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The Beryl Institute Patient Experience Blog
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The Patient Experience Deserves More Than 63%

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, February 4, 2014

I have yet to meet anyone in healthcare who suggests patient experience is not important. In fact, I often hear it said to be "one of our top priorities”, "a central pillar in our strategy” or "a critical initiative for our organization”. I do not question the sincerity of these declarations or the intent they suggest. I also recognize in the highly dynamic world of healthcare today we are in a constant struggle to balance our priorities. With that, I offer these thoughts to shift our thinking in how we approach experience overall.

To frame what I mean about patient experience I return to the definitiongenerated by the members of The Beryl Institute community – the sum of all interactions, shaped by an organization’s culture, that influence patient perceptions across the continuum of care. I also want to challenge the perspective of some in equating patient experience only to service and question our inside-out focus in healthcare as we often operationally differentiate quality, safety and service. While we may operate these efforts in distinct and at times competing manners, I do not believe patients distinguish between these areas. Yes, we must focus on quality, safety and service and align the appropriate resources to each, but we must address these efforts from the eyes of our consumer and the perspective that they together create but one experience.

As I have continued to hear patient experience identified as a strategic priority, it has caused me to ask, does this mean based on needs there are then specific times when we actually focus on it (and therefore times we don't). That is, do we truly focus on every one of our priorities at all times? Continuing this thought, if patient experience is seen as an initiative, it has all but been declared a limited effort, for every initiative I have experienced in healthcare and elsewhere has a beginning, middle and therefore an end. Do we truly think the patient experience is an idea where the effort eventually concludes?

These ideas around alignment, priority and initiative were supported in the findings of the 2013 Benchmarking Study, The State of Patient Experience in American Hospitals. The research revealed something one could potentially overlook in all that was uncovered. In the U.S. Hospital System the individual with primary responsibility for patient experience spends 63% of their time on these efforts. In contrast, I do not know of a CFO that spends 63% of his time on finances. The data itself reinforces the opportunity we may very well be missing. Have we made patient experience a 63% priority? If we take that to the extreme, does that mean it is only something we consider for 63 out of every 100 patients we see? I do not believe any organization or leader has done this intentionally, but it does cause us to hopefully stop and think about how we lead and operate our organizations and systems.

I know those in healthcare are more committed than what the number reveals. We are an industry of caring and compassionate people who give all they can in every moment. But the data opens our eyes to the opportunities we have. Perhaps what we have lost in our efforts to address patient experience is our realization that experience is all we are about in healthcare. I know that if any one of us were laying on an exam table, recovering in a bed, or sitting holding the hand of a family member that we would not expect anything less than 100%. In fact I believe we would say we want the best in quality, safety and service – the best experience – in every encounter. I believe we all do want the best in patient experience for all those in our care. I hope we too agree the patient experience deserves more than 63%. So how can we start to do things differently today? I look forward to your thoughts.

Jason. A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Metrics and Measurement.

Tags:  bottom line  change  choice  Continuum of Care  culture  defining patient experience  expectations  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interactions  partnership  Patient Experience  priorities  quality  safety  service  service excellence  strategy 

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Patients are Partners in Experience, Not Just Recipients of One

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Thursday, June 6, 2013
Updated: Thursday, June 6, 2013

In my most recent Hospital Impact blog I noted that "how” we choose to do things in healthcare will and should trump the "what”. This is supported by my travels through numerous healthcare organizations where it is becoming evident that the core practices organizations are using to drive patient experience success are more and more consistent. While some might see this as limiting, I see it as encouraging.

Why is that? It means we are listening to one another, learning from each other and showing an incredible willingness to "steal ideas shamelessly” as a well respected CEO once shared with me in describing a component of their organizational success. That means the ‘what’ we do is not very different location to location. The distinguishing characteristic in experience is not the things you do, but the way in which your deliver. This is at the core of the very definition of patient experience as "the sum of all interactions, shaped by an organization’s culture”.

This ability to listen and learn from one another is a central value of all we do at The Beryl Institute. As a global community of practice we can (and must) learn from all edges of the community – those Institutions rated the "best” or seen as the "biggest” do not represent the only expertise. Rather it is in trying and executing of ideas in organizations of all shapes, sizes and focus through which excellence is supported and shared. It is based on this premise that the idea of a broad and inclusive range of voices has been so central to our work.

In returning to the conversation of "how”, I reflect on the recent conversations I had with 18 incredible patient and family advocates committed to the work of improving quality, safety and service for patients and families around the world in preparing the most recent paper from The Beryl Institute – Voices of Patients and Families: Partners in the Patient Experience. The stories these individual’s shared of compassion personified and at times the uglier side of care help us realize that there is power in how we choose to manage the interactions we have in healthcare every day. That it is truly more than the tactics, and rather the execution that matters.

The point I make here is all the tactics in the world amount to very little if all they are is something we do TO people in our care. The old language of provider and recipient may well still be used in healthcare, but its use is outdated and indicative of a system in need of change. Patients – yes, you and I, our children and parents, family and friends – are active parts of the healthcare equation, not passive recipients of it. We need to ensure we start acting this way. This perspective is exemplified through the work of such great organizations as the Society for Participatory Medicine.

While there are countless lessons shared by the individuals interviewed in the Voices paper, we inherently know many of them ourselves. Our contributors helped frame three central ideas in ensuring partnership in the care environment:

1. Acknowledge patients are not subjects in the healthcare process or "something” you should talk about or plan for in third person.

2. Recognize patients are not necessarily wired to actively engage in the healthcare process, due both to the complexity of healthcare and the nature of the system itself (that potentially diminishes the role of the patient in an unspoken hierarchy of expertise). You must ask, encourage, and act on the patient’s voice.

3. Consider coordinating efforts to identify and incorporate patient perceptions into the overall planning of care.

Personally, as I continue the journey of new fatherhood, I saw this play out in the very interactions we have had with our pediatrician. At our stage as new parents, we could be scolded, challenged or even talked down to about how we handle situations. Instead our doc engages us based on our questions, our hopes and fears. I know she is getting all the needed clinical work done, but she is including us as patients and family, as partners in the process. This is an active decision on her part, it is one that engages us in the care of our son and ensures a positive experience with every visit. "How” is a choice we can all make in healthcare and is one I believe will make all the difference.

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Patient & Family Centeredness.

Tags:  bottom line  choice  culture  defining patient experience  employee engagement  expectations  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  Interactions  partnership  patient engagement  Patient Experience  patient stories  service excellence 

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Organizational Culture: A Critical Choice at the Heart of an Exceptional Patient Experience

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Monday, September 3, 2012
Updated: Saturday, September 1, 2012

The Beryl Institute defines patient experience as the sum of all interactions, shaped by an organization’s culture, that influence patient perceptions across the continuum of care. While healthcare organizations may not be able to directly control the perceptions of patients and families, the opportunity to influence these perceptions is grounded in their very culture. I suggest that culture is fundamentally based on the choices an organization makes.

When I first explored the characteristics of high performing organizations in healthcare, "seven simple truths” emerged that were tied to positive outcomes. They represented committed choices of action in the organizations studied. These truths included:

  • Visionary leadership
  • Consistent and effective communication
  • Selecting for fit and ongoing development of staff
  • Agile and open culture
  • Central focus on service
  • Constant recognition and broad community outreach
  • Solid physician/clinical relationships

It was this combination of efforts that helped organizations drive exceptional outcomes in experience, engagement, quality and the bottom-line. These characteristics have continued to emerge during my exploration of what is driving patient experience success in healthcare organizations around the world.

As recently as my last two On the Road visits, with St. David’s Healthcare and Scripps Health, the central role of culture in patient experience efforts was reinforced. In the St. David’s system, at the core of the process for reinforcing system-wide values and focus on exceptional experience are three questions. They ask daily how staff will define, live and manage the culture. The recognition at St. David’s is that the experience tactics you implement are only as effective as the foundation of culture on which they are built.

This was also the case at Scripps Health, where they recognized the very nature of the organization has a significant impact on overall experience. Vic Buzachero, Scripps Health’s Corporate Senior Vice President for Innovation, Human Resources and Performance Management shared, "It is important that we build a culture that drives consistency in our effort. We must have the infrastructure to show the genuine nature of our organization, reinforce our focus on the patient and shape the balance of systems, processes and behaviors that will help us realize our goals.”

This is not just a U.S.-based phenomenon. My visit to the NHS in the United Kingdom reinforced the importance of culture to experience. They created an opportunity for patients, family and community members to interact directly with senior leadership and initiated processes that improved communication and understanding of patient’s needs. They also focused on creating happy and engaged staff to ensure happy patients.

This idea is reinforced by recent research conducted by Britt Berrett and Paul Spiegelman. They suggest in any business, and especially healthcare, you can’t take care of customers if you don’t take care of employees. The realization, as we saw exemplified in the cases above, is that to ensure the best experience and focus on patients and families, there must also be an intentional focus and effort to create employee engagement and loyalty. Again, this is driven by the culture of an organization. (They offer a complimentary survey in which you can gauge your own organization’s culture of engagement).

Through all our explorations at The Beryl Institute into what drives the best in experience there has always been an element of those simple organizational truths above, all which represent a commitment to creating a culture of service. Simply putting tactics in place has you run the risk of turning your patient experience efforts into the latest flavor of the month activity. Patients and their families and, yes, your colleagues and employees deserve much more. To truly drive an exceptional patient experience, you can only influence perceptions through the choices you make. One of the most critical of those being the type of organizational culture you choose to create.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
Executive Director
The Beryl Institute

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Organizational Effectiveness.

Tags:  bottom line  CIQ  culture  defining patient experience  Employee EN  improving patient experience  Leadership  Patient Experience  Scripps Health  St. David's Healthcare 

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The Power of Celebration: A Simple Secret in Improving The Patient Experience

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, June 5, 2012
Updated: Monday, June 4, 2012

Last week I had the privilege of attending an award ceremony designed to recognize the accomplishments of healthcare organizations for performance on patient experience measures, HCAHPS scores and service innovations. The recipients came from across the spectrum of care settings including acute care, critical access, physician practices, outpatient and home health. I have attended a number of events like this in the past and have always been moved by the enthusiasm and excitement generated by this type of recognition. Yet at this event, I was struck by something I may have been missing all along.

Whether a large national event of this type or a recognition event in a single healthcare organization, what I discovered is that there is something significant hiding just beyond our efforts at recognition. Recognition is a powerful tool in organizational settings. It has been shown to bolster engagement of staff, increase satisfaction and even boost motivation. Yet, what I suggest is often missed is taking one more step beyond acknowledgement and recognition. It is a magic opportunity we often fall short of in healthcare, the power of celebration.

I am not talking about hanging a sign on a unit to say congratulations for a performance achievement or even singing happy birthday at monthly staff forums. All these activities are important, but remain the rational part of creating cultures of engagement. One could argue these are celebrations, and while I would not disagree, they seem more often to be a thoughtful acknowledgement of accomplishment. By celebration I also don't suggest the need for costly or even lavish events, I am talking about the emotional connection we have to our success. Celebration is not a certificate or sign, it is the true expression of appreciation from the heart and shared with colleagues and peers.

So how can you use celebration? It may be the attendance of a senior leader at a unit huddle to express why the service efforts of a staff member had a positive impact on the experience of a patient or family member. It could be bringing the prom or an anniversary or birthday party to a patient’s room. It could be a red carpet welcome in the lobby for a volunteer on her 20 years of service or a thoughtful send off for a long time patient who healed and is now leaving your facility. So how do you know that you are celebrating versus recognizing? You feel it on the inside. Versus a virtual handshake, it is a virtual hug. Recognition is something you do; it is rational and thoughtful. Celebration is something you experience; it is emotional and heart-felt.

In a work environment where stress can run high and emotion sits just below (and at times above) the surface in every encounter, by moving beyond recognition (not leaving it behind) and ensuring true celebration, we intentionally provide an experience for our team, our patients, our families and our communities. The reality is they are having an experience whether we design one or not. In celebration we create lasting memories, the very essence of experience itself – that which is remembered. In doing so we unleash the potential of our people, acknowledge the humanity of our patients and allow the true purpose and passion in our work to emerge. Through celebration we enliven and enrich our organizations and we create new opportunities to positively impact the patient experience.

At The Beryl Institute we work tirelessly to ensure we celebrate the amazing work taking place in healthcare every day. I invite you to share your story. How do use celebration to enliven the patient experience in your organization? Provide your comments below.

Jason A. Wolf
Executive Director
The Beryl Institute

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Employee Engagement.

Tags:  bottom line  celebration  culture  improving patient experience  Patient Experience  recognition  service excellence 

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Loyalty – The True Reward for Unparalleled Patient Experience

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, April 3, 2012
Updated: Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Last week I had the opportunity to attend a conference on Healthcare Experience Design. This is an incredibly important part of the work in providing a positive patient experience. In fact, experience design has been identified as one of the fourteen core domains in the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge (Have youprovided your input yet?). The element of design focuses on possibility, not problems. I believe we need to ensure patient experience overall has that same intention.

The well-known design firm IDEO reinforces these principles in the way they work with partner organizations. They describe this as design thinking, "a deeply human process that taps into abilities we all have but get overlooked by more conventional problem-solving practices.” This is a powerful statement in that patient experience in many ways is just that, the ability to move beyond problems to something more meaningful, and beyond standard processes, to those that have real and lasting impact. In this shift from a problem solving to a design mindset, the potential power of a positive patient experience is unleashed.

This idea was reinforced by Gary Hirshberg, President and CE-Yo of Stonyfield Farm, who talked about the potential intersection of design and business function. He shared that while some organizations manage their priorities to reduce production costs and then direct significant dollars towards promotion and advertising, there is another opportunity. If we invest in our products and services to ensure the greatest quality experience, we can change the equation. This shift in focus is from one of awareness through advertising to one of attraction and engagement through loyalty. Hirshberg reinforced that you get to loyalty by doing what is right for your consumer, not by telling them how great you are. As I listened to this argument in the consumer product world, I found myself thinking about how this applies to healthcare.

In an era where patients and family members are becoming more consumer-savvy and the system is set up to provide for greater ways to actually comparison shop in the healthcare marketplace, how has healthcare responded? Have efforts in healthcare focused on awareness through advertising and promotion or have opportunities for loyalty been created and sustained? Has a system been built based on solving the problem of driving healthcare volume or has the industry shifted to the thoughts of possibility in designing for an unparalleled experience?

It is clear in healthcare reputation carries great weight, but how that reputation is presented also has an impact. Advertisements for awards, recognitions or even wait times can only carry an organization so far. They are the perceived, not lived experience. Rather it is in designing and enacting the actual experience through which reputation is solidified and loyalty gained. This suggests the importance of investing in what it takes to ensure the best patient experience versus simply the messages to convey value. In doing so the conversation shifts from awareness which will need to reinforced again and again via the next print ad, billboard or TV spot, to that of experience that will reach well beyond the walls of a facility or practice, through the words of those that have walked your halls, engaged with your staff and had the chance to be impacted by the experience overall. Loyalty does come by doing right. This is making the right investments in your overall patient experience. In doing so you move beyond solving the problems for your organization and instead reinforce what is possible for your patients, their families and your team.

Jason A. Wolf
Executive Director
The Beryl Institute

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Metrics and Measurement.

Tags:  body of knowledge  bottom line  culture  improving patient experience  leadership  marketing  Patient Experience  return on service  service excellence  team 

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Your Patient Experience Priority for 2012 May Be as Simple as Taking the First Step

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Wednesday, January 4, 2012
Updated: Wednesday, January 4, 2012

With all the predictions of new healthcare trends and the expanding requirements being placed on healthcare providers, one thing holds true – at the center of all these efforts and initiatives lies the patient. This is not patient-centeredness in the traditional sense of simply the care setting, but it is now clear that whether you are ready or not, the patient has taken center stage in our healthcare system.

For some, the patient experience was the fundamental driver of their efforts well before any requirements were raised; providing the greatest service and highest quality outcomes for the patients and families served at every touch point. Others have found new initiative in addressing patient experience with expanding financial implications. Yet many still struggle with where to focus, what to do or even if to act.

The harsh reality is that as of today over two-thirds of the initial performance period for Value-Based Purchasing is now in the books. With a closing date of March 31, 2012 and then the reality that reimbursements will be impacted just six months later, this is not the time to get stuck in a state of confusion. If you are not already moving, you still have time to act.

I have been asked by many healthcare leaders for the secret to the "best” patient experience. And while I will be the first to say I do not believe there is one specific formula that leads to patient experience success, I have offered a few considerations. In my recent blog with Hospital Impact, I reiterated the importance of four central strategies:

1. A clear organizational definition for patient experience.

2. A focused role to support patient experience efforts.

3. A recognition that patient experience is more than just a survey.

4. A commitment at the highest levels of leadership.

These suggestions are not complicated initiatives, but rather they should be a simple choice.

In every instance of high performance in patient experience what I observed above all else is that willingness to make a choice. For some it was a broad strategic effort where patient satisfaction was a key measure in performance compensation. For others it was finding that one area where they could begin to move the needle – creating a more quiet and relaxing environment, rounding with intention and empathy to ensure a patient and their family felt attended to, or simply communicating consistently that they were taking every action possible to ensure their patient’s pain was managed. I have suggested and will reassert here that excellence in patient experience emerges in the ability to balance its need to be a strategic imperative with clear measurable, tangible, and yes tactical action.

Most importantly, as my grandfather so wisely shared with me years ago, the more complicated we choose to make things, the more difficult they seem to accomplish. Patient experience is a critical issue, with increasing demands and pressures intertwined with a passion for care and an understanding that it is the right thing to do. This does not mean we need to make it bigger than we can handle. Or even that we need be discouraged if we have finally been able to make it a priority after others may seem "so far ahead”. The reality is that whenever and wherever you start is the right time and place if the intention is right and true. Now you have the choice, one as simple as committing to take that first step. My hope is that each of us, in every healthcare setting, has resolved to do something to improve the patient experience in 2012.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
Executive Director
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  bottom line  culture  defining patient experience  improving patient experience  Interaction  Patient Experience  service excellence  value-based purchasing 

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The Power of Interaction: You are the Patient Experience

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, December 6, 2011
Updated: Tuesday, December 6, 2011

In looking back at 2011, I have touched on a cross-section of topics on the patient experience – from service excellence andanticipation to value-based purchasing and bottom line impact. This year has led us to heightened awareness of the impact performance scores will have on dollars realized and increasing recognition that the patient experience is a priority with staying power. The Beryl Institute’s benchmarking study, The State of Patient Experience in American Hospitals, revealed both the great intentions and significant challenges that are at hand in addressing the critical issue of patient experience.

Our research supports, and I fundamentally believe, that there is a need for a dedicated and focused patient experience leader in every healthcare organization. Yet in the midst of all this attention, we may have overlooked the most important component – the immense power, significant impact and immeasurable value of a single interaction.

What does this mean? Interaction is simply defined as a mutual or reciprocal action or influence. The key is mutual action; something that occurs directly between two individuals. No interaction is the same, but it requires a choice by both parties to engage and respond as they best see fit. In healthcare settings, be it hospitals, medical offices, surgery centers or outpatient clinics, there are countless interactions every day. The question is: are they taken for granted as situations that just occur or are they seen as significant opportunities to impact experience? Perhaps in thinking about experience as a bigger issue, the importance of these moments of personal relationship has been missed.

What this means for improving the patient experience may be simple. Rather than waiting for that one leader to build the right plan or for your culture to develop in just the right way, you each instead recognize one key fact – you are the patient experience. I acknowledge there is a need for a strong leader and a solid cultural foundation on which to build, but at its core patient experience is about what each and every individual chooses to do at the most intimate moment of interaction. If these moments are used as the building blocks to achieve our greatest of intentions, patient experience will be the better for it. As you look to next year, whether you sweep the floors or sit in the c-suite, the choice should be clear. In today’s chaotic world of healthcare, the greatest moment of impact may be in the smallest of encounters. It is here that the most significant successes be they for scores, dollars or care will be realized. Happy holidays to you all!

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
Executive Director
The Beryl Institute
 

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Organizational Effectiveness.

Tags:  bottom line  Continuum of Care  culture  defining patient experience  HCAHPS  improving patient experience  Interaction  Patient Experience  return on service  service anticipation  service excellence  service recovery  value-based purchasing 

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The Smart Thing to Do: Patient Experience and the Bottom Line

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, November 1, 2011
Updated: Tuesday, November 1, 2011
Most now agree that patient experience is not just a nice to do, it is a must do. The idea of patient experience has recently taken on greater significance, first, through the emergence of surveys such as HCAHPS that make performance transparent and followed by the reality that reimbursement dollars, performance pay and compensation are being tied to outcomes through policy being implemented around the world. Improving the patient experience is also what is right to do. It is about providing the type of care experience for patients and families that you would want for yourself and your loved ones.

But recognizing patient experience as both a must do and a right to do, is not enough. It should also be addressed as the smart thing to do. Why? The patient experience has true financial implications for healthcare organizations that reach well beyond regulations. With all that is done to address patient experience from the cultural, organizational and process sides, we also need to consider its financial implications. This is perhaps the area that patient experience champions have focused on the least, but could have the most significant impact in making the case for the important work being done.

Patient experience influences the performance of healthcare organizations on a number of fronts. In The Beryl Institute’s newest white paper, Return on Service: The Financial Impact of Patient Experience, three perspectives are suggested as we look at the bottom line impact of the patient experience: financial, marketing and clinical.

  • From the financial perspective, it has been shown that satisfied patients lead to higher profitability. In a 2008 J.D. Power study, it was discovered that hospitals scoring in the top quartile in satisfaction had over two times the margin of those at the bottom. These findings were supported by the 2008 Press Ganey paper, Return on Investment: Increasing Profitability by Improving Patient Satisfaction. The paper revealed that when hospitals were ranked by profitability into quartiles, the most profitable hospitals had the highest average satisfaction scores.
  • From the marketing perspective, we need to look no further than the power of word of mouth. In her 2004 article, Jacqueline Zimowski shared that a satisfied patient tells three other people about a positive experience. In contrast, a dissatisfied patient tells up to 25 others about a negative experience. The issue worsens, as for every patient that complains, there are 20 other dissatisfied patients that do not. And of those dissatisfied patients that don’t complain, only 1 in 10 will return. When you run the numbers, for every complaint you hear, you could be losing a potential 18 patients. In essence by not focusing on experience we are potentially driving patients away.
  • From the clinical perspective, we must be clear to recognize that experience and quality are not distinct efforts but critically interwoven aspects of overall care. Patient Experience is not just about pretty or quiet environments, positive service scripting or even consistent rounding. At the end of the day it is about ensuring our patients leave better than when they arrived (as often as we can). This was exemplified in a powerful way in the 2011 study, Relationship Between Patient Satisfaction with Inpatient Care and Hospital Readmission Within 30 Days,reported by Boulding et al. They examined quality factors (as defined by CMS Core Measures, specifically on acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia) and satisfaction factors (as determined by the two HCAHPS questions – How do you rate the hospital overall? and Would you recommend the hospital to friends and family?) in relationship to readmission rates within 30 days of discharge. The finding was surprising. The HCAHPS scores, i.e. experience outcomes, were reliable and even more predictable indicators of readmissions than quality indicators. In essence, patient experience, herein measured by HCAHPS was a distinct and measurable driver of readmissions, a key quality issue and a significant financial issue for healthcare organizations and one taking on even greater interest as it will impact future reimbursements that hospitals are eligible to receive.
As healthcare leaders take on the challenge of patient experience, it is important to recognize that it reaches well beyond simple measures of satisfaction. A commitment to patient experience has significant and measurable impact, not only in doing what is right for the people and communities you serve, but also in ensuring the best quality and most financially sound experience for all who are in and who deliver your care. To be responsible stewards for healthcare systems that are both vital and viable, it is essential to recognize and be willing to address the bottom line issues influenced by patient experience efforts every day. It is the smart thing to do!

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D
Executive Director
The Beryl Institute
 

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Metrics and Measurement.

Tags:  bottom line  culture  FInancial Implications  HCAHPS  improving patient experience  marketing  Patient Experience  press ganey  readmissions  return on service  service excellence  value-based purchasing 

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