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The Beryl Institute Patient Experience Blog
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Patient Experience: A Global Conversation

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Thursday, May 4, 2017
Updated: Thursday, May 4, 2017

I am writing this blog as we wrap up the 2017 Patient Experience Symposium in Sydney. The event, a collaboration among healthcare and consumer organizations in Australia committed to engaging in and expanding the conversation on patient experience, comes on the heels of an incredible Patent Experience Week where we saw organizations from around the globe celebrating those committed to excellence in patient experience. In that same period, we had the release of the latest issue of Patient Experience Journal (PXJ) that brought together perspectives from around the world and is now read in over 190 countries and territories.

As I reflect on just these last few days, they represent a significant statement about where the patient experience movement is going. They also offer us some perspective on the opportunity we have before us and the efforts we must consider in moving to action overall. The experience movement that bloomed in the last decade and that some called a fad that would soon pass or an idea that would be obscured by shifting policy focus or diluted by competing priorities, instead has found itself expanding with purpose.

As Jane Cummings, CNO England wrote in her commentary in the latest PXJ, “the global dialogue on patient experience will become even more important, as we recognise that despite differences in design and operation, the challenges our health systems face and the focus on what matters most to patients are shared.” This recognition that we are moving to a macro effort, acknowledging the reality of our own individual systemic constraints not as impediments, but perhaps learning points to be leveraged is where opportunity calls us. In looking across systems boundaries and peeling back policy layers, we reveal fundamentals that rest solidly at the heart of the experience conversation. These ideas were reinforced in the latest State of Patient Experience data just released during Patient Experience Conference 2017.

  1. Experience must remain an integrated focus on quality, safety, service and more. To provide the best in experience and effect positive change, we can no longer force boundaries between these efforts in the face that they are all part of what patients, families and consumers encounter.
  2. The fastest growing area of focus for organizations in addressing experience is employee engagement. This rapid rise in both recognition of and focus on staff needs in the healthcare ecosystem is fundamental and significant. The idea that we must take care of ourselves to take care of others, is not just motherly advice, but sound strategic thinking in a business where we are human beings caring for human beings.
  3. In finding employee engagement at the heart of all we do, it is forever intertwined with the engagement of patients and family members as partners in this work, not only in their own care plans, but in the very work we must do to redesign our systems of care, co-design new processes and better understand the needs of those we serve. My visit this last two weeks in Australia and the opportunity to engage with both the consumer councils in New South Wales and Western Australia reinforced the critical point that patients, family and community members are partners in and consumers of care. This idea spans our globe and must be central to any actions we take.

In all that I had the chance to see and learn during my last 10 days in Australia, what was shared over PX Week and is part of the ongoing patient experience conversation, not only are these core ideas central across time zones, there are core practices that follow as well. These include ideas such as the intentional collection of actionable data – both through formal survey methods and now more so in real time to address critical issues and build cases for change, interdisciplinary rounds and bedside shift reports and handoffs, creating formal structures and processes for engaging patients and families on councils, boards and committees and expanding how staff and employees can provide feedback and contribute to improvements.

In finding core ideas and common ground, we must also acknowledge the work of patient experience is not easy work. It is not something we master simply by creating checklists or wrangle with protocols. It is something that requires strategic commitment, an openness to collaboration and sharing and perhaps most of all an acknowledgement that we are all in this effort together. There is a global conversation taking place on patient experience, one focused on creating the best healthcare systems driving the best results on all corners of our globe.

We must now be willing to share wildly and steal willingly in order to learn from one another and improve. That is our greatest and most critical opportunity and one we should not take lightly. We are in a unique and opportune moment in healthcare, for as an industry in serving those in front of us, we can and will bring this world closer. It is a conversation I am honored to be a part of and one I, and I hope each of you, will strive every day to champion.

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., CPXP
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  collaboration  community of practice  employee engagement  global  partnership  patient and family engagement  patient experience week  state of patient experience 

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Reaffirming the Core Values of Patient Experience

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Friday, February 3, 2017
Updated: Friday, February 3, 2017

The idea that healthcare is, at its core, about human beings caring for human beings is not a new or surprising notion, but the foundations of this concept seem more relevant today for all the challenges we in healthcare, and now in many ways those beyond, are working to overcome. As we look to where the experience movement has come from to where it is rapidly moving, we find it is grounded in the fundamentals of all that is right and good at the core of our humanity. The patient experience in healthcare is ultimately the human experience. It is encountered in every healthcare interaction and impacts and is affected by not just those receiving care, but by all engaged in ensuring it is delivered with the utmost in quality, safety and service.

I have watched the recent events taking place both in the United States and around the world with both great curiosity and some concern. The first words used to define patient experience – the sum of all interactions – may be no more important now as we work to not only be cognizant of the interactions we each have, but also to reinforce the power that exists in ensuring positive interactions are at the core of all we do. These interactions, as the definition continues, are shaped by the very culture we create and espouse in the organizations and systems we build and sustain. And this culture must be grounded in the values we hold true in guiding our decisions and framing our actions.

It seemed now was an appropriate and important time to reinforce and reaffirm the core values we introduced in late 2015 that have been central to our work at The Beryl Institute. We have also continued to find these values implicitly at work in the many organizations striving to achieve experience excellence overall. With all that is pushing and pulling at us in recent days, as people ponder the future of healthcare policy and practice and as we consider the broader implications on human connectivity, it seemed time to reiterate both our commitment to these values, as well as call on all committed to this work, and to the greater human experience, to reflect on what these ideas truly mean. I list our values below with my thoughts on their importance today:

  • ACCESSIBILITY. I have always believed in a focus on experience as in life we have a great opportunity with a mindset of abundance.  Accessibility is about fairness and equity, about providing opportunity and the ability to connect to information and people, and to do so in a way that removes barriers to and actively encourages engagement and a free exchange of ideas.
  • AGILITY. In a world that is no longer measured by years or even months, but rather pushed on one side by rapid increases in technology and on the other by ceaseless waves of information, people and the organizations they comprise must be anything but static in thought, process or action. It is no longer about readiness to change, but the ability to be changing always, while ensuring consistency to your commitments and desired outcomes.
  • INNOVATION. The same pressures that call for our agility require we no longer look backward for how things can, have or should be done. In listening, exploring, doing and being willing to fail we push the very boundaries that could otherwise restrain our ability to move with (and if intentional in our efforts, lead) the very changes we need.
  • INCLUSIVITY. This idea at the heart of experience may be no more critical than today. From all voices matter in patient experience to underlining all voices matter, perspectives have value, diversity adds flavor and difference catalyzes opportunities for even greater outcomes. We cannot and must not let fear or worse, lack of understanding, cause us to shrink from one another when it is the very interactions we create, engage in and encourage that will remain fundamental to the human experience. On this we must remain steadfast.
  • COLLABORATION. At the roots of the Institute itself was the belief that if we are willing to share our ideas openly, without hesitation, we would reap greater returns than we could working alone in the dark. This idea of connection has been essential to our own growth and exemplifies a great opportunity we still have overall. If we all believe we are here for an ultimate goal, be it experience excellence, or something greater, it calls on us to find the bridges that lead us to connection and opportunity, not the chasms that seed distinctions, misunderstanding and missed possibility.

We are at an exciting time in the experience movement. I believe we are entering an experience era that reinforces all that is good about what each and every one of you strive to do each day in working to personally heal and/or provide healing for others. In each of our personal journeys is a great opportunity to travel this path with not only an understanding of ourselves, but perhaps more so with an unwavering commitment to others. In reaffirming the values we hold true to patient experience, we are making a statement about all we believe is right and good as human beings caring for human beings around the world. That must remain our cause.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., CPXP
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  collaboration  commitment  community of practice  connection  culture  experience era  global  healthcare policy  policy  values 

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The Spirit of the PX Movement – Sharing, Learning and Improving Together

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Monday, December 12, 2016
Updated: Monday, December 12, 2016

After six years as a membership community focused on improving patient experience, we continue to be amazed and inspired by the generosity of our members and guests committed to this movement. The spirit of this work is illustrated perfectly by the willingness to share, learn and grow together.

Just last week we released a great example of this in action through the white paper, Guiding Principles for Patient Experience Excellence. We’re careful to always acknowledge there is no one recipe for improving patient experience, but we have identified eight themes consistent in organizations who have found success in this work. The paper shares those principles, reflects on why each is a critical consideration and, perhaps most importantly, highlights specific examples from 15 organizations who excel in one or more of these areas.

As in all the work shared through the Institute, the examples represent only a sample of the many approaches that could be tied to each principle. They are offered to spark thinking in ways others can move from concept to action. It’s the willingness of these organizations to share their successes that fuels that thinking for others.

The gifting of knowledge and experiences has helped to build the field of patient experience and establishes both credibility and accountability for our efforts. This year our sister organization, Patient Experience Institute, recognized the first three classes of Certified Patient Experience Professionals (CPXPs), an incredible statement and stride for the movement. We continue to see this work validated and see our community eager to spread the word on the importance of addressing experience excellence and sharing successes and challenges encountered along the way.

We wholeheartedly offer thanks to every individual and organization who contributed to this work over the past year. Thank you for every case study shared, On the Road visit or regional roundtable hosted, webinar or conference session presented, ListServ email sent, topic call or connection call attended and learning bite delivered. It’s through these and other collective efforts that we can truly shape this movement and positively impact the experiences of patients, families and caregivers.

Interested in learning more about how you can personally contribute to the community in 2017? Visit http://www.theberylinstitute.org/?page=CONNECTIONIDEAS.

 

Stacy Palmer, CPXP
Senior Vice President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  accountability  collaboration  community  community of practice  engagement  Field of Patient Experience  healthcare  improving patient experience  networking  patient experience  thought leadership 

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Supporting the Expanding Field of Patient Experience

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Thursday, June 9, 2016
Updated: Thursday, June 9, 2016

This week we opened the call for submissions for Patient Experience Conference 2017. It will mark the seventh official year for this event, the annual gathering bringing together the collective voices of healthcare professionals and patients/families across the globe to convene, engage in and expand the dialogue on improving patient experience. 

Each year we’ve seen significant increases is conference participation, with almost 1,000 people gathering in Dallas this past April to share, learn and network with one another. Similarly The Beryl Institute community itself continues to grow, now made up of over 45,000 members and guests from 55 countries. We believe this growth signifies the expansion of the patient experience movement. Leaders are realizing a focus on experience is a necessity for survival in the ever-changing healthcare environment.

We’ve watched the field develop with some organizations now appointing Chief Experience Officers to guide efforts and strategy. Patient Experience Institute, a sister organization of The Beryl Institute, has established a formal designation for Certified Patient Experience Professionals – and over 140 organizations now have one or more CPXPs on staff. Hundreds of individuals are expanding their professional development through the PX Body of Knowledge certificate programs. And Patient Experience Week was established to celebrate those who positively impact experience every day. 

Without a doubt, the field of patient experience is expanding.

This expansion continues to change the dynamics of The Beryl Institute Community. When we began as a membership organization in late 2010, most of our members were just getting started on their patient experience journeys. They were incredibly willing to share the successes and struggles along the way – which led to the abundance of community-developed content that exists and continues to grow today.

While we’ll always offer resources, support and encouragement to those beginning their efforts, we must continue to elevate the conversation to also support those further along on their journeys. Many of you are now looking to the community for information on how you can take things to the next level. How do you sustain your programs? What can you do to develop deeper engagement opportunities with patients and family members? How can you bring down silos that exist within your organization? How do you integrate social media into experience efforts?

The expansion of the field and our commitment to provide the breadth and levels of content needed to support the community led us to a significant change in the conference call for submissions process for 2017. As you complete the submission form for a standard breakout, mini session or poster – and we invite you to consider doing so – you’ll be asked to identify the development stage for your content, specifically your submission is ideal for individuals with:

  • Minimal knowledge and experience. Looking for some basic information, key principles and "how to’s” on the subject.
  • Working knowledge and some proven experience. Looking for breath or depth in the subject, how to sustain and engage others and/or dealing with resistance to change on the subject. 
  • Authoritative knowledge and proven success. Looking for advanced knowledge and examples to evolve their understanding and practice on the subject. 

This is the scale our Learning and Professional Development team considers regularly as they develop content for our webinars, topic calls and other resources, and we're excited to now apply this process to Patient Experience Conference. This information will guide our volunteer reviewers and conference planning committee to develop a well-balanced program that meets the needs of participants at all levels. We’ll identify sessions as beginning, intermediate or advanced so you can make the most-informed choices on what sessions you will attend to customize your learning experience. 

It’s important to acknowledge, however, that levels of learning can be both subjective and cyclical. Organizations who once excelled at certain facets of patient experience may find themselves slipping in that area over time and in need of a basic refresher. And organizations just beginning a patient experience journey might have certain areas in which they already perform well ahead of the curve. There will always be a need to support all levels of development and we are committed to sharing that breadth of resources.  We thank you in advance for your contributions to the community. Sharing your story and knowledge truly represents the core idea that we are ALL the Patient Experience!


Stacy Palmer
Vice President, Strategy and Member Experience 
The Beryl Institute
 

Tags:  collaboration  commitment  community  community of practice  engagement  Field of Patient Experience  global healthcare  healthcare  improving patient experience  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  service excellence 

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How Will You Invest in Patient Experience in 2016?

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Tuesday, December 1, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, December 1, 2015

We recently celebrated our first five years as a community of practice and looked back, somewhat in awe, at the incredible growth of this organization over such a short time. The Beryl Institute is now a global community of almost 40,000 individuals passionate about improving the healthcare experience for patients, families and caregivers.

The momentum continues, as does the realization that organizations are making significant investments in time, energy and dollars to ensure they are prepared to deliver the best possible patient experience. We see these investments in many forms from hiring teams to training leaders and staff to building and supporting cultures of excellence.

As we shared in the 2015 State of Patient Experience Benchmarking study, senior patient experience leadership and staff investment is growing with 42% of respondents having a Chief Experience Officer (or comparable position) compared to only 22% two years ago.  Along with that, the size of patient experience teams is growing; 33% of organizations reported having five or more staff members supporting patient experience efforts. 

The Beryl Institute community reflects this trend as well. This year over 200 organizations will invest in institutional membership – meaning they provide unlimited access to the Institute’s white papers, webinars, topic calls, learning bites, etc. to everyone within their facility. They are making a statement that people in ALL roles impact the patient experience and should have access to research and collaboration that will assist their efforts.

We have also seen tremendous interest in learning and professional development programs intended to train patient experience leaders and other staff. We recently increased our virtual classroom offerings in the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge courses to support growing participation in the community-developed program that provides Certificates in Patient Experience Leadership and Patient Advocacy.

Patient Experience Conference had its largest attendance to date this year and we were honored to partner with member organizations to host sold out Regional Roundtable events in San Francisco, Charlotte and Minneapolis. Our community is eager to gain (and share) knowledge and to invest in their personal career growth. In fact, today our sister organization, Patient Experience Institute, will offer the first testing opportunity for those hoping to earn their CPXP, the professional certification for Patient Experience Leaders.

While we’re excited to celebrate the five-year milestone, we acknowledge how much work is still to be done. We imagine (and hope to help inspire) a world where all healthcare organizations appreciate the power and impact of patient experience efforts and make without hesitation the investments necessary to be the best they can be for patients and families.

Earlier this year we released Our Stand, a list of guiding principles we’ve identified in our five years of leading this work that can have significant impact on patient experience success. I share them again as a reminder as you evaluate your own efforts and consider what investment opportunities make sense to support your specific needs.

We believe organizations and systems committed to providing the best in experience WILL:

  • Identify and support accountable leadership with committed time and focused intent to shape and guide experience strategy
  • Establish and reinforce a strong, vibrant and positive organizational culture and all it comprises
  • Develop a formal definition for what experience is to their organization
  • Implement a defined process for continuous patient and family input and engagement
  • Engage all voices in driving comprehensive, systemic and lasting solutions
  • Look beyond clinical experience of care to all interactions and touch points
  • Focus on alignment across all segments of the continuum and the spaces in between
  • Encompass both a focus on healing and a commitment to well-being

As you prepare for the coming year I challenge you to reflect on your organization’s commitment to experience improvement. Where are you exceling and where are your opportunities to do even more for your patients, families, caregivers and staff? Our patient experience community is here to support your journey and I encourage you to take full advantage of the incredible resources and knowledge available. 

Wishing you a wonderful holiday season and a successful New Year!

 

Stacy Palmer
Vice President, Strategy and Member Experience
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  body of knowledge  certification  collaboration  community of practice  Continuum of Care  culture  employee engagement  Field of Patient Experience  global healthcare  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  Interactions  Leadership  Nurse Leadership  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  Regional Roundtable  service excellence 

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Reframing the Core Values for Patient Experience

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Tuesday, November 10, 2015

When we began the patient experience journey at The Beryl Institute just five years ago, we were surprised to find that in a healthcare landscape peppered with talk of patient centeredness and an expanding dialogue on patient engagement and grounded in the fundamental principles of quality and patient safety, there was not an overarching discussion on the broader experience of patients and families – beyond that is what was dubbed the patient experience of care. I believe we have from and through that time to today come to recognize that when we talk about experience – the healthcare experience – it encompasses all those ideas. We can also acknowledge that in its simplest of forms, patients, family members and loved ones and individuals serving as care providers or in support services all have an experience in healthcare every day – whether it is strategically planned or just left to fate.

For this reason, in our first steps at the Institute, we gathered a team of individuals to wrap our arms around what we meant in discussing the patient experience. From the contributions of many voices, we found a broad and encompassing idea. That patient experience is the sum of all interactions shaped by an organizations’ culture that influences patient perceptions across the continuum of care. The simplicity of these words was meant, and still does mean, to reflect much more. Experience is about interactions across the continuum, in the spaces in between, grounded in who we are as organizations in our actions and engagement with both those who encounter and work within them. Ultimately, it is about the partnership we establish with patients and the perceptions they take away. These are the lasting ripples of personal and quality care that represents the dimensionality of any human journey across the healthcare continuum today.

This need for definition was reinforced by the rapid focus on these core ideas in the experience conversation and was supported by an integrated and broad conversation on what the patient experience, and the healthcare experience, truly means today. In continuing to watch these ideas in action, I also saw a pattern emerging in those organizations with a commitment and focus on positive outcomes. Interestingly enough, these same ideas were evolving as fundamental to who we were at The Beryl Institute ourselves, as a collective community of front line caregivers and healthcare executives, resources providers and consultants, physicians, patients and families alike. What we saw emerging was a core set of values fundamental to community and experience success overall.

In this, we came to offer the following ideas as core values for our work at The Beryl Institute. I, too, believe in traveling the experience journey over the last five years and seeing all the good being done in providing the best in experience that these values, whether made explicit or not, are central to experience excellence overall. They include:

  • Accessibility: A commitment to open access, a spirit of generosity and the active invitation to engage and contribute that continuously expands reach and sustains growth
  • Agility: The ability to rapidly reconfigure and realign resources to lead new directions and respond as needed within the industry
  • Innovation: A vigilance in continuously searching for new ways of thinking, doing and disseminating ideas
  • Inclusivity: The purposeful consideration of expansive ideas and the engagement of all voices to ensure the broadest perspective and awareness
  • Collaboration: A recognition that overall success is driven by a willingness to partner with others in the sharing of ideas, information and action that ensures better outcomes for all involved

In a healthcare marketplace now expanding its efforts to get at not just the science of healthcare, but the humanity on which it is built, reframing and aligning around a set of core values becomes a fundamental opportunity. As we see efforts now to broaden the conversation, just years ago grounded in clinical checklists alone to now purposefully engaging in not just how patients and families are cared for, but also the fulfillment and well-being of those providing care, we are experiencing a fundamental shift.

I do not believe we ever forgot that this was a caring industry; rather, our caring came in appropriate models. In reframing our efforts around shared values – on a sense of openness and a mindset of abundance; on the capacity of agility, not just a willingness to change; on the acknowledgement that the status quo leaves us slipping behind in the face of a world of innovation; that all voices matter and must be sought with intention; and that in a world of value, competition is now driven in how we execute and in the sharing, not in the secreting of ideas – we are setting a foundation for perhaps one of the most revolutionary periods in healthcare. A focus on experience, on what it represents and the values on which it is built is not a soft idea. Rather it is the bedrock on which the best in outcomes will be built for years to come. It is quality, safety and service, it is cost and the health of our populations globally, it is about the well-being of those delivering care and it is represented in an integrated perspective of bringing ideas together. That is the opportunity we have been presented with today. Our choice now is a simple one: take the first step and act.

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  collaboration  community  foundation  Patient Experience 

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Community Matters in Patient Experience

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Tuesday, October 13, 2015

Earlier this year at Patient Experience Conference we introduced our latest video, What really matters in Patient Experience?, which called us, through the voices of patients and family members, to consider "all voices matter”, "every interaction matters” and "you matter” in patient experience performance. The subtle message in this video was that for as much as there is clear and recognized individuality in each patient experience story, the needs identified and the outcomes achieved, there are also strong and important commonalities of which we should be aware and on which we must be ready to act.

This same consideration of the value of individuality, yet the power of commonality has arisen with the recent emergence of special interest communities in The Beryl Institute. These groups of individuals focus on key areas of healthcare including patient advocacy, physicians, pediatrics and now patient and family advisors, represent an interesting and critical dichotomy and a balancing we see is needed as we address patient experience. In fact we are encouraged by the interest from all corners of the community to look at other opportunities of focus, such as behavioral health, emergency departments, post acute care, home health and others.

It is clear then that there is a definitive need, one asked for by members of The Beryl Institute, in focusing conversations around shared and special interests. This provides an important opportunity for learning, the collection and dissemination of ideas and the connection among peers. Yet we must also be aware that in doing this, we run the risk of missing opportunities for broader learning and collective focus. While we believe and fully support these independent conversations for all they represent, we too reinforce that there is power in the greater community in which these groups exist. More importantly we cannot lose sight of the opportunity for these communities to learn and share with one another, cross fertilize ideas and grow stronger together as a result.

This idea of creating distinction, or as often seen in healthcare, the delineation of our work in silos, provides us an opportunity to seize, especially as it related to the idea of patient experience. While we might distinguish our efforts and even establish infrastructure and resources in areas such as quality, safety, and service, we too must recognize that these investments collectively are part of our overall experience effort. The question we then should ask, is how are we framing our broader investment in experience excellence overall.

Our recent State of Patient Experience Benchmarking Study revealed that people identified clinical outcomes as the top result of effective experience efforts. This trumped consumer loyalty, customer service and others. Outcomes are what we strive for in healthcare – be they healing and recovery or managing the remaining days of life or be they financial imperatives to create a healthy, vibrant and sustained system of healthcare services. This is the very opportunity we then have in creating alignment among our efforts; weaving together quality, safety, and service, a focus on cost and outcomes, honoring the individuality of all we care for and serve while finding strength in our common actions and purpose; identifying special areas of interest and learning, while striving for collective understanding.

These ideas all come down to one core idea – community matters. In the bringing together of ideas or functions, we do two things – honor and address individual needs, while strengthening our collective stand. This captures the unspoken essence of patient experience itself. As we learned from the voices of the patient and family members so gracious in sharing their stories, while each unique, they too have common desires – to have voice, to be heard, to be treated with dignity and respect, to feel compassion and to receive clinical expertise, to be understood and cared for.

As no two people and in the same light, no two healthcare organizations can or should be alike. We must respect that distinction, while honoring all that brings us together. In balancing this intention in every encounter and every moment we create the opportunity for the best interactions and the most positive of experience. Community matters in patient experience and we must ensure it does for the power of the collection of voices in our movement and in the work it calls us to do every day. We must remain vigilant in ensuring the critical balance of individuality and community. In doing so, we reinforce our call to action - we are all the patient experience.

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  collaboration  community  patient experience  voice 

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A Research Agenda for Patient Experience Excellence

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Tuesday, September 1, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, September 1, 2015

As we continue our work at The Beryl Institute in moving the patient experience conversation from one at the fringes of healthcare just a few years ago to a central discussion point in healthcare globally today, we remain committed to developing a true field of practice for this work. This idea, of building a field and framing a profession, requires some fundamental cornerstones be put in place. This includes a professional community from which ideas are percolated and connections are made, a foundational and widely supported body of knowledge that drives professional alignment, a process for identifying and certifying those formal professionals in the field and a solid grounding in research from both an academic and practitioner perspective.

The community is represented by the over 35,000 of you around the world actively involved in accessing and engaging with resources of The Beryl Institute. The Body of Knowledge continues to find great value and expanding reach now through not only a conceptual framework, but also 15 full courses and the ability to achieve certificates of completion for coursework in Patient Experience Leadership and Patient Advocacy. Formal certification is now available through The Beryl Institute’s sister organization – Patient Experience Institute (PXI) – with the inaugural offering of the Certified Patient Experience Professional exam later this year. The first class of CPXPs, our profession’s pioneers, will be announced early next year. All of these efforts have been born from the contributions of hundreds of voices across our global community.

The last cornerstone builds on this idea of community contribution. It is a focus on rigorous research, and the importance of expanding the research agenda for patient experience. This has been building over the 5-year history of The Beryl Institute; first with the establishment of the Patient Experience Grant Program in June of 2010 (applications for the 2015 Grant and Scholar programs are open now), followed by the launch of the open access, peer-reviewed, Patient Experience Journal (PXJ) in April of 2014 (the next call for submissions closes January 2016), and lastly through PXI’s expanding philanthropic outreach to establish even greater support of research efforts (opportunities to donate will soon be available).

This type of reflective thinking, is seen in such government-supported programs as the groundbreaking comparative effectiveness work found at The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), whose mandate is specifically "to improve the quality and relevance of evidence available to help patients, caregivers, clinicians, employers, insurers, and policy makers make informed health decisions.” It is also seen in many of the recent efforts supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, and their focus on patient and family engagement.

And while there are even other efforts taking place, I still believe we have a significant opportunity to tackle the real tangible nature of the human experience in healthcare itself. The essence of these opportunities is reflected in the patient experience grants, in recent journal articles found in PXJ and elsewhere. When I look to the definition of patient experience itself and the simple, yet intricate nature of the key concepts such as interactions, organization culture, perceptions and cross continuum issues, all linked to outcomes and driven by safe, quality-focused, high reliability, service-driven efforts, there are incredible variables to explore at each point on the continuum of care and across all segments of the healthcare experience. This reaches from chronic illnesses to primary care encounters, long-term residential issues to rural settings or underserved populations. Underlying it all is the nature of human dignity and respect we all know is central to providing the best in healthcare overall.

To drive these ideas, we need to continue to frame, refresh and execute on a robust, thoughtful and I dare say edgy research agenda for patient experience. This is not research to just validate the usefulness of new solutions, but rigorous explorations of what practices, processes, systems, behaviors, communication styles, engagement efforts, tactics and tools not only show promise, but lead to lasting and sustained positive outcomes.

I ask you as the patient experience community what it is that we need to be asking, exploring and proving on we move forward. Are there practices you have taken for granted we could test? How can we explore key elements of the Guiding Principles for Patient Experience Excellence and determine which have the greatest impact, what that looks like and where we should focus our efforts first? How can you partner with your own vendors and resource providers to test new solutions? Or perhaps I will push you even further…how can we as a community come together to provide global insights into many other questions. Our biennial Benchmarking Study represents the kind of opportunity we have at hand to explore ideas both locally and around the world in identifying new concepts that can and should push our thinking in the realm of patient experience overall.

If we are to continue our endeavor in not just shaping, but solidifying and expanding a true field of practice and a profession that can positively influence outcomes for years to come, what questions should we be asking? What should we include in our PX research agenda? I look forward to your thoughts and commit to pulling together these ideas so we can collectively engage and continue to push the patient experience movement forward together. We now just need the right questions to ask.

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  collaboration  community  global  patient experience  research 

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Patient Experience: From Evidence-Based to Proven Practice

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Tuesday, July 7, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, July 7, 2015

The conversation on how we both measure and show the value of patient experience continues to grow. With the emergence of systems such as the Center for Medicare and Medicaid services (CMS) 5-star rating systems in the US and other performance measures coming online in countries around the world, healthcare organizations, and the people that use them daily, are struggling to identify measures with meaning. Adding clarity to this conversation has been central to our efforts at The Beryl Institute. 

Healthcare, as a scientifically grounded industry, has had its roots in evidence. This has driven our quality conversations and more so outcomes-based focus for most of its history. In all we have done to cure humanity, we often overlooked the very humans in our midst. My grandfather, a pediatrician himself, used to note that "bedside manner” was not just a part of the job, but rather the way we "treated” people as people, not just treated them as patients, mattered most.

This is why I believe we need to move beyond just evidenced-based, which is driven in the scientific mindset, to proven practice, which is about driving outcomes through doing. I am not suggesting that scientific exploration is a bad idea, just that it cannot be the only way in which we generate, share and disseminate new practice and the opportunity for expanded outcomes.

For this reason, we have built The Beryl Institute as a global community of practice. Sharing efforts that people put in place that not only sound good, but also do good things is critical in our work in patient experience. This level of flexibility provides for the open-minded creativity necessary to drive better results in the highly variable world we live in. Healthcare as a field should be first and foremost about human beings working for the betterment of human beings.

For that reason we launched Patient Experience Journal (PXJ), as a scholar-practitioner outlet to both share rigorous research and leading practices backed up by strong data. By showing what works in practice and sharing it, we can collectively become stronger in our efforts. (Note: The next submission deadline for PXJ is July 31, 2015). For this reason we also created the Patient Experience Grant and Scholar programs. Through these small, but significant grant opportunities, we are supporting exploration on the front lines of experience, leading to new, interesting and innovative solutions that can be replicated in practice.

Lastly, we have found one of the greatest gathering grounds for sharing proven practice in patient experience has become Patient Experience Conference. Now 5 years old, PX Conference brings together over 50 sessions exemplifying the best in practice and ideas and positive impact and measurable outcomes are shared. Not only through these direct learning sessions, but also via personal interactions and networking, people in the experience community are helping to seed and spread practices that can touch the lives of so many in healthcare around the world. (Note: Patient Experience Conference 2016 will be held April 13-15, 2016 in Dallas, TX. Call for presentations is open through July 17, 2015).

The point being here, that if we share the belief that experience is grounded at the point of interaction between one human being and another, we MUST drive the conversation beyond evidence to proven practice – what works in that moment of interaction and leads to the positive, strong and lasting outcomes. If we are to collectively impact proven practice, consider the following:

  1. Outline your process. Capture the process you are putting in place. This helps create institutional memory and replicable practice. What process did you put in place? What resources did it require? Who was involved and what time did it take?
  2. Test your practice. Yes this is where experimentation must come into play, but beyond theory to practice. Proven practice is much more than best practice. It must be shown – proven – to work.
  3. Document your results. Make sure you write up your findings. What worked, what didn't? What were the key lessons learned? What recommendations do you have for others?
  4. Share your findings. Consider avenues to share your information. The power of proven practices is not just the impact they have for your organization, but how they can bring value to others. Consider outlets such as PXJ, Patient Experience Conference, Institute Case Studies and others to share your story and results.

The power of our patient experience community has always been in the space it has provided all of us to share and learn. The key is that we move beyond theory, to where practice is having an impact and driving positive outcomes. The value of what we do together in creating a growing library of ideas is truly the foundation of what patient experience is about. Through our collective voices great things can and do happen… I invite you to contribute.

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  collaboration  community of practice  outcomes  patient experience 

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Collaboration key to driving patient experience excellence

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Tuesday, November 4, 2014
Updated: Tuesday, November 4, 2014

One underlying and powerful philosophy has driven all the work we have done at The Beryl Institute in the last four years. It is through the collective voices comprising our global community of practice that we generate ideas, learn and share with others. Through this collaboration both within the community and with others committed to this critical cause – the patient experience movement is supported, nourished, and will continue to thrive.

I have yet to see in any environment, the ability to achieve AND sustain success without a sense of alignment, collaboration and shared purpose. Organizations intent of fostering deep-rooted silos (or simply allowing them to exist) tend to reinforce battles for scarce resources and the pulling at an organization’s seams. In a movement as delicate and important as providing the best in experience for the patients, families and communities we serve, while also caring for each other delivering care, we must work in a much different way. I do not suggest competition is bad, in that it motivates innovation, expediency and progress, but rather that we must look to collaboration as a central capacity we should search for in our own organizations and those we choose to work with as we address patient experience excellence.

We have worked hard to model and encourage this through our work at The Beryl Institute. Our efforts have worked to bring disparate voices and perspectives together, such as our "voices” paper series that even included a paper with many competing survey vendors in one publication. It has been seen in the various research we have conducted, events we have produced, learning we have developed and organizations we have worked to engage with or support.

The Patient Experience Body of Knowledge itself was developed by over 400 voices and included the engagement of central partners and experts in the experience effort such as the Institute for Patient- and Family-Centered Care (IPFCC) and others. We have worked with the American Hospital Association to ensure patient advocates still had a professional home to continue expanding their rich history. We are expanding our engagement with key players in the physician practice and long-term care arenas to reinforce the fact that experience crosses the continuum of care.

From the collective voices that helped frame the very definition of patient experience, to our recognition that all voices matter on the experience conversation, we have worked to engage experience leaders and executives to front line staff, patients and families to resource providers, journalists to academic researchers. Our purpose is to not only encourage, but also model collaboration. We do this for the greater good of the movement and as an opportunity for all to consider in driving experience excellence.

If we are to continue to push the patient experience conversation forward, it will take the aligned efforts of many to frame, reinforce and progress the effort. It will take a reinforcement of the very values that have driven our work to date. You can consider the same as an opportunity in your own organization as you work towards collaborative success in impacting your patient experience efforts.

  • Ensure clarity of what it is you are trying to achieve. I maintain that definition and a clear purpose that is understood and shared by all is central to any patient experience success.
  • Find alignment in your efforts. What are the common causes you are looking to address? All too often we let competing interests shadow central needs that will benefit our organization and desired outcomes. Find points of purposeful action and move forward.
  • Actively engage all voices. Beyond simply creating the space for inclusion, is actively seeking, inviting, respecting and integrating all voices that may influence your work. There are multidimensional and broad reaching perspectives that impact experience excellence and we are best served by hearing them all.

While these values in action are fundamental to success, the most important thing we can do in addressing experience excellence is to take action itself. We must be mindful not to let the desire for or enactment of collaboration become the reason for inaction. It should and must become a means by which we all move forward on this issue together.

Collaboration in patient experience excellence is a local issue, one that must be managed by each organization striving for success. It also is a critical systemic opportunity. For in finding the strength of collaboration among organizations and ideas, we can support clarity, purpose and shared action that will ensure a strong and lasting focus on the experience of patients, residents, families and each other for many years to come. This may be healthcare’s strongest prescription for excellence. It is our job, together, to see it through.

Jason A. Wolf
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  collaboration  culture  engagement  healthcare  Patient Experience 

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