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The Beryl Institute invites members and guests to submit posts on patient experience related topics. For guidelines and information on submitting a post for consideration, contact michelle.garrison@theberylinstitute.org.

 

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Top tags: patient experience  healthcare  patient  Leadership  HCAHPS  culture  patient engagement  physician  communication  family engagement  healing  Hospital  survey  caregiver  community  empathy  employee engagement  pediatric  perception  person-centered care  physicians  voice  collaboration  compassion  consumerism  Continuum of Care  Customer Service  data  experience  family 

How Much Does Culture Matter in Today’s Healthcare Environment?

Posted By Katie Owens, Monday, April 17, 2017
Updated: Wednesday, April 12, 2017

What is culture? Culture can consist of many different elements in healthcare. From the way things are done in the organization. The shared relationships among people which dictate how they behave. To a set of shared beliefs and values. Each belief (while uniquely described by many) universally acknowledges that culture is an important part of the fabric of their organization.

Despite the fact that many people have conviction that organizational culture will either enable an organization’s success or serve as a barrier to achieving outcomes, sometimes broaching the subject of Culture can cause leaders or front line team members to shy away. Culture can feel messy, hard and inconvenient. We may be proud of some aspects of our culture but disappointed in others. Our team sought to find evidence outside of anecdote and theory to help leaders understand the role culture plays in creating excellence. That query led us to conduct our recent study demonstrated that culture does impact outcomes. The two big learnings we had conducting our study published in the Journal of Healthcare Leadership is that:

First, high performing cultures are more likely to do better than low performing cultures on key balanced scorecard metrics: Employee and Physician Engagement, Patient Experience, Value-Based Purchasing and Turnover. These cultures did not outperform by a small margin but a margin of magnitude and statistical significance (see Video on Culture Imperative). In other words, our team found that culture is not “nice to have” but critical to create demonstrable outcomes.

Second, engaging your employees in your culture is the most powerful step to create positive results. Your workforce is the lifeblood of your organizational culture: their engagement, relationships with leadership and each other and commitment to your mission. We found four key levers that are more likely to support achievement of outcomes:

  • The extent to which patients are treated as valued customers.
  • You find that your values are very similar to the values of this organization.
  • You feel that being a member of this organization is very rewarding.
  • You are proud to be a part of this organization.

There is no question healthcare leaders, staff and physicians are perservering day in and day out to provide the very best care to patients despite a myriad of challenges. Our teams are craving cultures that give them a sense of purpose and joy. As we work to create a “new normal” that equips our organization to provide person-centered excellence across the continuum of care, our findings indicate that leaders should pay attention to culture and actively steer workforce engagement to create employee pride, a focus on the customer and shared values.

Katie Owens, MHA is Vice President of HealthStream Engagement Institute, a HealthStream Company. Katie is a highly regarded thought leader in the healthcare industry who is a national speaker, executive coach and facilitator of leadership. Katie is founder of Lumen, a monthly podcast dedicated to shining a light on the bright spots where excellence happens in healthcare. KatieOwens.org

Tags:  culture  employee engagement  improving patient experience  metrics  physician engagement 

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Bedside Shift Report from the Patient’s Perspective

Posted By Brooke Billingsley, Friday, March 17, 2017
Updated: Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Patients spend little time thinking about the nurse’s list of tasks to complete. They aren’t aware of the excellent job their nurse did charting their care, how staff made sure safety precautions were adhered to or what it took to provide a meal on time. 

Patients are functioning on an entirely different level. They are focusing on what they can control – which is very little – and how external forces are making it easier or harder to achieve their goals of getting better and getting out of the hospital. What registers with patients is ‘touch’ – those memorable moments in which staff made a genuine effort to connect with patients.

A positive transformation occurs in a patient’s perception of their care when touch is added to a task. That is certainly true with the Bedside Shift Report.

The BSSR is often misunderstood because it is seen as time consuming, does require effort, and for some, is uncomfortable. But the BSSR must be seen from the patient’s perspective to be fully appreciated. The benefits and value to the patient far outweigh the arguments against. 

Consider what the patient sees when a fully functioning Bedside Shift Report is conducted:

  • The BSSR allows patients to hear and physically experience how committed the organization is to their care and illustrates how unique and important their case is.
  • Patients are very conscious of how staff interacts with one another through conversations and body language. The BSSR presents an opportunity to show unity and camaraderie, which patients ultimately associate with good care.
  • Staff has the opportunity to give patients the assurance that they will receive the same great care from the new nurse as the previous nurse. It also increases the chance for mutual praise and promotion of the rest of the team.
  • Because the Bedside Shift Report is not a patient expectation (they are not likely to say, “Hey, I think I should be in on that get together in the hallway,”) the act itself is (novel) and memorable lending itself to increased satisfaction.
  • The BSSR demonstrates that time spent with the patient has value, which in turn shows respect for patients and their participation.
  • Adding some personality to the process completes the recipe for a guaranteed touch opportunity.

There are a few additional things you should consider in making the transition to a Bedside Shift Report a successful one.

  • Have a plan to determine what would be most beneficial for the patient to know and work out the details of the information exchange.
  • Practice until it feels comfortable. In time this should become second nature.
  • Communicate in a way that is most understandable to the patient.
  • If the patient is not able to participate, include family if they are present.

And finally, when you formally conclude your time with your patients, the BSSR shows that you care enough to say good-bye adding touch to a required task.

Brooke Billingsley is the CEO at Task To Touch™ e-Learning & Perception Strategies, Inc. a healthcare perception research company. Brooke is a speaker, consultant and author.

Tags:  bedside shift report  communication  improving patient experience  our  perception 

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Reflecting Back on The Patient Experience

Posted By Hannah Doty, Tuesday, November 18, 2014
Updated: Monday, November 17, 2014

People often talk about being deeply affected in their adult lives by experiences in their childhood—For example, if you had a bad experience with a dog, you may be afraid of dogs. Or if you had an amazing teacher in third grade, you’ll always remember her and the book she read to you. This same sort of lasting impression is made on kids who are hospitalized for long periods of time. In this respect, the pediatric-patient experience is extremely important since it can affect not only the healing process, but how a person views encounters with health professionals for the rest of his/her adult life.

The hospital is a microcosm—often the only world a child knows if they aren’t able to go home or attend school for long periods of time. A child who is hospitalized will not refer to that time in their life as their "Hospital Experience,” but rather their LIFE experience.

As a childhood cancer survivor, I now find myself reflecting on that time in my life to determine how it has impacted me and shaped me as an adult.

Overall, I believe my experience as a patient was more positive because my parents were actively involved in making sure I could continue to be "me” while in the hospital. I never felt like my identity was "Cancer Patient.”

Part of "me” was drawing and doing art projects. I often shared my artwork with doctors and nurses and involved them in my projects when I could; I asked the nurses and doctors to sign my scrapbooks, take pictures with me, and look at my drawings. I was able to create personal moments with medical staff through my own initiative and these moments helped me to cope much better.

Looking back, I think there were also missed opportunities. If all encounters with medical personnel could have started with a real interest and curiosity about me – Hannah – and not my disease, I wonder how much more positive those daily interactions would have been for all involved. I think I would have been more cooperative in some trying times rather than thinking, "I don’t like this person.” Or even worse: "I’m not going to tell them what hurts.” For children less expressive and/or outgoing than I was, the need for doctors and others to actively pursue genuine non-medical interest seems even more crucial for the best patient experience and outcomes.

Medical professionals who interact with children in the hospital are in many ways substitutes for the other people who are normally in a child’s daily life: teachers, classmates, friends, coaches, etc. As an important person in a child’s life, a doctor/nurse affects how a child views himself. This role is probably not one that a medical professional thinks about – their main job of course is to help a child get well. But when a health professional takes the time to initiate and share a personal moment with a child (discovering a common interest, sharing a joke, drawing together, etc.) there is a tremendous impact not only upon the child’s current health and experience, but upon his/her sense of self and long-term attitudes toward the medical profession.

Because these moments meant so much to me, I strongly encourage medical professionals to consciously create "me moments” with children in the hospital. I believe in doing so, everyone’s experience will be greatly improved and the positive impact will last a lifetime.

Hannah Doty is the founder of V.I.P. Hospital Productions—an organization with a non-profit branch that creates customized entertainment to enhance the experiences of hospitalized kids and promote positive interactions with their medical team.

Tags:  children's medical experience  improving patient experience  patient  patient experience  pediatric  perspective  physician communication 

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