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There’s No Place like Home…The Value of Connecting with Your Patient Experience Community

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Tuesday, June 13, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, June 13, 2017

I recently chatted with one of our members after she returned from another healthcare conference. While she enjoyed the event, she shared that the experience itself felt dramatically different than her time at our March Patient Experience Conference in Denver. I asked a few questions to try to understand what the difference was. The breakout sessions were great, the keynote speakers were inspiring, and it was a large crowd of other leaders in similar types of roles. Yet, she still felt something was lacking. Upon further reflection, she realized the missing element was the sense of community and emotional connection she experiences every year at The Beryl Institute conference.

Her comments reinforced feedback received after this year’s Patient Experience Conference. Participants said things such as, “Everyone was so kind and helpful…it was easy to meet people…it was so wonderful to be surrounded by like-minded people…we're all in this together!” These statements reflect things we hear often at the Institute, an appreciation for the welcoming and engaging community that has developed through a shared passion for building and sustaining the patient experience movement. 

Our community connects in many ways throughout the year – chatter on social media, regular discussions on listservs, and conversations through Topic Calls and Patient Advocacy Connection Calls. In recent months, we’ve also enjoyed watching dialogue between members explode in the chat box of our regular webinars where participants share where they’re logging in from, reconnect with old friends and tap into the tremendous wealth of knowledge that is represented in this patient experience community.

The virtual connections are powerful and a hallmark of The Beryl Institute. While these opportunities are invaluable, I would argue there is no replacement for spending time together in person. As the patient experience movement has grown, we’ve witnessed incredible connections between the leaders doing this work and an amazing energy and enthusiasm that comes when we gather together to share ideas, connect and learn. Our community believes patient experience is a foundational element of the overall healthcare experience, and there is something about getting together in person that inspires us to live and share that message.

At The Beryl Institute we continue to foster opportunities for face-to-face connections. Last week we announced the opening of the Call for Submissions for breakout sessions at Patient Experience Conference 2018 to be held April 16-18 in Chicago. We hope you will join us there and even consider submitting a proposal to share your patient experience successes.
 
But even before then we have many opportunities for you to engage face-to-face with patient experience peers. This fall we’ll hold Patient Experience Regional Roundtables in Canada, California, Louisiana and New York. Regional Roundtables are one-day programs bringing together the voices of healthcare leaders, staff, physicians, patients and families to convene, engage and expand the dialogue on improving patient experience. Through inspiring keynote sessions and working group discussion, participants leave with an expanded network, renewed energy and actionable ideas to support patient experience efforts in their own organizations.

We also have two upcoming Certified Patient Experience Professional (CPXP) preparation workshops. These are opportunities to gather with other patient experience leaders to not only network and share, but to prepare together for the CPXP exam. Community members will gather later this month in Chicago and in September in Los Angeles for full day courses reviewing the domains outlined in the job classification on which the CPXP examination is based. 

The Beryl Institute continues to be the global community of practice dedicated to improving the patient experience through collaboration and shared knowledge. We are a welcoming and engaging community. I am often reminded of an early Patient Experience Conference where a participant stood up and joyfully proclaimed “I have found my professional home!”  As a leader in the movement, we hope you view the Institute as your professional home, and we invite you to further connect with your patient experience family. 


Stacy Palmer, CPXP
Senior Vice President
The Beryl Institute 

Tags:  community of practice  Field of Patient Experience  healthcare  improving patient experience  leadership  networking  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  thought leadership 

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The Spirit of the PX Movement – Sharing, Learning and Improving Together

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Monday, December 12, 2016
Updated: Monday, December 12, 2016

After six years as a membership community focused on improving patient experience, we continue to be amazed and inspired by the generosity of our members and guests committed to this movement. The spirit of this work is illustrated perfectly by the willingness to share, learn and grow together.

Just last week we released a great example of this in action through the white paper, Guiding Principles for Patient Experience Excellence. We’re careful to always acknowledge there is no one recipe for improving patient experience, but we have identified eight themes consistent in organizations who have found success in this work. The paper shares those principles, reflects on why each is a critical consideration and, perhaps most importantly, highlights specific examples from 15 organizations who excel in one or more of these areas.

As in all the work shared through the Institute, the examples represent only a sample of the many approaches that could be tied to each principle. They are offered to spark thinking in ways others can move from concept to action. It’s the willingness of these organizations to share their successes that fuels that thinking for others.

The gifting of knowledge and experiences has helped to build the field of patient experience and establishes both credibility and accountability for our efforts. This year our sister organization, Patient Experience Institute, recognized the first three classes of Certified Patient Experience Professionals (CPXPs), an incredible statement and stride for the movement. We continue to see this work validated and see our community eager to spread the word on the importance of addressing experience excellence and sharing successes and challenges encountered along the way.

We wholeheartedly offer thanks to every individual and organization who contributed to this work over the past year. Thank you for every case study shared, On the Road visit or regional roundtable hosted, webinar or conference session presented, ListServ email sent, topic call or connection call attended and learning bite delivered. It’s through these and other collective efforts that we can truly shape this movement and positively impact the experiences of patients, families and caregivers.

Interested in learning more about how you can personally contribute to the community in 2017? Visit http://www.theberylinstitute.org/?page=CONNECTIONIDEAS.

 

Stacy Palmer, CPXP
Senior Vice President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  accountability  collaboration  community  community of practice  engagement  Field of Patient Experience  healthcare  improving patient experience  networking  patient experience  thought leadership 

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Supporting the Expanding Field of Patient Experience

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Thursday, June 9, 2016
Updated: Thursday, June 9, 2016

This week we opened the call for submissions for Patient Experience Conference 2017. It will mark the seventh official year for this event, the annual gathering bringing together the collective voices of healthcare professionals and patients/families across the globe to convene, engage in and expand the dialogue on improving patient experience. 

Each year we’ve seen significant increases is conference participation, with almost 1,000 people gathering in Dallas this past April to share, learn and network with one another. Similarly The Beryl Institute community itself continues to grow, now made up of over 45,000 members and guests from 55 countries. We believe this growth signifies the expansion of the patient experience movement. Leaders are realizing a focus on experience is a necessity for survival in the ever-changing healthcare environment.

We’ve watched the field develop with some organizations now appointing Chief Experience Officers to guide efforts and strategy. Patient Experience Institute, a sister organization of The Beryl Institute, has established a formal designation for Certified Patient Experience Professionals – and over 140 organizations now have one or more CPXPs on staff. Hundreds of individuals are expanding their professional development through the PX Body of Knowledge certificate programs. And Patient Experience Week was established to celebrate those who positively impact experience every day. 

Without a doubt, the field of patient experience is expanding.

This expansion continues to change the dynamics of The Beryl Institute Community. When we began as a membership organization in late 2010, most of our members were just getting started on their patient experience journeys. They were incredibly willing to share the successes and struggles along the way – which led to the abundance of community-developed content that exists and continues to grow today.

While we’ll always offer resources, support and encouragement to those beginning their efforts, we must continue to elevate the conversation to also support those further along on their journeys. Many of you are now looking to the community for information on how you can take things to the next level. How do you sustain your programs? What can you do to develop deeper engagement opportunities with patients and family members? How can you bring down silos that exist within your organization? How do you integrate social media into experience efforts?

The expansion of the field and our commitment to provide the breadth and levels of content needed to support the community led us to a significant change in the conference call for submissions process for 2017. As you complete the submission form for a standard breakout, mini session or poster – and we invite you to consider doing so – you’ll be asked to identify the development stage for your content, specifically your submission is ideal for individuals with:

  • Minimal knowledge and experience. Looking for some basic information, key principles and "how to’s” on the subject.
  • Working knowledge and some proven experience. Looking for breath or depth in the subject, how to sustain and engage others and/or dealing with resistance to change on the subject. 
  • Authoritative knowledge and proven success. Looking for advanced knowledge and examples to evolve their understanding and practice on the subject. 

This is the scale our Learning and Professional Development team considers regularly as they develop content for our webinars, topic calls and other resources, and we're excited to now apply this process to Patient Experience Conference. This information will guide our volunteer reviewers and conference planning committee to develop a well-balanced program that meets the needs of participants at all levels. We’ll identify sessions as beginning, intermediate or advanced so you can make the most-informed choices on what sessions you will attend to customize your learning experience. 

It’s important to acknowledge, however, that levels of learning can be both subjective and cyclical. Organizations who once excelled at certain facets of patient experience may find themselves slipping in that area over time and in need of a basic refresher. And organizations just beginning a patient experience journey might have certain areas in which they already perform well ahead of the curve. There will always be a need to support all levels of development and we are committed to sharing that breadth of resources.  We thank you in advance for your contributions to the community. Sharing your story and knowledge truly represents the core idea that we are ALL the Patient Experience!


Stacy Palmer
Vice President, Strategy and Member Experience 
The Beryl Institute
 

Tags:  collaboration  commitment  community  community of practice  engagement  Field of Patient Experience  global healthcare  healthcare  improving patient experience  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  service excellence 

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When the Patient Experience becomes more Personal

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Wednesday, March 2, 2016

We have an incredibly passionate community at The Beryl Institute. I know for many that passion has been fueled by personal experiences that drove them to be part of this work. Others have been inspired to join the patient experience movement to spread what they believe is the right thing to do for those we serve. And sometimes while doing this work they have encountered their own life experiences, whether small bumps in the road or larger life-changing events, that reinforced the importance of patient experience and provided new perspective to guide their efforts.

Last year I experienced this firsthand when my daughter, Maya, dislocated and fractured her elbow while cheerleading. She had an emergency reduction surgery the night of the accident to put her elbow back in place and a second surgery a few days later to insert a screw to correct the fracture. All went well, but they decided to keep her overnight to help control her pain and that one night provided an incredible opportunity for reflection and perspective for me as a person who has built a career in patient experience. 

While I work everyday to share stories and practices of how our community works to improve the healthcare experience, I’ve been fortunate to have very few patient or family experiences myself. It’s amazing how your perspective intensifies when you’re sitting inside a hospital room observing the care of a loved one.

A few ideas were reinforced for me that night and, as simple as they are, I believe they are important considerations as we address overall experience.

  • Patients (and those who love and care for them) are incredibly vulnerable in a healthcare setting. Maya and I are pretty confident in our regular routines, but we were a bit clueless at the hospital – even with simple things such as ordering meals and turning on the TV. More significantly, we were at the hands of the staff to know what medicines she should have, if her body was reacting as it should to the surgery and how to best control the pain. We had to trust the healthcare team. As a children’s hospital, I must acknowledge they had several things in place that helped Maya feel more comfortable. Volunteers brought her a stuffed lamb and they let her select from a fun collection of super soft blankets to use while there that she could also take home. The hospital even had a Build-a-Bear Workshop on site, which I believe was the key motivator in getting her walking around post-surgery. Any steps, however large or small, an organization can to take to comfort and ease the feeling of vulnerability can have a significant impact.  
  • Healthcare workers are human. I think people often place doctors and nurses on pedestals in their minds assuming they should have perfect accuracy, bedside manners and responsiveness. While Maya had some great people caring for her, I was quickly reminded they were human. They had varied levels of experience, focus and relationship skills. As humans they also had their own lives that did have an impact on how they cared for my daughter – maybe stresses at home, conflict with co-workers or even their own health challenges. Regardless of how dedicated and professional, humans make mistakes. I came to appreciate all the checks and balances they implemented to help prevent that. At first I was a little disturbed by the redundant questions like “What is your name? Birthday? Any allergies?” But as I reminded myself the staff were each caring for multiple patients, I learned to appreciate their diligence to make sure everything matched up. I encourage healthcare workers to explain the needs for these steps to patients as this goes a long way in giving them confidence in their healthcare team.
  • Patients need advocates. The vulnerability and realization that the staff treating Maya were human reinforced a point that sometimes gets overlooked in healthcare – the important role of the caregiver. A few years ago a co-worker’s husband was in the hospital and she refused to leave his side. As much as she respected the healthcare team caring for him, she realized no one had his best interest at heart as much as she did. She was there to be sure they gave him the right medicines, at the right times and in the right amounts. She kept a journal of his condition and symptoms to share with the doctor, and she was there to be sure he ate, had food choices he liked and any assistance he needed. After being in the hospital with Maya for just one night, I understood her point completely, and not just because Maya was 11. The caregiver can play a vital role in helping ensure quality, safety and experience are what they should be in all care settings.

Maya was lucky that her hospital stay was short and she was quickly on the road to recovery. Being with her that night enriched my perspective and purpose, both as a mom caring for a child and as a professional committed to help make the healthcare experience the best it can be for everyone.

We are currently working on a white paper at the Institute that will share the stories of many patient experience leaders who, in the face of a personal health experience – however large or small, shifted their perspective from PX leader to patient or patient’s family member. If you are willing to share your story, we encourage you to participate in this project. 

Stacy Palmer
Vice President, Strategy and Member Experience
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  choice  community  engagement  Field of Patient Experience  improving patient experience  patient  patient and family  patient engagement  Patient Experience  perception  service excellence  voice 

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How Will You Invest in Patient Experience in 2016?

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Tuesday, December 1, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, December 1, 2015

We recently celebrated our first five years as a community of practice and looked back, somewhat in awe, at the incredible growth of this organization over such a short time. The Beryl Institute is now a global community of almost 40,000 individuals passionate about improving the healthcare experience for patients, families and caregivers.

The momentum continues, as does the realization that organizations are making significant investments in time, energy and dollars to ensure they are prepared to deliver the best possible patient experience. We see these investments in many forms from hiring teams to training leaders and staff to building and supporting cultures of excellence.

As we shared in the 2015 State of Patient Experience Benchmarking study, senior patient experience leadership and staff investment is growing with 42% of respondents having a Chief Experience Officer (or comparable position) compared to only 22% two years ago.  Along with that, the size of patient experience teams is growing; 33% of organizations reported having five or more staff members supporting patient experience efforts. 

The Beryl Institute community reflects this trend as well. This year over 200 organizations will invest in institutional membership – meaning they provide unlimited access to the Institute’s white papers, webinars, topic calls, learning bites, etc. to everyone within their facility. They are making a statement that people in ALL roles impact the patient experience and should have access to research and collaboration that will assist their efforts.

We have also seen tremendous interest in learning and professional development programs intended to train patient experience leaders and other staff. We recently increased our virtual classroom offerings in the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge courses to support growing participation in the community-developed program that provides Certificates in Patient Experience Leadership and Patient Advocacy.

Patient Experience Conference had its largest attendance to date this year and we were honored to partner with member organizations to host sold out Regional Roundtable events in San Francisco, Charlotte and Minneapolis. Our community is eager to gain (and share) knowledge and to invest in their personal career growth. In fact, today our sister organization, Patient Experience Institute, will offer the first testing opportunity for those hoping to earn their CPXP, the professional certification for Patient Experience Leaders.

While we’re excited to celebrate the five-year milestone, we acknowledge how much work is still to be done. We imagine (and hope to help inspire) a world where all healthcare organizations appreciate the power and impact of patient experience efforts and make without hesitation the investments necessary to be the best they can be for patients and families.

Earlier this year we released Our Stand, a list of guiding principles we’ve identified in our five years of leading this work that can have significant impact on patient experience success. I share them again as a reminder as you evaluate your own efforts and consider what investment opportunities make sense to support your specific needs.

We believe organizations and systems committed to providing the best in experience WILL:

  • Identify and support accountable leadership with committed time and focused intent to shape and guide experience strategy
  • Establish and reinforce a strong, vibrant and positive organizational culture and all it comprises
  • Develop a formal definition for what experience is to their organization
  • Implement a defined process for continuous patient and family input and engagement
  • Engage all voices in driving comprehensive, systemic and lasting solutions
  • Look beyond clinical experience of care to all interactions and touch points
  • Focus on alignment across all segments of the continuum and the spaces in between
  • Encompass both a focus on healing and a commitment to well-being

As you prepare for the coming year I challenge you to reflect on your organization’s commitment to experience improvement. Where are you exceling and where are your opportunities to do even more for your patients, families, caregivers and staff? Our patient experience community is here to support your journey and I encourage you to take full advantage of the incredible resources and knowledge available. 

Wishing you a wonderful holiday season and a successful New Year!

 

Stacy Palmer
Vice President, Strategy and Member Experience
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  body of knowledge  certification  collaboration  community of practice  Continuum of Care  culture  employee engagement  Field of Patient Experience  global healthcare  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  Interactions  Leadership  Nurse Leadership  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  Regional Roundtable  service excellence 

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Expanding the dialogue on experience excellence to long term care

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, September 2, 2014
Updated: Monday, September 1, 2014

When we first developed the definition for patient experience with a group of contributing healthcare leaders, four themes emerged as central to our discussion and ultimately to the definition itself – the sum of all interactions, shaped by an organization’s culture, that influence patient perceptions across the continuum of care. These themes shaped the fundamentals for action in providing the best in experience and I still see them as central and imperative across healthcare settings today.

Experience efforts are shaped through the interactions of all individuals involved and grounded in the organization’s culture through which they are delivered. It is the actions of all participants in the care experience – caregivers, support teams, patients and family members alike – that ultimately influence the perceptions of experience and create the lasting impact (and I suggest ripple effect) that each experience has. Experience is a partnership with patients, residents and families, not a doing to, and these words reinforce this critical point.

It is the last element of the definition that is also perhaps the most easily accepted: across the continuum of care. As the patient experience movement has flourished, there has been growing recognition that experience stretches well beyond the four walls of any clinical encounter or the physical structures of the acute care setting. In fact, the ideas of experience, in variations of language including patient, resident or person-centeredness, have permeated the wide array of care experiences one can have in healthcare today. This idea may be no better reinforced than the focus on the experience of individuals in long-term care.

The effort to provide a strong and positive experience for individuals in long-term care is not a new concept. This idea has been addressed in the dialogues of great institutions such as the former Picker Institute and now via Planetree and through organizations such as the Pioneer Network, Leading Age and the American Health Care Association (AHCA). Partly driven by policy, such as we have seen sweep the US healthcare system in other segments of the continuum with the CAHPS efforts, and framed by what we know to be the right thing to do, long-term care has long been focused on the elements of resident quality, safety and service and the built environment to ensure the best for those in their care.

There is a growing understanding in all environments, that aside from the right thing to do for those in our care, or even a must do, there is also increasing policy focus and requirements that not only measure action, but also tie financial implications to them. Yes, we must acknowledge the financial implications of this effort as well, including the reality that individuals in the healthcare system at all points on the continuum are now consumers – people carefully select doctors, they make decisions on which hospitals to seek care and they look long and hard at the options in selecting a location for a parent or loved one to reside for long-term care needs.

If we accept choice is a factor now in healthcare, then experience matters. In focusing on the continuum of care, it matters to the patients, residents, people in our care, it matters to their families and it matters to all who deliver care as well. It is for this reason we continue to evolve our work at The Beryl institute to expand the experience conversation to all points on the continuum of care and to acknowledge the opportunities at the moments of care transition as well.

We have worked to engage broader voices in the physician practice setting by exploring how experience is being addressed by physician clinics and groups and our events are expanding to include greater dialogue and content on the important practices taking place in the ambulatory and outpatient settings. With equal focus (and the support of energized and committed members of our community), we are embarking in expanding our efforts to address experience in the long-term care setting as well. In the coming months, through Patient Experience Conference 2015 and beyond, we will work to collaborate with leading thinkers and organizations to reinforce and expand the critical conversation of experience in the long-term care environment. This will include papers, webinars, conference sessions and expanding research into this area of the continuum.

We hope through these efforts and partnerships we can support the critical dialogue of experience at all points on the care continuum. We will strive to continue our growth as a community encouraging and supporting the dialogue among individuals impacting each touch point in the care experience. If we maintain that experience as defined truly crosses the continuum of care, not only is this a critical effort to take on, it is a must do in ensuring that the experience conversation – the critical confluence of quality, safety and service and the fundamental considerations of people, process and place – engages all and includes all voices. We are excited by this next stage of the experience movement and invite and encourage your thoughts, ideas and participation.

Jason. A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute 

Tags:  choice  community of practice  Continuum of Care  culture  defining patient experience  Field of Patient Experience  HCAHPS  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  Interactions  long term care  patient  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  service excellence  voice 

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Become a Leader in the Patient Experience Movement

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Tuesday, August 5, 2014
Updated: Tuesday, August 5, 2014

I recently received a note from a new member who is early in her career and looking for ways to maximize her membership to get "plugged in” to the Institute and gain credibility within the patient experience community. We get questions like this often. While passionate about getting involved in the patient experience movement, many of our members aren’t quite sure how to get started.

To help, I want to share the suggestions I gave her. I believe they are applicable for patient experience leaders at any stage. First, leadership is not about years of experience. It’s about influence (and willingness to contribute). While healthcare has been around for centuries, a focused patient experience movement is still taking shape at all levels of healthcare organizations. To "plug in” and be a leader, you need to do one thing – share.

The power of sharing is what The Beryl Institute community is built upon and in doing so people reap even greater benefits themselves. Leadership in our movement is grounded in a generosity of spirit and contribution, collaboration and openness.

 The Beryl Institute offers many ways for you to share and be active participants in the patient experience movement.

  • Get engaged in the conversation. That's the best way to share what you're doing and learn from others. We have Patient Experience Leaders and Patient Advocacy listservs that are very active. Be sure to sign up for those and respond to questions and/or pose your own. And when you find something that’s successful in your organization – share it through a case study.

  • Attend a live event. We have a very engaged, energetic community and they love meeting and brainstorming with new people. It's also a great chance to find a mentor. We have two Regional Roundtables coming up in October - one in Boston and one in Seattle. And Patient Experience Conference 2015 will be April 8-10, 2015 in Dallas. If travel is a concern, you can talk to other members via phone on our monthly topic calls.

  • Immerse yourself in the PX Body of Knowledge (BOK). It's a community-driven framework highlighting the 15 domains critical for an effective PX leader. We currently have courses available for 8 of the 15 domains with the other 7 coming soon. You can gain lots of information from other resources available through your membership, but I always recommend the BOK courses to people looking to establish a solid foundation.

One of our members recently commented that he views his involvement with The Beryl Institute as much more than a membership. He believes his engagement is a bigger statement supporting the patient experience movement. His outlook exemplifies the passion we see everyday from the community.

In fact, I am constantly amazed by the eagerness of our members to contribute, get involved and truly become leaders in the movement. With over 60 members on our boards and councils, subgroups like the Patient Advocacy and Physician communities, and regular contributors to our guest blog, case studies and On the Road program, those desiring to be thought leaders in this critical movement have a place. You just need to choose to engage.

And for the many of you already involved in The Beryl Institute who want to do even more to support the movement, my advice to you is the same: share. One of the greatest ways to be a leader in the patient experience movement is to pass along a story, case study, research report or other resource that might inspire those around you to look at their roles differently, to see the impact they can have on creating the best possible experience for patients, families and caregivers. Simply, share. 

"Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap but by the seeds that you plant.”  - Robert Louis Stevenson


Stacy Palmer

Vice President, Strategy and Member Experience
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  community of practice  Field of Patient Experience  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  Leadership  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  service excellence  thought leadership 

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How Will You Inspire the Patient Experience Movement? Four Considerations for 2014

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Tuesday, January 14, 2014

I am inspired. The New Year has arrived with great energy at The Beryl Institute. We start 2014 as a global community of practice of over 20,000 professionals, focused without hesitation on ensuring the best in experience for patients, families and one another in healthcare.

I am inspired by the continued commitments expressed for this work: by The Beryl Institute’s Patient Experience Scholars who met recently to share their research and reinforce their willingness to encourage and support others; by the members of the Global Patient & Family Advisory Council who want to influence how patients and family members are heard and engaged in making a profound difference in healthcare; by the many contributing to the development of the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge courses soon to be available to the community; and by many more.

I am inspired by how in the first two weeks of a new year, such commitment and intent can emerge, built on all that has come before and focused with purpose on the great opportunities ahead. As I reflect on this idea, a question emerged and perhaps a challenge for each of us to consider:

How will you inspire the patient experience movement in the year ahead?

I pose this question with the hope that actions and considerations from the smallest moments of unparalleled kindness to the largest strategic triumphs all find room to take root and grow. Inspiration comes in all shapes and sizes, but in this diversity it has strong commonalities – it causes us to feel a sense of something special and powerful. It provides a boundless energy to influence, lead, change and make a difference. This is an exciting prospect in seeing that each of us can choose to have an impact. And while no two actions will be exactly alike, I do want to offer a few thoughts on how you can continue to frame your patient experience efforts to inspire yourself and others.

As we return to the definition of patient experience, I continue to experience its relevance time-and-time again in the application of these words to central actions associated with excellence. In reviewing its words – the sum of all interactions, shaped by an organization’s culture, that influence patient perceptions, across the continuum of care – I again see clear directions on moving your own experience efforts forward. They include:

1. Reinforce strategic focus. Patient experience has proven itself to be a relevant part of the healthcare conversation. It has surpassed the challenges of being dubbed a fad; it too has shown it has stronger legs than just serving as a policy framework. Experience is a central strategic pillar to organizational performance and success. Patient Experience in its broadest sense should be a clear and transparent component of every healthcare organization’s strategy.

2. Clarify and map your critical interactions. Experience doesn’t happen on billboards or in espoused actions, it happens at the most personal moments, at those points of engagement between one individual and another. The ultimate tool in patient experience improvement is your self, your heart, your hands and arms, your minds, your compassion and your common sense. We have a huge opportunity to map the interactions that occur on the patient path to ensure we consider the most effective way to respond at every touch point.

3. Model desired behaviors. Simply put, if interactions drive experience, then the behaviors that comprise them are the conduits that direct these interactions in one way or another. Organizational culture is shaped by behaviors, they represent the people, presence and purpose of an organization overall and no slogan, policy or program will trump the power of individual behavior. We must model, observe, coach and improve constantly to impact experience outcomes.

4. Expand your listening. As we ended 2013 exploring the Voices of Measurement, we learned that the power of data is only as valid as what we choose to do with it. Collection or reporting data for the sake of data misses the opportunity for learning and relevant action. To capitalize on the value of the voices that surround us in healthcare we must expand our listening. Experience is measured first in the direct voices of healthcare consumers, who remain our most significant mirror into our own efforts, but it is also found in the voices of our peers and colleagues. We are only capable of achieving our strategy through our people. They are much more than pawns to direct, but rather living resources accountable for ensuring excellence.

Perhaps these ideas will help spark your own thoughts on how you will choose to inspire the patient experience movement. Regardless of which direction you go, I hope you recognize the power that exists in your own personal choice and the ability to impact the experience of the person that is coming next. The year ahead can and should be about a great many things both personally and professionally. My hope is that you find you can and will be an inspiration in your efforts. This cause is too great for your efforts to be anything less. Now the question remains, what will you do? I look forward to your updates with great anticipation.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  accountability  Advocacy  body of knowledge  choice  community of practice  consumer advocacy  Continuum of Care  culture  defining patient experience  employee engagement  Field of Patient Experience  global defining patient experience  global healthcare  HCAHPS  healthcare  improving patient experience  Interaction  Interactions  patient  patient engagement  Patient Experience  service excellence  thought leadership  voice 

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Reflecting on The Patient Experience Movement: The Power of Voices and Collaboration

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Wednesday, December 18, 2013
Updated: Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Patient Experience - Voices in CollaborationAs we stand at the end of each year, we tend to look back at all that led us to this moment and anticipate all that lies ahead. I stand here now with all of you that comprise our patient experience community, who live and breathe in your every action this patient experience movement, and can say without hesitation that together we have accomplished great things and together there are even more powerful moments to come.

 

This year has exemplified our core values at The Beryl Institute – the importance of community and the integral role of collaboration. We have worked to reinforce the true power of engaging all voices in the patient experience conversation. This gathering of voices has seen our patient experience community grow from 11,000 to 20,000 members and guests this year alone, representing over 45 countries. This gathering of voices has led to a year in which the foundational ideas of this movement have been reinforced and solidified. In our commitment to expand access to the greatest breadth and depth of individuals across healthcare we recently expanded our membership framework to provide access to all associates in any healthcare facility. These Institutional memberships enable staff at all levels, in all roles, across the range of healthcare organizations to engage, to learn and to lead in their own environments.

 

In expanding the conversation on voice itself, this year has been shaped by the Voices of Patient Experience series in which we heard from the C-Suite, front-line practice, students across healthcare disciplines, physicians, patients and families and those measuring the impact of our patient experience efforts. This collection of voices served to complement the many others that contributed to learning and sharing of ideas via webinars and case studies, Patient Experience Conference presentations and On the Road visits. Hundreds of you added your thoughts to the conversation via these and other outlets. This open sense of sharing, of giving, of collaboration has allowed the patient experience movement to thrive.

 

The voices series also raised a significant awareness for the community; to be an organization truly committed to patient experience, we had to move beyond the talk about what we do "to” patients and families, and reinforce an unwavering commitment to do "with”. This partnership in care underlines the very intent of the Institute to provide a place to learn from one another, and it was clear that included the voices of patients and families themselves. This led us to establish the Global Patient & Family Advisory Council, comprised of leading patient and family thinkers, writers, speakers and activists. It also had us collaborate with IHI at the 2013 National Forum to support the "Patient is In” Booth in which patients and family members could share input and ideas with forum participants. These voices remind us of the boundless value of this partnership in patient experience improvement.

 

The expansion of voices also led to the 2ndState of Patient Experience Study, the largest conducted to date on patient experience efforts, and revealed some interesting trends in the both the focus, intent and awareness of patient experience efforts. Yet, while the movement continues to push on, less than 50% of U.S. hospitals have yet to formally define patient experience for themselves. We still have great opportunities to educate and learn from one another.

 

This awareness made it only natural that we expand our efforts overall on the professional development of patient experience champions, furthering the work on the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge with domain outlines and the anticipated release of the domain courses in 2014. As a community you reinforced your desire and the greater need to shape this work in ways that will allow each and every one of us to grow stronger. The year ahead brings even more exciting work on this front.

 

In a recent Hospital Impact blog I mentioned my great excitement about the growth of the patient experience family overall, from new sister organizations to research entities focusing on this area, to critical gatherings in numerous places in support of this important discussion. We will continue to support and reinforce the value of all these efforts and maintain that in collaboration we all win in this movement. We remain committed to serving as a hub and connector of the many voices focused on this effort and keep our arms open for the opportunities for further collaboration.

 

This very idea led to us to begin conversations with and engage in a formal collaboration with the Society for Healthcare Consumer Advocacy (SHCA) and its 40 years of incredible history and commitment to patient voice, rights and advocacy. A strong and storied organization whose roots can be found at the very start of the patient experience movement, SHCA felt they found a home for their future with The Beryl Institute, but I would say while the container is the Institute, the home is the community of peers, of leaders and teachers, of resource providers and caregivers, of patients and families who make up this growing professional home for so many. The integration with SHCA and the purposeful collaboration with a growing number of organizations committed to this cause help reinforce the power that collaboration itself brings to this conversation.

 

I would be remiss if I did not add a personal note to this reflection on the year, that as I stood on stage to close Patient Experience Conference 2013 and received the call that I needed to rush home for the delivery of my son, I shifted abruptly from champion and advocate for a movement to a family member surround by a healthcare system still admittedly learning itself. My eyes were opened, not only by the magic of the birth of a child, but of a family member watching your loved ones cared for, your new child handled, complications managed and tense moments relieved. We must not forget we are all patients and family members and need to continue our work as such.

 

The work you do may at times seem like small gestures, part of your standard process or even done automatically as a seasoned veteran, but to a patient or family member you are providing an incredible gesture of service, of quality, of safety – of experience. In every moment we have the choice to create the experience for our patients and their families. And every moment each of you as members of this community, of this movement, have that choice as well…to engage, to learn, to contribute, and to encourage the involvement of others.

 

You see this is your community, it is built on the power of your voices, it is driven by the collaboration we find with one another and it is from that place that we look to the new year knowing that the greatest opportunities still lie ahead. Thank you for your contributions, support and leadership. May you have a healthy and happy holiday and be ready with great excitement for all the New Year will bring.

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Related Body of Knowledge courses: Communication.

Tags:  Advocacy  body of knowledge  community of practice  consumer advocacy  defining patient experience  Field of Patient Experience  improving patient experience  partnership  Patient Experience  thought leadership  voice 

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The Patient Experience Must Be Owned By All: Welcoming the Society of Healthcare Consumer Advocacy

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Friday, November 22, 2013
Updated: Friday, November 22, 2013

In The Beryl Institute’s recent research report – The State of Patient Experience in American Hospitals 2013 – I noted in conclusion that the state of patient experience is growing stronger every day because of the many voices committed to this work. I too reinforced my belief that a patient experience movement is afoot, one that requires continuous and focused efforts and one that should be grounded in and built upon collaboration and alignment versus competition or the desire to stake a claim.

This idea rests at the very core of the global community of practice we have built at The Beryl Institute. We do not claim to own the patient experience, but rather to be a place where people can gather together to share what is best in what they are working to accomplish. Our philosophy has been and will remain that through collaboration not just great, but greater things can happen. 

It is in this very spirit of collaboration that I am excited to share the bridging of two great organizations to expand the alignment and dialogue on patient experience improvement. We have been in discussion with and will soon be welcoming the Society for Healthcare Consumer Advocacy (SHCA) into The Beryl Institute community. After an incredible 40 year history and supportive home with the American Hospital Association (AHA), our three organizations – The Beryl Institute, SCHA and AHA – saw great potential in supporting the next 40 years and beyond for SHCA within the Institute (You can read a letter from all of SHCA’s Past Board Presidents here). As of January 1, 2014, our communities will align to continue to expand the patient experience conversation and in doing so model the power of coming together in this critical dialogue.

More details will soon be available around this exciting next step in the history of focus on patient advocacy and more broadly patient experience improvement, but suffice it to say, the commitment to engaging all voices and growing those engaged in this important work is top of mind for us all. I am excited and proud to welcome the SHCA community to The Beryl Institute family as their new professional home and in doing so reiterate the very critical message I share here. That it is in coming together, not attempts at market distinction, in which the greatest outcomes are possible. 

I have watched in recent years as patient experience has moved from an emerging term to an active conversation at the center of policy and now financial focus. I have also seen a great game of ownership being played out. Much like one might have experienced during the gold rush, claiming their small bit of mountain stream to pan for hours, days or more in search of that one bright speck, many organizations – some well established, and some quite new – have all worked on positioning for their piece of the pie.

While I am a true believer in free enterprise and recognize the great potential for market savvy in this new world of healthcare, I also believe we have something bigger we are attempting to do in working towards patient experience excellence. It is in the bringing together of disparate thoughts or competing ideas, be they those of resource providers of similar services or healthcare organizations occupying the same market, in which the greatest outcomes can be realized. You see no one organization owns the patient experience, yet we in healthcare must all take ownership of it.

For this reason we have worked to bring the many voices together, for as I asserted above, this is where the strength of our work and its impact rests. This idea has been realized in the Institute’s Regional Roundtables where market "competitors” join together in sharing thoughts and crafting shared plans focused on improvement. It has been realized at Patient Experience Conference where numerous resource providers join in and engage in support of a true, independent community dialogue. It is seen in the willingness of some of the largest players in experience measurement to come together to share ideas between the covers of our soon to be released paper on the Voices of Measurement.

If we are to make the greatest differences in the lives of our patients, families, peers and community we must be open to the idea that above all else through collaboration and coordinated effort profound possibility exists for improvement and sustained impact. And while by my very words, I cannot claim The Beryl Institute is the only place this can or will be done, I do hope and in fact commit that we will continue to stand for the bringing together of all ideas, of every voice and of each hope in each and everything we do. As a community of practice it is our calling, at The Beryl Institute it is our cause and we are so very excited to see (and hopefully be a catalyst in) the patient experience family continuing to grow.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  Advocacy  AHA  body of knowledge  choice  community of practice  consumer advocacy  Continuum of Care  Field of Patient Experience  global healthcare  healthcare  Interactions  Leadership  patient advocac  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  perception  SHCA  thought leadership  voice 

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