just about satisfaction or even essential efforts such as patient engagement or approaches such as patient- and family-centeredness. Rather experience is ALL someone has in their encounter with a healthcare organization, be it in a clinical setting at the bedside or exam room, scheduling an appointment, engaging with a bill, and even communicating with a friend at a community event or while at the local market. Every one of these interactions shape the experience someone has, they shape the story someone carries with them about it and influences their perceptions and ultimately their actions.

The bottom line is that in your healthcare organization and the thousands around the world that are engaging with or attending to the needs of their customers right now, you are providing an experience. The question is, are you strategically planning for and addressing it? In a consumer driven healthcare world, regardless of national system, policy incentives or other supports or constraints, the ultimate opportunity is to ensure experience is not simply left to chance. Rather it should be part of the very fiber of your organization, representing the kind of encounters you hope to provide and the outcomes you look to achieve. Yes, at its core, experience encompasses all we tackle in healthcare from quality, safety and service interactions to the implications of cost and the influence that outcomes have on public, systemic and personal health decisions.

I also believe as the experience movement coalesces around these core ideas it has the opportunity to stand with conviction, grounded in evidence, to declare that experience drives the very outcomes we look to achieve in healthcare: clinical outcomes, financial results, consumer loyalty and community reputation. In the latest issue of Patient Experience Journal, I offer, "An investment in a strong and positive patient experience is the leading choice you can and should be making in healthcare today. The results of this decision will only lead to even greater and lasting results.”

This then may be our simple, yet significant call to action. That we recognize and act on the reality that experience encompasses all we do in healthcare and drives the outcomes we aspire to. In that light it brings us to reflect on a new era in healthcare. Thanks to insights from Don Berwick in challenging us to consider a third (what he calls the moral) era, I hope to push us further. Beyond just acknowledging the operational considerations he suggests as we look at how healthcare as a system progresses, we too must look at healthcare for all it was intended to and still must strive to accomplish. It is time to place the human experience back at the heart of healthcare. It is time for the experience era.

The experience era calls us to consider 8 fundamental actions:

  • Acknowledge experience is a global movement
  • Recognize experience encompasses all we do
  • Remember in experience all voices matter
  • Focus on value from the perspective of the consumer
  • Ensure transparency for accessibility & understanding
  • Measure & incent what matters
  • Share wildly and steal willingly
  • Reignite our commitment to purpose

If we move forward with purpose and choose to align our efforts with an experience mindset, we not only welcome the experience era; we reignite the heart of healthcare itself. With a focus on those we care for and serve and a commitment to those who provide care and support those efforts every day, we can build the most healthy and vibrant system of care the world has ever seen. It will take all voices to do this, all nations to commit, all systems to realign themselves and all organizations to focus their intention. It will take all of us to make the choice that experience matters and then act. That is the opportunity we now have in front of us…I am ready for our first steps forward together.

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  aligning efforts  commitment  encounters  experience era  interaction  movement  Patient Experience Conference  purpose  value 

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Patient experience excellence requires moving beyond resolutions

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Thursday, January 8, 2015
Updated: Thursday, January 8, 2015

In talking with an old healthcare colleague this week about our plans for the year ahead, she shared one of her New Year’s resolutions was to focus more purposefully on improving the patient experience in her organization. While an admirable intention and perhaps also shared for my benefit as she knows I focus on this effort, it actually caused me to take pause.

The statement had me wonder where in the priority list experience now rests for both individual leaders and organizations. The Beryl Institute’s bi-annual patient experience benchmarking study as well as other research continues to show experience remains a top priority in healthcare. But, as my friend’s statement raised for me, I began to question if this priority was a resolution or response based on something one thought they should say or rather a statement of commitment to purpose and action. 

As we start 2015, we can say with confidence that great strides have been made as we continue to push the experience movement forward. I believe there is a greater agreement on the importance of experience overall as a driver of better outcomes clinically, organizationally and fiscally. There is also stronger recognition in the power of patient and family voice and perspective and an acknowledgement of the need to align efforts around an integrated approach to quality, safety and service improvement. Also of significance is an increase in formal definitions of experience being adopted by healthcare organizations (a question we will explore again in the 2015 benchmarking study) and the associated focus on personal interactions and culture as reinforced by The Beryl Institute’s shared definition of patient experience. Finally we have seen a rise in the role of senior experience leaders, i.e. Chief (Patient) Experience Officers, system level VPs of Experience, etc.

In thinking about what these indicators of progress represent, they represent much more than resolutions, which are simple statements of intent. These efforts and the impact they are having reflect clear commitments to action and they represent tangible investments in time, people and resources. That commitment is what I have come to not only believe, but also see as the differentiator in patient experience excellence and success.

I am often asked the question ‘what should we do to improve patient experience in our organization’; in fact my colleague posed just that question after sharing her resolution. I could tell that she, as many others do, were looking for the checklist of practices, in order of priority, she could put in place to make a difference. My challenge to this question was reinforced in the very conversation and came back to what the growth of this movement has shown us all.

The tactics are clear, reasoned and can have an impact, but it is a commitment to something bigger that leads to the best in outcomes. Commitment is about purpose and intent, focus and strategy. It is about building a plan that meets your organization and those your serve where they are and works to stretch them all as partners and contributors to where you want to go. Yes commitment is a choice, which I find to be at the heart of experience success, and then smart choices can help you to identify the "what’s” we all are searching for.

As we look to the year ahead, I can say without hesitation that the patient experience movement continues on. We look to help guide this at the Institute through our own commitments: the growth of our resources and a global community now almost 30,000 strong, the continued support of research through the expanded reach of Patient Experience Journal and the development of professionals through new learning and formal certification. And I believe the movement continues on more so because of what choices you and your peers will make.

In committing to experience improvement, be it in physician practices or ambulatory settings, acute care or pediatrics, long-term care or hospice, you have moved beyond the idea of a resolution. Your choices, the ones you help others make and the ones you offer and honor are where we will build the next levels of our collective efforts. I, your team from, and your peers in the Institute community remain committed to keeping this movement progressing and together it will lead to even great things for the year ahead. Happy New Year to you all.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institue

Tags:  commitment  excellence  new year  patient experience  resolutions 

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