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It is Time for the Experience Era

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Thursday, May 5, 2016
Updated: Thursday, May 5, 2016

Just three weeks ago as we gathered at Patient Experience Conference 2016 I challenged our participants and the public watching us live that this is our moment in patient experience. If we look to make the kind of change we believe is needed in our new healthcare world, we must work to ensure the conversation on patient experience now rests at the heart of healthcare itself.

This commitment to experience requires a macro-perspective and one I continue to reinforce every chance I can. Patient (and family, resident, elder, etc.) experience is not just about satisfaction or even essential efforts such as patient engagement or approaches such as patient- and family-centeredness. Rather experience is ALL someone has in their encounter with a healthcare organization, be it in a clinical setting at the bedside or exam room, scheduling an appointment, engaging with a bill, and even communicating with a friend at a community event or while at the local market. Every one of these interactions shape the experience someone has, they shape the story someone carries with them about it and influences their perceptions and ultimately their actions.

The bottom line is that in your healthcare organization and the thousands around the world that are engaging with or attending to the needs of their customers right now, you are providing an experience. The question is, are you strategically planning for and addressing it? In a consumer driven healthcare world, regardless of national system, policy incentives or other supports or constraints, the ultimate opportunity is to ensure experience is not simply left to chance. Rather it should be part of the very fiber of your organization, representing the kind of encounters you hope to provide and the outcomes you look to achieve. Yes, at its core, experience encompasses all we tackle in healthcare from quality, safety and service interactions to the implications of cost and the influence that outcomes have on public, systemic and personal health decisions.

I also believe as the experience movement coalesces around these core ideas it has the opportunity to stand with conviction, grounded in evidence, to declare that experience drives the very outcomes we look to achieve in healthcare: clinical outcomes, financial results, consumer loyalty and community reputation. In the latest issue of Patient Experience Journal, I offer, "An investment in a strong and positive patient experience is the leading choice you can and should be making in healthcare today. The results of this decision will only lead to even greater and lasting results.”

This then may be our simple, yet significant call to action. That we recognize and act on the reality that experience encompasses all we do in healthcare and drives the outcomes we aspire to. In that light it brings us to reflect on a new era in healthcare. Thanks to insights from Don Berwick in challenging us to consider a third (what he calls the moral) era, I hope to push us further. Beyond just acknowledging the operational considerations he suggests as we look at how healthcare as a system progresses, we too must look at healthcare for all it was intended to and still must strive to accomplish. It is time to place the human experience back at the heart of healthcare. It is time for the experience era.

The experience era calls us to consider 8 fundamental actions:

  • Acknowledge experience is a global movement
  • Recognize experience encompasses all we do
  • Remember in experience all voices matter
  • Focus on value from the perspective of the consumer
  • Ensure transparency for accessibility & understanding
  • Measure & incent what matters
  • Share wildly and steal willingly
  • Reignite our commitment to purpose

If we move forward with purpose and choose to align our efforts with an experience mindset, we not only welcome the experience era; we reignite the heart of healthcare itself. With a focus on those we care for and serve and a commitment to those who provide care and support those efforts every day, we can build the most healthy and vibrant system of care the world has ever seen. It will take all voices to do this, all nations to commit, all systems to realign themselves and all organizations to focus their intention. It will take all of us to make the choice that experience matters and then act. That is the opportunity we now have in front of us…I am ready for our first steps forward together.

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  aligning efforts  commitment  encounters  experience era  interaction  movement  Patient Experience Conference  purpose  value 

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Considerations for Patient Experience Excellence: 2016

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Thursday, January 7, 2016

As we have watched the patient experience movement grow in the last five years of our journey at The Beryl Institute, we have seen increasing levels of commitment to this effort and a refocusing on what matters versus simply what is measured. Many began their involvement in patient experience efforts purely due to motivation by policy, measurement and then eventually financial implications for outcomes. These dynamic shifts driven by policy in the United States were not unique to the country, but rather we have experienced a global wave of acknowledgement of and commitment to action around addressing the experience in healthcare.

What has stirred this broader global movement and created a dynamic shift in how healthcare operates regardless of system or policy? I offer it is connectivity and proximity – not necessarily physical proximity, but what I would call "social proximity”. Social proximity, driven by connectivity, access to information, an open willingness to share ideas, constant access to research, news and even rumors all contribute to an environment for humankind that has dramatically shifted in the last decade and with increasing speed in the last few years.

So what are the implications for this on patient experience? We are now at a critical turning point where one can no longer diminish or downplay that experience matters. In fact, I would warn those that do or more so resist or fight this shift, that you will soon be swallowed up by the tides if you choose not to climb aboard. We are at a pivotal time in the journey due to these and many other dynamics changing how we deliver care and how consumers of care perceive and expect it.

2016 provides an interesting transition point now 15 years into this rapidly flowing century. In thinking about the year ahead, I offer some considerations whether patient and family member, healthcare provider or a company providing services and resources to healthcare – we are now all in this together.

  • Experience is a MACRO issue. We are no longer talking about "experience of care” as first portrayed in the Triple Aim. Rather we are now readily acknowledging and acting to encompass quality, safety, service, cost, environment, transitions and all the spaces in between in the experience equation
  • Patient and family (consumer) voice is stronger than it has ever been (and won’t be quieting down any time soon). Patients have found their voices in new ways and are showing a fearless willingness to challenge what was once a paternalistic model to raise their own wants and needs.
  • Technology is no longer a differentiator, i.e., specifically saying you are engaging in technology solutions. It will be how you use technology, the information it can provide and the way it impacts your ability to provide care and more positive experiences that will matter most.
  • Tactics, even strong ones may move you forward, but will not support you in achieving ultimate success. There is now a clear recognition that experience efforts are no longer driven simply by a list of tactics, but rather by comprehensive strategies with unwavering focus and committed investment.
  • The "soft stuff” matters and all engaged in healthcare are expressing this in their own ways. Our latest State of Patient Experience study reinforced this very point; that culture, leadership and the people in your organization are the primary keys to driving strong outcomes and overall success.
  • We need to stop calling the "soft stuff” soft. It is perhaps the most challenging and intense area of focus we can and should have in organizational life. Culture change, aligning leadership, ensuring actively engaged people is perhaps the hardest work we can take on. So while deemed soft (perhaps even as an excuse for an inability to affect them), we cannot relent in a commitment to make these efforts central to any plan.
  • "Sharing is cool” – yes for you parents out there I just quoted Pete the Cat (Pete’s Big Lunch to be exact). It remains astonishing to me how so much of what we espouse to our children as critical skills, we lose as we move forward in our careers. Experience excellence is driven not by how much you know as an organization, but rather how much you are willing to share. A value-based world competes on the execution to excellence not simply volume and we should not be hypnotized by one "way” as sacred. It is in our willingness so share broadly and openly that we collectively win. The new healthcare environment calls on us to do this.
  • The global dialogue on experience excellence is emerging as boundary-less and systems will look beyond organizational constraints to the commonalities they can find in driving the best in outcomes for all being cared for or caring for others.

I conclude with one more consideration:

  • Aim high, but start where you have solid ground. I remain resolute that we all have a commitment, whether we have yet acknowledged it or not, to provide the best in experience in healthcare (and must be willing to fully engage in what experience encompasses). Change will increasingly be transformational in healthcare and in simple choices great shifts can occur, but it will take the building blocks of success on which to reach the greatest heights.

Icarus, who in an act of great hubris and in an attempt to achieve it all, flew too close to the sun with his wax wings and fell to the sea. As we look to 2016, we must never let the big ideas fade from view or the small ideas impede our progress. It will be finding a way in which to move each of our organizations forward from where they are, with an understanding that the world is dramatically shifting all around us with increasing speed, where success can be achieved. This is our new world in healthcare and in the patient experience movement that now churns at its core. I believe if we are clear in our efforts and intent, we can and will achieve the best in outcomes for all. Here is to a great year ahead.

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  consumer  culture  global healthcare  Interaction  patient and family  tactics  technology 

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How Will You Invest in Patient Experience in 2016?

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Tuesday, December 1, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, December 1, 2015

We recently celebrated our first five years as a community of practice and looked back, somewhat in awe, at the incredible growth of this organization over such a short time. The Beryl Institute is now a global community of almost 40,000 individuals passionate about improving the healthcare experience for patients, families and caregivers.

The momentum continues, as does the realization that organizations are making significant investments in time, energy and dollars to ensure they are prepared to deliver the best possible patient experience. We see these investments in many forms from hiring teams to training leaders and staff to building and supporting cultures of excellence.

As we shared in the 2015 State of Patient Experience Benchmarking study, senior patient experience leadership and staff investment is growing with 42% of respondents having a Chief Experience Officer (or comparable position) compared to only 22% two years ago.  Along with that, the size of patient experience teams is growing; 33% of organizations reported having five or more staff members supporting patient experience efforts. 

The Beryl Institute community reflects this trend as well. This year over 200 organizations will invest in institutional membership – meaning they provide unlimited access to the Institute’s white papers, webinars, topic calls, learning bites, etc. to everyone within their facility. They are making a statement that people in ALL roles impact the patient experience and should have access to research and collaboration that will assist their efforts.

We have also seen tremendous interest in learning and professional development programs intended to train patient experience leaders and other staff. We recently increased our virtual classroom offerings in the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge courses to support growing participation in the community-developed program that provides Certificates in Patient Experience Leadership and Patient Advocacy.

Patient Experience Conference had its largest attendance to date this year and we were honored to partner with member organizations to host sold out Regional Roundtable events in San Francisco, Charlotte and Minneapolis. Our community is eager to gain (and share) knowledge and to invest in their personal career growth. In fact, today our sister organization, Patient Experience Institute, will offer the first testing opportunity for those hoping to earn their CPXP, the professional certification for Patient Experience Leaders.

While we’re excited to celebrate the five-year milestone, we acknowledge how much work is still to be done. We imagine (and hope to help inspire) a world where all healthcare organizations appreciate the power and impact of patient experience efforts and make without hesitation the investments necessary to be the best they can be for patients and families.

Earlier this year we released Our Stand, a list of guiding principles we’ve identified in our five years of leading this work that can have significant impact on patient experience success. I share them again as a reminder as you evaluate your own efforts and consider what investment opportunities make sense to support your specific needs.

We believe organizations and systems committed to providing the best in experience WILL:

  • Identify and support accountable leadership with committed time and focused intent to shape and guide experience strategy
  • Establish and reinforce a strong, vibrant and positive organizational culture and all it comprises
  • Develop a formal definition for what experience is to their organization
  • Implement a defined process for continuous patient and family input and engagement
  • Engage all voices in driving comprehensive, systemic and lasting solutions
  • Look beyond clinical experience of care to all interactions and touch points
  • Focus on alignment across all segments of the continuum and the spaces in between
  • Encompass both a focus on healing and a commitment to well-being

As you prepare for the coming year I challenge you to reflect on your organization’s commitment to experience improvement. Where are you exceling and where are your opportunities to do even more for your patients, families, caregivers and staff? Our patient experience community is here to support your journey and I encourage you to take full advantage of the incredible resources and knowledge available. 

Wishing you a wonderful holiday season and a successful New Year!

 

Stacy Palmer
Vice President, Strategy and Member Experience
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  body of knowledge  certification  collaboration  community of practice  Continuum of Care  culture  employee engagement  Field of Patient Experience  global healthcare  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  Interactions  Leadership  Nurse Leadership  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  Regional Roundtable  service excellence 

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Expanding the dialogue on experience excellence to long term care

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, September 2, 2014
Updated: Monday, September 1, 2014

When we first developed the definition for patient experience with a group of contributing healthcare leaders, four themes emerged as central to our discussion and ultimately to the definition itself – the sum of all interactions, shaped by an organization’s culture, that influence patient perceptions across the continuum of care. These themes shaped the fundamentals for action in providing the best in experience and I still see them as central and imperative across healthcare settings today.

Experience efforts are shaped through the interactions of all individuals involved and grounded in the organization’s culture through which they are delivered. It is the actions of all participants in the care experience – caregivers, support teams, patients and family members alike – that ultimately influence the perceptions of experience and create the lasting impact (and I suggest ripple effect) that each experience has. Experience is a partnership with patients, residents and families, not a doing to, and these words reinforce this critical point.

It is the last element of the definition that is also perhaps the most easily accepted: across the continuum of care. As the patient experience movement has flourished, there has been growing recognition that experience stretches well beyond the four walls of any clinical encounter or the physical structures of the acute care setting. In fact, the ideas of experience, in variations of language including patient, resident or person-centeredness, have permeated the wide array of care experiences one can have in healthcare today. This idea may be no better reinforced than the focus on the experience of individuals in long-term care.

The effort to provide a strong and positive experience for individuals in long-term care is not a new concept. This idea has been addressed in the dialogues of great institutions such as the former Picker Institute and now via Planetree and through organizations such as the Pioneer Network, Leading Age and the American Health Care Association (AHCA). Partly driven by policy, such as we have seen sweep the US healthcare system in other segments of the continuum with the CAHPS efforts, and framed by what we know to be the right thing to do, long-term care has long been focused on the elements of resident quality, safety and service and the built environment to ensure the best for those in their care.

There is a growing understanding in all environments, that aside from the right thing to do for those in our care, or even a must do, there is also increasing policy focus and requirements that not only measure action, but also tie financial implications to them. Yes, we must acknowledge the financial implications of this effort as well, including the reality that individuals in the healthcare system at all points on the continuum are now consumers – people carefully select doctors, they make decisions on which hospitals to seek care and they look long and hard at the options in selecting a location for a parent or loved one to reside for long-term care needs.

If we accept choice is a factor now in healthcare, then experience matters. In focusing on the continuum of care, it matters to the patients, residents, people in our care, it matters to their families and it matters to all who deliver care as well. It is for this reason we continue to evolve our work at The Beryl institute to expand the experience conversation to all points on the continuum of care and to acknowledge the opportunities at the moments of care transition as well.

We have worked to engage broader voices in the physician practice setting by exploring how experience is being addressed by physician clinics and groups and our events are expanding to include greater dialogue and content on the important practices taking place in the ambulatory and outpatient settings. With equal focus (and the support of energized and committed members of our community), we are embarking in expanding our efforts to address experience in the long-term care setting as well. In the coming months, through Patient Experience Conference 2015 and beyond, we will work to collaborate with leading thinkers and organizations to reinforce and expand the critical conversation of experience in the long-term care environment. This will include papers, webinars, conference sessions and expanding research into this area of the continuum.

We hope through these efforts and partnerships we can support the critical dialogue of experience at all points on the care continuum. We will strive to continue our growth as a community encouraging and supporting the dialogue among individuals impacting each touch point in the care experience. If we maintain that experience as defined truly crosses the continuum of care, not only is this a critical effort to take on, it is a must do in ensuring that the experience conversation – the critical confluence of quality, safety and service and the fundamental considerations of people, process and place – engages all and includes all voices. We are excited by this next stage of the experience movement and invite and encourage your thoughts, ideas and participation.

Jason. A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute 

Tags:  choice  community of practice  Continuum of Care  culture  defining patient experience  Field of Patient Experience  HCAHPS  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  Interactions  long term care  patient  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  service excellence  voice 

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Become a Leader in the Patient Experience Movement

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Tuesday, August 5, 2014
Updated: Tuesday, August 5, 2014

I recently received a note from a new member who is early in her career and looking for ways to maximize her membership to get "plugged in” to the Institute and gain credibility within the patient experience community. We get questions like this often. While passionate about getting involved in the patient experience movement, many of our members aren’t quite sure how to get started.

To help, I want to share the suggestions I gave her. I believe they are applicable for patient experience leaders at any stage. First, leadership is not about years of experience. It’s about influence (and willingness to contribute). While healthcare has been around for centuries, a focused patient experience movement is still taking shape at all levels of healthcare organizations. To "plug in” and be a leader, you need to do one thing – share.

The power of sharing is what The Beryl Institute community is built upon and in doing so people reap even greater benefits themselves. Leadership in our movement is grounded in a generosity of spirit and contribution, collaboration and openness.

 The Beryl Institute offers many ways for you to share and be active participants in the patient experience movement.

  • Get engaged in the conversation. That's the best way to share what you're doing and learn from others. We have Patient Experience Leaders and Patient Advocacy listservs that are very active. Be sure to sign up for those and respond to questions and/or pose your own. And when you find something that’s successful in your organization – share it through a case study.

  • Attend a live event. We have a very engaged, energetic community and they love meeting and brainstorming with new people. It's also a great chance to find a mentor. We have two Regional Roundtables coming up in October - one in Boston and one in Seattle. And Patient Experience Conference 2015 will be April 8-10, 2015 in Dallas. If travel is a concern, you can talk to other members via phone on our monthly topic calls.

  • Immerse yourself in the PX Body of Knowledge (BOK). It's a community-driven framework highlighting the 15 domains critical for an effective PX leader. We currently have courses available for 8 of the 15 domains with the other 7 coming soon. You can gain lots of information from other resources available through your membership, but I always recommend the BOK courses to people looking to establish a solid foundation.

One of our members recently commented that he views his involvement with The Beryl Institute as much more than a membership. He believes his engagement is a bigger statement supporting the patient experience movement. His outlook exemplifies the passion we see everyday from the community.

In fact, I am constantly amazed by the eagerness of our members to contribute, get involved and truly become leaders in the movement. With over 60 members on our boards and councils, subgroups like the Patient Advocacy and Physician communities, and regular contributors to our guest blog, case studies and On the Road program, those desiring to be thought leaders in this critical movement have a place. You just need to choose to engage.

And for the many of you already involved in The Beryl Institute who want to do even more to support the movement, my advice to you is the same: share. One of the greatest ways to be a leader in the patient experience movement is to pass along a story, case study, research report or other resource that might inspire those around you to look at their roles differently, to see the impact they can have on creating the best possible experience for patients, families and caregivers. Simply, share. 

"Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap but by the seeds that you plant.”  - Robert Louis Stevenson


Stacy Palmer

Vice President, Strategy and Member Experience
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  community of practice  Field of Patient Experience  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  Leadership  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  service excellence  thought leadership 

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How Will You Inspire the Patient Experience Movement? Four Considerations for 2014

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Tuesday, January 14, 2014

I am inspired. The New Year has arrived with great energy at The Beryl Institute. We start 2014 as a global community of practice of over 20,000 professionals, focused without hesitation on ensuring the best in experience for patients, families and one another in healthcare.

I am inspired by the continued commitments expressed for this work: by The Beryl Institute’s Patient Experience Scholars who met recently to share their research and reinforce their willingness to encourage and support others; by the members of the Global Patient & Family Advisory Council who want to influence how patients and family members are heard and engaged in making a profound difference in healthcare; by the many contributing to the development of the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge courses soon to be available to the community; and by many more.

I am inspired by how in the first two weeks of a new year, such commitment and intent can emerge, built on all that has come before and focused with purpose on the great opportunities ahead. As I reflect on this idea, a question emerged and perhaps a challenge for each of us to consider:

How will you inspire the patient experience movement in the year ahead?

I pose this question with the hope that actions and considerations from the smallest moments of unparalleled kindness to the largest strategic triumphs all find room to take root and grow. Inspiration comes in all shapes and sizes, but in this diversity it has strong commonalities – it causes us to feel a sense of something special and powerful. It provides a boundless energy to influence, lead, change and make a difference. This is an exciting prospect in seeing that each of us can choose to have an impact. And while no two actions will be exactly alike, I do want to offer a few thoughts on how you can continue to frame your patient experience efforts to inspire yourself and others.

As we return to the definition of patient experience, I continue to experience its relevance time-and-time again in the application of these words to central actions associated with excellence. In reviewing its words – the sum of all interactions, shaped by an organization’s culture, that influence patient perceptions, across the continuum of care – I again see clear directions on moving your own experience efforts forward. They include:

1. Reinforce strategic focus. Patient experience has proven itself to be a relevant part of the healthcare conversation. It has surpassed the challenges of being dubbed a fad; it too has shown it has stronger legs than just serving as a policy framework. Experience is a central strategic pillar to organizational performance and success. Patient Experience in its broadest sense should be a clear and transparent component of every healthcare organization’s strategy.

2. Clarify and map your critical interactions. Experience doesn’t happen on billboards or in espoused actions, it happens at the most personal moments, at those points of engagement between one individual and another. The ultimate tool in patient experience improvement is your self, your heart, your hands and arms, your minds, your compassion and your common sense. We have a huge opportunity to map the interactions that occur on the patient path to ensure we consider the most effective way to respond at every touch point.

3. Model desired behaviors. Simply put, if interactions drive experience, then the behaviors that comprise them are the conduits that direct these interactions in one way or another. Organizational culture is shaped by behaviors, they represent the people, presence and purpose of an organization overall and no slogan, policy or program will trump the power of individual behavior. We must model, observe, coach and improve constantly to impact experience outcomes.

4. Expand your listening. As we ended 2013 exploring the Voices of Measurement, we learned that the power of data is only as valid as what we choose to do with it. Collection or reporting data for the sake of data misses the opportunity for learning and relevant action. To capitalize on the value of the voices that surround us in healthcare we must expand our listening. Experience is measured first in the direct voices of healthcare consumers, who remain our most significant mirror into our own efforts, but it is also found in the voices of our peers and colleagues. We are only capable of achieving our strategy through our people. They are much more than pawns to direct, but rather living resources accountable for ensuring excellence.

Perhaps these ideas will help spark your own thoughts on how you will choose to inspire the patient experience movement. Regardless of which direction you go, I hope you recognize the power that exists in your own personal choice and the ability to impact the experience of the person that is coming next. The year ahead can and should be about a great many things both personally and professionally. My hope is that you find you can and will be an inspiration in your efforts. This cause is too great for your efforts to be anything less. Now the question remains, what will you do? I look forward to your updates with great anticipation.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  accountability  Advocacy  body of knowledge  choice  community of practice  consumer advocacy  Continuum of Care  culture  defining patient experience  employee engagement  Field of Patient Experience  global defining patient experience  global healthcare  HCAHPS  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  Interactions  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  service excellence  thought leadership  voice 

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Patient Experience and the Freedom of Choice

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, July 2, 2013
Updated: Tuesday, July 2, 2013

In writing a blog for a US-based, global organization on the week of July 4th, I am hard pressed not to think about the concepts of independence, of freedom and of what those concepts provide for. To be independent, to be of free will, is something most, if not all, aspire to. It is ingrained in our human nature, for at its base is an idea so simple, yet at times so complex – the power of choice. For me this concept of choice is the essence of patient experience itself.

When I talk to people about the strategies and tactics of patient expedience improvement, I start with the simple recognition that what we do in healthcare - as human beings caring for human beings– is about the choices we make. From leaders guiding organizations on what priorities are set each day, to frontline caregivers across healthcare settings we are making choices in every moment, not just on what care to deliver, but how to deliver it as well.

This power of choice is profoundly important, and of increasing influence in our healthcare systems today. While we once may have gone directly to our local physician or hospital and listened intently with respect, following every word and instruction, the nature of healthcare itself has changed. I know to some this poses a great concern and others even disdain. For me, it reveals the true potential for excellence we have in healthcare systems around the world.

The debate has long simmered on if patients are customers of care. Using this term allows supporters of the historic healthcare hierarchy to diminish the very voice of patients, most often unintentionally. And you may be surprised to hear that I agree. Patients for the most part in healthcare today are not the customers of care. Customers are those individuals or organizations that choose to pay for a product of service. In fact following this logic, most often, insurance companies and/or government entities are the true customers of healthcare as they are the one’s directly funding services or paying the bill.

What does this mean then for our choice as patients? While many rightly make the argument, that as patients we do not choose to fall ill, have an accident, etc., that is we do not most often choose to be customers of healthcare, we overlook what I suggest above – that as human beings we still have choice. This distinguishes to me where patient experience plays it most significant role, especially economically. Patients are without question consumers of healthcare, regardless of systems, locality or structures. From an economic perspective it is the consumer who drives markets and influences business viability. Consumerism is the consideration that the free choice of individuals strongly influences what is offered to a market, what grows and what is overlooked. Therefore consumers and the choice they bring have strong economic impact.

The bottom line is that as patients have independence, even with some constraints based on insurance or in governmental healthcare systems, and therefore they have choice. Patients will note where the experience – the culmination of quality, safety and service – is best. And they wont keep it secret. Outside of the increasing use of government surveys globally to measure and publicly report performance, other consumer outlets are quickly booming – have you yelped your physician’s office lately, or seen the dialogue on Facebook about the care in your local hospital? This is consumerism at its finest and it is having great impact.

Patients have discovered they too have choice in the system, to not just expect, but to directly ask for and seek the best care they can find. Yes, patients do not choose a healthcare encounter like they would a hotel or an entertainment experience, they actually do so MORE significantly because this choice is about their own or a family member or friend’s well-being. A dear colleague, an inspiration for patients as true consumers of care, and a contributor to our Voices of Patients and Family paper – "e-Patient Dave” deBronkart clearly expresses the need for us as patients and family to choose to engage in our care, in ensuring we are fully informed and in doing so make the right choices.

I too am reminded about a story a gentlemen shared once with me about his 80-year old mother who when finding she needed hip replacement, scoured the internet for information on the procedure, recovery times, outcomes, etc. She discovered, that while scheduled for surgery at her local hospital (where she had gone for years), there was a better place for her to have her surgery in another state a plane ride away. She booked the ticket, made the trip and had her surgery. Now while all patients choices may not be that extreme, we must acknowledge that we all have choice – in some ways it is all we have – in how we decide to deliver care or on where we decide to receive it.

On a week where independence is held high, it is important that we remember it is not just a holiday in the United States, but a statement about the very freedom we have as individuals, as consumers: the freedom to choose. The Declaration of Independence declared that individuals "are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” There may be no stronger place for us to remember these choices than in the decisions affecting our health. As healthcare leaders we must remember this, as caregivers honor it, and as patients and families never forget – the choice is truly ours.

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Metrics and Measurement.

Tags:  Choice  Consumerism  culture  Customer  Customer Service  Freedom  Hospitality  improving patient experience  Interaction  Patient Experience  service excellence  voice 

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Patients are Partners in Experience, Not Just Recipients of One

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Thursday, June 6, 2013
Updated: Thursday, June 6, 2013

In my most recent Hospital Impact blog I noted that "how” we choose to do things in healthcare will and should trump the "what”. This is supported by my travels through numerous healthcare organizations where it is becoming evident that the core practices organizations are using to drive patient experience success are more and more consistent. While some might see this as limiting, I see it as encouraging.

Why is that? It means we are listening to one another, learning from each other and showing an incredible willingness to "steal ideas shamelessly” as a well respected CEO once shared with me in describing a component of their organizational success. That means the ‘what’ we do is not very different location to location. The distinguishing characteristic in experience is not the things you do, but the way in which your deliver. This is at the core of the very definition of patient experience as "the sum of all interactions, shaped by an organization’s culture”.

This ability to listen and learn from one another is a central value of all we do at The Beryl Institute. As a global community of practice we can (and must) learn from all edges of the community – those Institutions rated the "best” or seen as the "biggest” do not represent the only expertise. Rather it is in trying and executing of ideas in organizations of all shapes, sizes and focus through which excellence is supported and shared. It is based on this premise that the idea of a broad and inclusive range of voices has been so central to our work.

In returning to the conversation of "how”, I reflect on the recent conversations I had with 18 incredible patient and family advocates committed to the work of improving quality, safety and service for patients and families around the world in preparing the most recent paper from The Beryl Institute – Voices of Patients and Families: Partners in the Patient Experience. The stories these individual’s shared of compassion personified and at times the uglier side of care help us realize that there is power in how we choose to manage the interactions we have in healthcare every day. That it is truly more than the tactics, and rather the execution that matters.

The point I make here is all the tactics in the world amount to very little if all they are is something we do TO people in our care. The old language of provider and recipient may well still be used in healthcare, but its use is outdated and indicative of a system in need of change. Patients – yes, you and I, our children and parents, family and friends – are active parts of the healthcare equation, not passive recipients of it. We need to ensure we start acting this way. This perspective is exemplified through the work of such great organizations as the Society for Participatory Medicine.

While there are countless lessons shared by the individuals interviewed in the Voices paper, we inherently know many of them ourselves. Our contributors helped frame three central ideas in ensuring partnership in the care environment:

1. Acknowledge patients are not subjects in the healthcare process or "something” you should talk about or plan for in third person.

2. Recognize patients are not necessarily wired to actively engage in the healthcare process, due both to the complexity of healthcare and the nature of the system itself (that potentially diminishes the role of the patient in an unspoken hierarchy of expertise). You must ask, encourage, and act on the patient’s voice.

3. Consider coordinating efforts to identify and incorporate patient perceptions into the overall planning of care.

Personally, as I continue the journey of new fatherhood, I saw this play out in the very interactions we have had with our pediatrician. At our stage as new parents, we could be scolded, challenged or even talked down to about how we handle situations. Instead our doc engages us based on our questions, our hopes and fears. I know she is getting all the needed clinical work done, but she is including us as patients and family, as partners in the process. This is an active decision on her part, it is one that engages us in the care of our son and ensures a positive experience with every visit. "How” is a choice we can all make in healthcare and is one I believe will make all the difference.

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Patient & Family Centeredness.

Tags:  bottom line  choice  culture  defining patient experience  employee engagement  expectations  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  Interactions  partnership  patient engagement  Patient Experience  patient stories  service excellence 

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Why Community Matters in Improving Patient Experience

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Wednesday, March 6, 2013

They say when someone mentions a Red Beetle – the automobile version from Volkswagen or "bug” – you go from not seeing them at all to seeing them everywhere you look. In a similar fashion my recent conversations on the patient experience have raised this sense of "everywhere” awareness to the idea of community. From as recently as our March 5 webinar on patient engagement to the final interviews I just conducted for our pending paper on the Voices of Patients & Families on Patient Experience, there is a recognition that while patient experience is built on the foundation of countless personal interactions, when pulled together it is a true community issue and, I would suggest, opportunity.

The idea of community aligns strongly with the definition of patient experience that asserts patient experience crosses the entire continuum of care. I need to reinforce from the perspective we hold at the Institute this is not just the continuum within the four walls of the clinical experience, but from the very first encounters someone has with your organization to the stories they share well after their departure or discharge. Where are these stories told and where do they live beyond the boundaries of what you can control? In your communities, in the voices of people that have either had encounters with your organization or who have heard the stories, true or embellished, about what happened within your walls.

This means to provide a true experience, you must think well beyond the physical nature of your facilities or practices to recognize the experience resides in the network of people that surround and are connected to your organization, both near and far. This is at its heart, the essence of experience. As defined, experience is all that is perceived, understood and remembered. Those perceptions and memories and the stories through which they are shared are not collected at your doors, but rather they flourish in the sunlight and in the air of the streets, towns, and cities around you. The experience you provide is a community story and one you must be willing to acknowledge and address.

But I want to suggest another angle on community as well that is as equally important in all I have seen. That accomplishing the greatest in experience is a true community effort. It is not just something that can happen at admissions or discharge, or in your top performing units or departments. It must happen across the organization or system. More so I strongly believe the essence of patient experience thrives in much bigger ideas of community, which is why we have worked so hard in creating a true community of practice in The Beryl Institute itself.

I continue to be amazed by the generosity of spirit and sharing that has been afforded by the safe framework of our community. The realization that in healthcare if we are to be about the patient experience, holding our cards close to our chest or believing our "secret” process is our competitive advantage, is counter to what we are all trying to achieve. As much as I admire systems and organizations big and small for what they accomplish, I can tell you from my travels and encounters around the world, there is no one secret to success. What I have seen as the greatest resource comes back to the idea of that red beetle – community. It is in our willingness to share ideas and practice, to be open to exposing where we may have been challenged and celebrate and disseminate that which drove success, through which we can all impact patient experience.

This is not just a lesson for those in the delivery of care, but for those that support it; the resource providers and vendors, from survey companies to technology tools. It is their willingness to collaborate and share in community through which even greater things can happen. While their distinctions may be in variations of a theme in process and clearly more on level of service and the personalities involved, the reality is that they too play a part in this critical community conversation. From leadership to the frontline, from the future to patients and families themselves, it is the spirit of community and through the action of community that we can ensure the greatest in patient experience for all the patients, families and yes the very communities we serve.

As we approach Patient Experience Conference 2013, and we bring our virtual global community together physically for a few days this April, we hope that we are all reminded that it is through our connections that we have the opportunity for greatest impact. It is in our collective efforts and shared learning that we have the clearest path to success. My hope, and my vigorous invitation, is to join us, join this community and our efforts at The Beryl Institute as member or guest; as caregiver, physician, administrator, resource provider, patient or family member and to be in conversation on what we can accomplish as a community, together. The greatest of opportunities will emerge when we find our collective voice and there is so much yet to learn from one another.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Coaching and Developing Others.

Tags:  accountability  choice  community  community of practice  culture  defining patient experience  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  Leadership  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  patient stories  recognition  storytelling  voice 

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The Importance of Voice in Improving Patient Experience

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, February 5, 2013
Updated: Thursday, February 7, 2013

As The Beryl Institute has grown from a small group of committed individuals to a true global community, I have learned something very important. There is tremendous power in giving voice to ideas. Voice is not just the spoken word, but also the expression of opinion and thought, of creativity and passion, through multiple avenues. It is this essence of giving voice that rests at the core of excellence in patient experience itself.

My hope is that the Institute has reinforced that very fact. More than just a membership association or a research organization, the Institute’s strength in supporting those working to improve the patient experience has been in giving voice to the over 15,000 members and guests that engage in our community of practice. It was members and guests that provided input on the largest patient experience benchmarking study to date, it was members and guests who over 400 strong have contributed to creating the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge, it was members and guests who came together to author the definition of patient experience.

Why is this important? Because we have been built by and for our members in the way I have seen the most successful organizations address the patient experience itself. Those organizations have created the means to engage the range of voices they encompass. Those successful facilities and practices, systems and centers have made a commitment to intentionally listen and actively engage the voices of their community. They did this by:

  • Creating the opportunity for the voice of patients and families to be heard, not just in formal advisory roles, but also in common interactions. Those organizations that have incorporated patients and families as critical partners in the care experience excel at ensuring the best in service, quality and safety.
  • Providing the means for the voice of staff to be heard, not just through engagement surveys, but also as active contributors to an environment of continuous improvement. The ability to speak-up, offer ideas and even challenge the status quo without fear of repercussion has led to great improvements and important changes in the delivery of care.
  • Offering the chance for the voice of the community to be heard, more than just asking for contributions to foundations or causes. The engagement of community through strong presence and focused outreach shapes the nature of a healthcare organization, be it a rural community health center or a major urban hospital. In healthcare we hold a unique place in the communities we serve and play a role no other service provider can.

The importance of voice plays a central role in improving patient experience in healthcare settings around the world. In fact, in our most recent paper, Voices from the C-Suite: Perspectives on the Patient Experience, the executives we interviewed consistently talked about the importance of engaging the voice of patients, family and staff.

In no small part then is the importance of continuing to ensure the power of voice is included in all we do at the Institute. We have opened the year with a series of papers, including the Voices from the C-Suite mentioned above, that provide the opportunity for voices to be shared. This will be followed by Voices in Practice and ultimately Voices of Patients and Family, as we look to reinforce this simple, but significant tool and the lessons it offers in impacting patient experience.

Perhaps more importantly, we commit to ensuring the voice of the patient experience is heard. It is in our collective expression and sharing in which each individual and the organization they represent can learn and grow. It is ultimately in expressing our voice that we give the greatest gift to one another, it is in inviting that voice that we show the greatest of respect.

Improving the patient experience is not just an act, it is a critical dialogue; one that we must foster and encourage. Its impact is greatest when all voices are heard. Our commitment is to provide the space for that to continue. My question now is how will you use your voice to impact the patient experience and how will you engage the voices of others? This is one conversation we must never let end.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
Executive Director
The Beryl Institute

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Patient & Family Centeredness.

Tags:  culture  defining patient experience  employee engagement  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  patient engagement  Patient Experience  service excellence  voice 

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