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The Beryl Institute Patient Experience Blog
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How Will You Invest in Patient Experience in 2016?

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Tuesday, December 1, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, December 1, 2015

We recently celebrated our first five years as a community of practice and looked back, somewhat in awe, at the incredible growth of this organization over such a short time. The Beryl Institute is now a global community of almost 40,000 individuals passionate about improving the healthcare experience for patients, families and caregivers.

The momentum continues, as does the realization that organizations are making significant investments in time, energy and dollars to ensure they are prepared to deliver the best possible patient experience. We see these investments in many forms from hiring teams to training leaders and staff to building and supporting cultures of excellence.

As we shared in the 2015 State of Patient Experience Benchmarking study, senior patient experience leadership and staff investment is growing with 42% of respondents having a Chief Experience Officer (or comparable position) compared to only 22% two years ago.  Along with that, the size of patient experience teams is growing; 33% of organizations reported having five or more staff members supporting patient experience efforts. 

The Beryl Institute community reflects this trend as well. This year over 200 organizations will invest in institutional membership – meaning they provide unlimited access to the Institute’s white papers, webinars, topic calls, learning bites, etc. to everyone within their facility. They are making a statement that people in ALL roles impact the patient experience and should have access to research and collaboration that will assist their efforts.

We have also seen tremendous interest in learning and professional development programs intended to train patient experience leaders and other staff. We recently increased our virtual classroom offerings in the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge courses to support growing participation in the community-developed program that provides Certificates in Patient Experience Leadership and Patient Advocacy.

Patient Experience Conference had its largest attendance to date this year and we were honored to partner with member organizations to host sold out Regional Roundtable events in San Francisco, Charlotte and Minneapolis. Our community is eager to gain (and share) knowledge and to invest in their personal career growth. In fact, today our sister organization, Patient Experience Institute, will offer the first testing opportunity for those hoping to earn their CPXP, the professional certification for Patient Experience Leaders.

While we’re excited to celebrate the five-year milestone, we acknowledge how much work is still to be done. We imagine (and hope to help inspire) a world where all healthcare organizations appreciate the power and impact of patient experience efforts and make without hesitation the investments necessary to be the best they can be for patients and families.

Earlier this year we released Our Stand, a list of guiding principles we’ve identified in our five years of leading this work that can have significant impact on patient experience success. I share them again as a reminder as you evaluate your own efforts and consider what investment opportunities make sense to support your specific needs.

We believe organizations and systems committed to providing the best in experience WILL:

  • Identify and support accountable leadership with committed time and focused intent to shape and guide experience strategy
  • Establish and reinforce a strong, vibrant and positive organizational culture and all it comprises
  • Develop a formal definition for what experience is to their organization
  • Implement a defined process for continuous patient and family input and engagement
  • Engage all voices in driving comprehensive, systemic and lasting solutions
  • Look beyond clinical experience of care to all interactions and touch points
  • Focus on alignment across all segments of the continuum and the spaces in between
  • Encompass both a focus on healing and a commitment to well-being

As you prepare for the coming year I challenge you to reflect on your organization’s commitment to experience improvement. Where are you exceling and where are your opportunities to do even more for your patients, families, caregivers and staff? Our patient experience community is here to support your journey and I encourage you to take full advantage of the incredible resources and knowledge available. 

Wishing you a wonderful holiday season and a successful New Year!

 

Stacy Palmer
Vice President, Strategy and Member Experience
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  body of knowledge  certification  collaboration  community of practice  Continuum of Care  culture  employee engagement  Field of Patient Experience  global healthcare  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  Interactions  Leadership  Nurse Leadership  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  Regional Roundtable  service excellence 

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We Each Hold a Piece to the Patient Experience Puzzle

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, July 1, 2014
Updated: Tuesday, July 1, 2014

In my most recent Hospital Impact blog I wrote:

Experience is designed to fit your organization and the people in your care. No one provider, no one vendor, no one organization holds the ultimate answer to the experience riddle. The greatest successes I see are those organizations willing to pull from the best of all they can, across all the information available, to meet their unique needs. In proceeding, choose partners and resources that value and integrate your own organizational identity in any plan. That will take you the farthest down the path to experience success.

As I further reflected on those words, I was quick to see and acknowledge a bias I bring to this work. Over the last four years in growing the Institute and through the many years of my career before, I have come to not only value, but also see the true impact that collaboration and the sharing of ideas can have in helping "raise all boats.” Yes, collaboration in organizational life is designed to collectively "raise the tide”. It is something I have often seen a lack of in the competitive landscape of healthcare overall.

I am not saying I do not believe that competition is of value, drives creativity, resourcefulness and positive outcomes; in fact I have seen it do just that. Rather, competition in the critical areas of organizational life, particularly in healthcare and specifically in the experience we provide for patients, their families and our very own staff members is not the greatest path to success. Without question, competition has been a motivating factor in experience, one seen driving action as scores are publicly reported and actual reimbursements and other financial opportunities are at stake. This is of value as the attention given to positive experience leads to better outcomes and holds the potential for establishing significant market distinction.

Yet, what I suggest is that beyond this drive for distinction, the opportunity to learn from one another provides the greatest of potential outcomes for all. The challenge is not (nor should it be) around what to do, but rather your actual commitment to do something about it. I have not visited one organization or engaged with one audience yet that did not already inherently understand the fundamentals to success in driving the best in experience. (Note in discussing experience, I maintain it is the integration of quality, safety and service encounters.) The distinguishing factor I have continued to see is leadership vision and commitment, a willingness to invest and follow through, the right people focused on the right things and the openness to reach out, share successes and learn from others. It is this focus on execution that should (and does) drive true distinction.

This very philosophy, learning from one another, especially in the experience arena, is the central ideology on which The Beryl Institute itself is built. That in creating a true community of practice, with individuals and organizations willing to share their successes and open up about their misses and needs, we have the potential for the greatest impact in healthcare today. It is about creating an organizational experience where individuals, organizations and resource providers can bring new ideas to bear as you determine the best path forward.

While this is built into everything we do throughout the year, it may be no better realized than in the few days we spend together at Patient Experience Conference or at our Regional Roundtables each year. In these few days together, hundreds of people representing hundreds of organizations around the world come together, not to declare "their” way is the right way, but rather to share their ideas as they might work for you. In bringing together the greatest number of voices, open to the broadest range of ideas, you position yourself well for success. In fact with Patient Experience Conference 2015 already on the books, I would be remiss if I didn't encourage you to share your ideas via a conference submission or ensure you have your attendance slotted for your 2015 budget. You also have two great opportunities to join us and our host organizations Virginia Mason Medical Center and Boston Children’s for two great roundtable experiences.

Again, I come back to my words I shared above - no one provider, no one vendor, no one organization holds the ultimate answer to the experience riddle. I would offer they each hold a little piece of the bigger puzzle. If we are willing to engage in the dialogue, ask for what we need and share what we know, we are all better for it. Then, it is each of our jobs to ensure it is done and done well.

Jason. A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  collaboration  culture  execution  expectations  healthcare  hospital impact  improving patient experience  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  Regional Roundtable 

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7 Steps to Accountability: A Key Ingredient in Improving Patient Experience

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, October 2, 2012
Updated: Monday, October 1, 2012

As I continue to visit healthcare organizations and engage with leaders globally there are clear emerging trends at the heart of effective efforts to address the patient and family experience. In my recent series of blogs I suggest we must recognize the implications of patient perceptions as a focus of our patient experience efforts. I support this by reinforcing that culture is a critical choice for organizations to consider in terms of how they look to shape those perceptions. In fact we cannot overlook the centrality of culture to the very definition of patient experience overall. I add that it is on a strong cultural foundation that we can then ensure a sense of engagement for our staff and patients.

The missing piece in this important dialogue is that of building a foundation of accountability in our healthcare organizations. It has been identified as a top issue for healthcare leaders during my On the Road visits and at our Regional Roundtable gatherings. In looking at all the suggested paths and plans to accountability some general themes emerge.

Building a basis for accountability in organizations requires a number of committed actions. Without these organizations run the risk of falling short on their defined patient experience objectives. They include:

1. Establish focused standards/expectations – Determine and clearly define what you expect in behaviors and actions as you create a culture of accountability.

2. Set clear consequences for inaction and rewards and recognition for action – Be willing to reinforce expectations consistently and use as opportunities for learning.

3. Provide learning opportunities to understand and see expectations in action – Ensure staff at all levels are clear on expected behaviors and consequences.

4. Communicate expectations, reinforcing what and why consistently and continuously– Keep expectations top of mind and be clear that these are part of who you are as an organization in every encounter.

5. Observe and evaluate staff at all levels providing feedback and/or coaching as needed – Turn actual encounters, good or bad, into learning moments and opportunities to ensure people are clear on expected behaviors and actions.

6. Execute on consequences immediately and thoughtfully – Respond rapidly when people miss the mark (or when people excel) to ensure people are aware of the importance of your expectations.

7. Revisit expectations often to ensure they meet the needs and objectives of the organization – Remember standard and expectations are dynamic and change with your organization’s needs. They must stay in tune with who you are as an organization (your values) and where you intend to go (your vision).

Accountability has been tossed around more and more in conversations today in healthcare organizations as something that leaders want to see more of. The reality is that accountability is not just something you simply expect and it just miraculously appears, it is something you must intentionally create expectations for and reinforce. As with patient experience itself, accountability needs a plan in order to ensure effective execution.

I often speak of patient experience efforts as a choice; one that requires rigorous work. This is overcoming something I call the performance paradox, which helps us recognize that many things we see as simple, clear and understandable are not always easy, trouble-free and painless to do. Yet I would suggest we have no other choice. As a positive patient experience is something we owe to our patients and their families in our healthcare settings, creating and sustaining a culture of accountability is something we actually owe to our staff in supporting their ability to create unparalleled experience.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
Executive Director
The Beryl Institute

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Coaching and Developing Others.

Tags:  accountability  choice  culture  defining patient experience  employee engagement  HCAHPS  improving patient experience  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  perception  Regional Roundtable  service excellence 

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7 Steps to Accountability: A Key Ingredient in Improving Patient Experience

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, October 2, 2012
Updated: Monday, October 1, 2012

As I continue to visit healthcare organizations and engage with leaders globally there are clear emerging trends at the heart of effective efforts to address the patient and family experience. In my recent series of blogs I suggest we must recognize the implications of patient perceptions as a focus of our patient experience efforts. I support this by reinforcing that culture is a critical choice for organizations to consider in terms of how they look to shape those perceptions. In fact we cannot overlook the centrality of culture to the very definition of patient experience overall. I add that it is on a strong cultural foundation that we can then ensure a sense of engagement for our staff and patients.

The missing piece in this important dialogue is that of building a foundation of accountability in our healthcare organizations. It has been identified as a top issue for healthcare leaders during my On the Road visits and at our Regional Roundtable gatherings. In looking at all the suggested paths and plans to accountability some general themes emerge.

Building a basis for accountability in organizations requires a number of committed actions. Without these organizations run the risk of falling short on their defined patient experience objectives. They include:

  1. Establish focused standards/expectations – Determine and clearly define what you expect in behaviors and actions as you create a culture of accountability.
  2. Set clear consequences for inaction and rewards and recognition for action – Be willing to reinforce expectations consistently and use as opportunities for learning.
  3. Provide learning opportunities to understand and see expectations in action – Ensure staff at all levels are clear on expected behaviors and consequences.
  4. Communicate expectations, reinforcing what and why consistently and continuously – Keep expectations top of mind and be clear that these are part of who you are as an organization in every encounter.
  5. Observe and evaluate staff at all levels providing feedback and/or coaching as needed – Turn actual encounters, good or bad, into learning moments and opportunities to ensure people are clear on expected behaviors and actions.
  6. Execute on consequences immediately and thoughtfully – Respond rapidly when people miss the mark (or when people excel) to ensure people are aware of the importance of your expectations.
  7. Revisit expectations often to ensure they meet the needs and objectives of the organization – Remember standard/expectations are dynamic and change with your organization’s needs. They must stay in tune with who you are as an organization (your values) and where you intend to go (your vision).

Accountability has been tossed around more and more in conversations today in healthcare organizations as something that leaders want to see more of. The reality is that accountability is not just something you simply expect and it just miraculously appears, it is something you must intentionally create expectations for and reinforce. As with patient experience itself, accountability needs a plan in order to ensure effective execution.

I often speak of patient experience efforts as a choice; one that requires rigorous work. This is overcoming something I call the performance paradox, which helps us recognize that many things we see as simple, clear and understandable are not always easy, trouble-free and painless to do. Yet I would suggest we have no other choice. As a positive patient experience is something we owe to our patients and their families in our healthcare settings, creating and sustaining a culture of accountability is something we actually owe to our staff in supporting their ability to create unparalleled experience.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.

Tags:  accountability  choice  culture  defining patient experience  employee engagement  HCAHPS  improving patient experience  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  perception  Regional Roundtable  service excellence 

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PermalinkComments (0)
 

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