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Patient Experience: A Global Opportunity and a Local Solution

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, December 4, 2012
Updated: Tuesday, December 4, 2012

Last week we held the second call of the new Global Patient Experience Network supported by The Beryl Institute. The call included Institute members from eight countries and spread across 18 time zones. Despite our differences in location, time of day, native language or accent, when the conversation started, we discovered that the concepts at the core of improving patient experience are fundamentally the same. Providing the best in experience for patients, families and the communities (and countries) we serve is an unwavering focus for people across healthcare systems and functions around the world.

As I listened to the conversation and we dug deeper in identifying what posed the greatest challenges and offered significant opportunities for improving patient experience, I was struck by the recognition (and even relief) that participants showed in how similar their issues were. One participant offered, "It’s comforting to know we are all contending with the same challenges and questions moving forward,” with a second individual noting, "It is amazing that at the end of the day we are all working towards the same end and facing the same issues.” This realization drew agreement and raised the excitement of the group in understanding that even with great distances between us, there are great similarities and therefore possibilities.

The group identified the same top issues central to patient experience efforts that I have seen in my travels. They included:
  • The importance of organization culture and our ability to manage change in today’s healthcare environment
  • The understanding and effective implementation of patient (and team) interaction processes from patient, physician and staff engagement and involvement to service recovery, post care follow-up and building consumer loyalty
  • The implications of measuring our patient experience efforts to gauge perception and understand the impact of each effort
  • The value of the structure of patient experience practice itself, ensuring a clear focus, supportive leadership, aligned roles and right structures to deliver on the best experience possible

While these are not the extent of the issues faced in addressing patient experience, it was evident that among peers separated by great distance, they still had closely knit similarities. This was especially significant for our team at the Institute as we have always approached our work from the belief that while systems may operate differently and policies might be distinct, the very fundamentals that drive a positive patient experience – the power of interactions, the importance of culture, the reality that perceptions matter and the realization that experience covers the continuum of care – as framed by the definition of patient experience, continues to hold true.

With this great commonality and the excitement generated in the discussion, it was also evident that our members recognized that patient experience is a local, dare I say personal effort. Each and every individual that plays a role along the care continuum has some level of responsibility. It is based on the sum of all interactions, as we suggest, that a patient and their family members gauge their own experience. Therefore in building a patient experience effort, it requires an understanding of your own organization, the people that comprise it, and the community (and demographics) that you serve. Patient experience success is not driven by a one model fits all solution, it is and forever should be something that meets the need of your organization and your patients whether in San Diego or Sydney, New York or New Delhi. Ultimately, patient experience is a global issue, but it is and will continue to be up to each of us locally to bring these grand ideas, the critical practices, and the day-to-day needs to life in every encounter. There is a great opportunity we have been given to move beyond policy to true cause, beyond process to effective practice and beyond "have tos” to "always dos”, that will impact the lives of patients and families globally. I have always suggested it is a choice…I maintain that and hope it is part of all our resolutions for positive and healthy New Year!

In reflecting on the launch of the Global Network and other Institute efforts in 2012, it is clear that this has been an amazing year for our growing global community, with now over 11,000 members and guests in 28 countries focused on improving the patient experience. We have all committed to something noble and important, the best possible experience and the health and well being for our fellow man. And we have been given a great opportunity, to turn a global need into something each and every one of us can impact directly. Happy Holidays to you all and I look forward to continuing to learn and grow together in the year ahead.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
Executive Director
The Beryl Institute

Related Body of Knowledge courses: History.

Tags:  choice  culture  employee engagement  global defining patient experience  global healthcare  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  patient engagement  Patient Experience  perception  service recovery 

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Creating a Field of Patient Experience – A Call to Action

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, May 8, 2012
Updated: Monday, May 7, 2012

Something powerful took place at this year’s Patient Experience Conference and it took some time in reflection for me to sort it out. We opened the conference with the powerful video "I am the Patient Experience” showing the faces of the many individuals key to the Patient Experience. We then reviewed the efforts underway to create a Body of Knowledge, shaping a model for ongoing development of patient experience leaders, and the potential for formal certification. The days together were filled with the connections and learning central to the vision of The Beryl Institute (see the pictures and review the lessons learned).

It culminated with our closing speaker, Tiffany Christensen who brought us the voice of the patient and suggested something profound. She noted that our work in patient experience is truly a movement. In fact, what we are doing together is shaping a field. As the faces of participants declaring "I am the Patient Experience” flashed on the screen to close the time together, it was evident something bigger was happening than a conference or even the growth of a global community of practice.

Captured in the energy and spirit that filled those three days in April, was the same commitment and possibility that was shared by the over 300 individuals from 8 countries that have contributed to framing the 15 domains in the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge or even the over 8,000 members and guests that engage with the Institute community every month. The Body of Knowledge now stands for something bigger than just things we "need to know” to be effective practitioners in patient experience. It represents the foundation of a field grounded in knowledge and experience that can have lasting and profound impact on how those in healthcare work and how patients and families are ultimately cared for.

Creating a field is no small task and will not emerge from any one individual or organization. It must result from the voices of many, which is why I encourage your continued involvement in the Body of Knowledge effort. At The Beryl Institute, we look to be the catalyst, convener and coordinator of this important work. The next steps in the process will be the creation of work teams that will outline the key content for each of the domains of knowledge. Together with respected subject matter experts these outlines will help shape the learning needed to sharpen the skills of current practitioners and create a path to develop future leaders for the field. I invite you to learn more about the process and consider contributing to the work of these teams

I mentioned in a recent Hospital Impact blog that patient experience is not a fad, but is now a critical component of healthcare overall. We must work together to solidify the knowledge needed to lead, continue to support the research that will stretch our ideas and practice and come together as a global community that will take a stand for what we know is right in ensuring the best of experiences for our patients and their families. If we do this with the passion that I saw during our three days together at Patient Experience Conference 2012, there is no doubt that what we are doing is truly creating a field of patient experience.

Jason A. Wolf
Executive Director
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  body of knowledge  culture  Field of Patient Experience  improving patient experience  Interaction  open comment period  patient  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  thought leadership  Tiffany Christensen 

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Your Patient Experience Priority for 2012 May Be as Simple as Taking the First Step

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Wednesday, January 4, 2012
Updated: Wednesday, January 4, 2012

With all the predictions of new healthcare trends and the expanding requirements being placed on healthcare providers, one thing holds true – at the center of all these efforts and initiatives lies the patient. This is not patient-centeredness in the traditional sense of simply the care setting, but it is now clear that whether you are ready or not, the patient has taken center stage in our healthcare system.

For some, the patient experience was the fundamental driver of their efforts well before any requirements were raised; providing the greatest service and highest quality outcomes for the patients and families served at every touch point. Others have found new initiative in addressing patient experience with expanding financial implications. Yet many still struggle with where to focus, what to do or even if to act.

The harsh reality is that as of today over two-thirds of the initial performance period for Value-Based Purchasing is now in the books. With a closing date of March 31, 2012 and then the reality that reimbursements will be impacted just six months later, this is not the time to get stuck in a state of confusion. If you are not already moving, you still have time to act.

I have been asked by many healthcare leaders for the secret to the "best” patient experience. And while I will be the first to say I do not believe there is one specific formula that leads to patient experience success, I have offered a few considerations. In my recent blog with Hospital Impact, I reiterated the importance of four central strategies:

1. A clear organizational definition for patient experience.

2. A focused role to support patient experience efforts.

3. A recognition that patient experience is more than just a survey.

4. A commitment at the highest levels of leadership.

These suggestions are not complicated initiatives, but rather they should be a simple choice.

In every instance of high performance in patient experience what I observed above all else is that willingness to make a choice. For some it was a broad strategic effort where patient satisfaction was a key measure in performance compensation. For others it was finding that one area where they could begin to move the needle – creating a more quiet and relaxing environment, rounding with intention and empathy to ensure a patient and their family felt attended to, or simply communicating consistently that they were taking every action possible to ensure their patient’s pain was managed. I have suggested and will reassert here that excellence in patient experience emerges in the ability to balance its need to be a strategic imperative with clear measurable, tangible, and yes tactical action.

Most importantly, as my grandfather so wisely shared with me years ago, the more complicated we choose to make things, the more difficult they seem to accomplish. Patient experience is a critical issue, with increasing demands and pressures intertwined with a passion for care and an understanding that it is the right thing to do. This does not mean we need to make it bigger than we can handle. Or even that we need be discouraged if we have finally been able to make it a priority after others may seem "so far ahead”. The reality is that whenever and wherever you start is the right time and place if the intention is right and true. Now you have the choice, one as simple as committing to take that first step. My hope is that each of us, in every healthcare setting, has resolved to do something to improve the patient experience in 2012.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
Executive Director
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  bottom line  culture  defining patient experience  improving patient experience  Interaction  Patient Experience  service excellence  value-based purchasing 

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The Power of Interaction: You are the Patient Experience

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, December 6, 2011
Updated: Tuesday, December 6, 2011

In looking back at 2011, I have touched on a cross-section of topics on the patient experience – from service excellence andanticipation to value-based purchasing and bottom line impact. This year has led us to heightened awareness of the impact performance scores will have on dollars realized and increasing recognition that the patient experience is a priority with staying power. The Beryl Institute’s benchmarking study, The State of Patient Experience in American Hospitals, revealed both the great intentions and significant challenges that are at hand in addressing the critical issue of patient experience.

Our research supports, and I fundamentally believe, that there is a need for a dedicated and focused patient experience leader in every healthcare organization. Yet in the midst of all this attention, we may have overlooked the most important component – the immense power, significant impact and immeasurable value of a single interaction.

What does this mean? Interaction is simply defined as a mutual or reciprocal action or influence. The key is mutual action; something that occurs directly between two individuals. No interaction is the same, but it requires a choice by both parties to engage and respond as they best see fit. In healthcare settings, be it hospitals, medical offices, surgery centers or outpatient clinics, there are countless interactions every day. The question is: are they taken for granted as situations that just occur or are they seen as significant opportunities to impact experience? Perhaps in thinking about experience as a bigger issue, the importance of these moments of personal relationship has been missed.

What this means for improving the patient experience may be simple. Rather than waiting for that one leader to build the right plan or for your culture to develop in just the right way, you each instead recognize one key fact – you are the patient experience. I acknowledge there is a need for a strong leader and a solid cultural foundation on which to build, but at its core patient experience is about what each and every individual chooses to do at the most intimate moment of interaction. If these moments are used as the building blocks to achieve our greatest of intentions, patient experience will be the better for it. As you look to next year, whether you sweep the floors or sit in the c-suite, the choice should be clear. In today’s chaotic world of healthcare, the greatest moment of impact may be in the smallest of encounters. It is here that the most significant successes be they for scores, dollars or care will be realized. Happy holidays to you all!

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
Executive Director
The Beryl Institute
 

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Organizational Effectiveness.

Tags:  bottom line  Continuum of Care  culture  defining patient experience  HCAHPS  improving patient experience  Interaction  Patient Experience  return on service  service anticipation  service excellence  service recovery  value-based purchasing 

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