Join | Print Page | Contact Us | Your Cart | Sign In | Register
Guest Blog
Blog Home All Blogs
The Beryl Institute invites members and guests to submit posts on patient experience related topics. For guidelines and information on submitting a post for consideration, contact michelle.garrison@theberylinstitute.org.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: patient experience  healthcare  patient  Leadership  HCAHPS  culture  patient engagement  communication  family engagement  healing  Hospital  physician  caregiver  community  empathy  employee engagement  pediatric  perception  person-centered care  physicians  survey  voice  collaboration  compassion  consumerism  Continuum of Care  Customer Service  experience  family  improving patient experience 

How Much Does Culture Matter in Today’s Healthcare Environment?

Posted By Katie Owens, Monday, April 17, 2017
Updated: Wednesday, April 12, 2017

What is culture? Culture can consist of many different elements in healthcare. From the way things are done in the organization. The shared relationships among people which dictate how they behave. To a set of shared beliefs and values. Each belief (while uniquely described by many) universally acknowledges that culture is an important part of the fabric of their organization.

Despite the fact that many people have conviction that organizational culture will either enable an organization’s success or serve as a barrier to achieving outcomes, sometimes broaching the subject of Culture can cause leaders or front line team members to shy away. Culture can feel messy, hard and inconvenient. We may be proud of some aspects of our culture but disappointed in others. Our team sought to find evidence outside of anecdote and theory to help leaders understand the role culture plays in creating excellence. That query led us to conduct our recent study demonstrated that culture does impact outcomes. The two big learnings we had conducting our study published in the Journal of Healthcare Leadership is that:

First, high performing cultures are more likely to do better than low performing cultures on key balanced scorecard metrics: Employee and Physician Engagement, Patient Experience, Value-Based Purchasing and Turnover. These cultures did not outperform by a small margin but a margin of magnitude and statistical significance (see Video on Culture Imperative). In other words, our team found that culture is not “nice to have” but critical to create demonstrable outcomes.

Second, engaging your employees in your culture is the most powerful step to create positive results. Your workforce is the lifeblood of your organizational culture: their engagement, relationships with leadership and each other and commitment to your mission. We found four key levers that are more likely to support achievement of outcomes:

  • The extent to which patients are treated as valued customers.
  • You find that your values are very similar to the values of this organization.
  • You feel that being a member of this organization is very rewarding.
  • You are proud to be a part of this organization.

There is no question healthcare leaders, staff and physicians are perservering day in and day out to provide the very best care to patients despite a myriad of challenges. Our teams are craving cultures that give them a sense of purpose and joy. As we work to create a “new normal” that equips our organization to provide person-centered excellence across the continuum of care, our findings indicate that leaders should pay attention to culture and actively steer workforce engagement to create employee pride, a focus on the customer and shared values.

Katie Owens, MHA is Vice President of HealthStream Engagement Institute, a HealthStream Company. Katie is a highly regarded thought leader in the healthcare industry who is a national speaker, executive coach and facilitator of leadership. Katie is founder of Lumen, a monthly podcast dedicated to shining a light on the bright spots where excellence happens in healthcare. KatieOwens.org

Tags:  culture  employee engagement  improving patient experience  metrics  physician engagement 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Sacred Ground

Posted By Dr. Bryan K. Williams, Friday, January 22, 2016
Updated: Thursday, January 21, 2016

There are certain places in this world that I truly consider to be sacred. One of those places is a healthcare facility. Whether it is called a hospital, doctor’s office, nursing home, or hospice is irrelevant. In that moment, when someone needs to be cared for and healed, it is a sacred one. One that healthcare providers should never take for granted.

As a patient, I am annoyed that I don’t feel well, and I’m even more annoyed that I have to go visit a healthcare provider. My schedule has been disrupted. I have anxiety about the diagnosis. I might even have more anxiety about how much the medication will cost. The one thing I don’t need, however, is to feel like I am a bother to those I am seeking help from. The healing truly begins way before patients actually meet the provider. It begins with the warm smile from the person at the registration/admissions desk. Or perhaps it begins with whoever answers the phone when the patient calls seeking answers.

Recently, I was facilitating a training session at a healthcare organization. The attendees were comprised of senior and mid-level leaders. Towards the end of the session, one leader asked me, "Under what circumstances should the leader not tolerate negativity from the staff?” At first, I thought the leader meant it as a rhetorical question, but then I realized that she was completely serious. In fact, as I looked around the room, EVERY leader was leaning forward and eagerly awaiting a response. I realized that it was a much more common issue than I previously thought.

After thinking for a moment, I told her that no negativity should be tolerated. Ever. In fact, the healthcare environment is sacred ground, and it should be considered sacred in every way. Especially by those who work there. On the way home, that leader’s question lingered in my mind. Early the next morning, I wrote the following:

Sacred Ground

This is where healing takes place.
This is where caring takes place.
This is where the ultimate expression of hospitality takes place.
Everything I say and do should declare that "I see you...I honor you...and you have unconditional worthiness".
Let there be no gossip.
Let there be no negativity.
Let us only lift each other up, as we lift up those we take care of.
Let us be grateful that there are people who entrust us with their health.
People who need us and depend on us.
May we never take that for granted or grow complacent.
This ground is not sacred because of my degrees, or certifications, or expertise.
It is sacred because "caring" happens here. Healing happens here. Love happens here.
From this day forward, I will consistently put the "care" in healthcare, as I care for my patients, care for my colleagues, and care for myself.
As long as I have breath, I will do everything I can to keep this ground sacred.
-Bryan K. Williams

 


Dr. Bryan K. Williams is a keynote speaker, consultant, and author who champions service excellence and organizational effectiveness. His clients include Baldrige-winning hospitals, award-winning school systems, and Forbes 5-Star Luxury Hotels worldwide. Bryan’s passion is to serve others so they may better serve the world.

Tags:  culture  Leadership  patient advocacy  patient engagement 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

‘Sometimes’ is the Enemy of ALWAYS

Posted By Jake Poore, Friday, July 24, 2015

In Jim Collins’ famous book "Good to Great”, he says ‘good is the enemy of great’. His premise is that we often settle or become comfortable with good or good enough instead of striving for more... reaching for the last inch that drives great experiences.

Great companies not only create experiences that reach more heights (or go the extra mile), they also seem to get everyone in the organization to deliver it, consistently... creating a culture of always.

If good is the enemy of great in business, then ’sometimes’ is the enemy of ALWAYS in healthcare.

  1. If we say, "we’re always going to knock on the patient’s door, wait for their reply, enter, make eye contact, smile, wash hands and introduce ourselves”, and we do this often, sometimes or even most times... we fall short of a culture of always.
  2. Imagine seven nurses care for a patient of over a three-day stay. If five nurses do these behaviors always and two don’t feel this is important and skip it, we’ve created a culture of sometimes – and again, we’ve fallen short on the journey to become a culture of always.

Unintentionally, I believe, we’re creating a silo mentality where everyone does their own thing. That’s a fragmented way to lead any organization. It creates chaos, dissatisfied patients (and employees) and ultimately, low patient satisfaction scores.

For today’s healthcare administrators, this isn’t just something that’s nice to do; it’s a must-do. Federal financial reimbursement is tied to CMS surveys. And these surveys only give credit for "always” answers. If your facility scores a 0 to 8 (never to sometimes), you get zero credit. Clearly, a culture of always means survival.

The popular phrase "culture eats strategy for lunch” rings true. If your culture is weak, how your employees perform their daily job tasks will trump any corporate strategy. You may have good intentions, but they’re only as effective as the integrity of your organization’s culture.

Consider:

  • Some doctors shake hands with patients; some don’t.
  • Some sit and listen to the patient’s story before diagnosing; some interrupt within 18 seconds to "move along.”
  • Some nurses introduce themselves; some don’t.
  • Some offer to close your door for quiet from noise; most don’t.
  • Some food service workers offer to help elderly patients open plasticware and milk cartons; others drop and run.

Besides doctors and nurses, the average patient interacts with more than 100 care team members along their healthcare journey including call center employees, front desk reception, volunteers, transporters, security, food service, housekeepers, etc.

If culture is what we do every day, and we aim to create consistency to survive and thrive in healthcare, then we must create new daily habits as a team so everyone is on the same page. The key is redesigning the culture with input from every employee group.

It seems everyone is admiring this problem, but nobody has a clear solution. The real problem is we’re throwing spaghetti at the wall and hoping it will stick. The solution is to no longer teach to the test as a long-term strategy. To get to a culture of always, we have to change our culture.

Patients are like the canary in the coal mine. They’re sending up warning signals of a flawed culture because, just like the canary, they’re most susceptible in a toxic environment. And make no mistake - they’re calling us out on things that poison the patient experience.

How?
Through patient satisfaction surveys.
By telling friends and family about the level of care they received.
And by taking their business and their loyalties elsewhere.

 *Hear more from Jake Poore about patient loyalty and creating exceptional patient experiences at the upcoming San Francisco Regional Roundtable.

As Founder and President of Integrated Loyalty Systems, a company on a mission to help elevate the human side of healthcare, Jake (@jakepoore) knows what it takes to create and maintain a world-class service organization. He spent nearly two decades at the Walt Disney World Company in Florida helping to recruit, hire, train and align their 65,000 employees toward one end in mind: creating memorable experiences for individuals, not transactions for the masses. In 1996, Jake helped launch the Disney Institute, the external training arm of Disney that sold its business secrets to the world.

Tags:  culture  patient experience  patient loyalty  service excellence  team 

Share |
PermalinkComments (1)
 

The Return on Improvement

Posted By Paul Westbrook, Wednesday, June 24, 2015

In this final article in our three-part series about the three-year patient experience transformation at Inova Health System, we present and examine the results of our efforts. In article one, "A Thin Line, The Nature of Care,” we spoke of adopting a "hospes” approach in healthcare, based on warmth, welcome and hospitality. In "Of Heads, Hearts and Hands,” we illustrated the transition from strategies to action, specifically by inculcating hospitality principles through five key work streams. Today, we must ask: What did we accomplish? What were the measureable results? How did we improve? What was the ROI, the Return… On Improvement?

Since objective and demonstrated numbers are visible evidence of improvement, let’s go there first. At Inova, while we established the foundations for change in the first 18 months of our effort, the latter part of the three-year period started yielding significant improvements across all of the HCAHPS domains. President/COO Mark Stauder reported, "In almost all of the significant areas, scores improved markedly. However there was more than metrics advancing. We were in, and continue to experience, a cultural transformation.” Domains such as, "Overall Rating of the Hospital,” "Nurse Communication,” "Doctor Communication” and "Responsiveness of Staff " scores each rose an average of 42 percentile points. The hospitality principles applied resulted in percentile rank growth from the ~30th percentile to the ~70th percentile in 8 of the 9 HCAHPS domains. Our largest hospital had its most success ever in Q2 of Calendar Year 2015, surpassing goals in 5 domains and being within 2 points of goal in the other three. "By unifying our efforts from the C-Suite to the bedside, we were fulfilling the Inova Promise. We were empowering intentional, genuine and sustainable change,” Stauder noted.

Two of the premises in the Inova approach are 1.) Patient Experience improvement is not a tactic, and 2.) Cultural transformation cannot be delegated. Sustainable performance improvement is a result of systematic inspiration and commitment at all levels of the organization. And it’s not merely about moving the numbers. By focusing on culture, communication, human resources, leadership development and service excellence, enterprise-wide improvement occurred concurrently on all levels as the organization took intentional and measureable steps in delivering the Inova Promise.

Among the learnings in this cultural transformation were the following:

  1. Culture, communication, human resources processes and leadership drive tactics
  2. Defining "Patient Experience” and repeating over and over "what success looks like” provides unifying focus
  3. Cultural transformation cannot be delegated
  4. Data vs. opinion changes behaviors and drives engagement
  5. Human Resource processes empower and sustain service excellence
  6. Leadership’s role is to enable service delivery by removing barriers
  7. Patients need to be part of every step of the process
  8. Clear expectations for improvement must be articulated
  9. Answers lie with those closest to the bedside
  10. Leaders ask great questions, listen intently and invite action

In the realm of patient experience, we speak about "cultural transformation.” Admittedly, it is somewhat nebulous, intrinsically qualitative and difficult to measure. In the same breath, we are also compelled and driven to deliver objectively verifiable and proven scores with the goal of mitigating financial and reputation loss. What a quandary. It is as though we are caught in the middle between the seemingly ambiguous and the fanatically measurable.

In embracing our first premise that 1.) Patient Experience is not a tactic, it seems that asking for a "Return on Investment” may be too narrow of a question, as if the result of our efforts is going to be the sum of multiple tactics. The traditional ROI question seems to head us in an almost transactional tactical approach of a "quid-pro-quod ethic” – do these things to get that result. Perhaps the more appropriate question to ask is rather, "What is the ‘Return on Improvement?’” At Inova Health System, by focusing on hospitality principles across five core work streams, and approaching patient experience as a collective commitment, we experienced transformative- rather than tactical-success.

As we move forward, the Inova Promise is being realized, the spirit of the organization is palpable and the numbers, well they speak for themselves. Three years ago, we returned to hospitality, to a service-discipline of relieving fear, anxiety and suffering. We embraced "hospes,” warmth and welcome – and are realizing each day, a more significant ROI, the transforming "Return on Improvement.”

*This is the final piece of a special three-part guest blog series focusing on various components of patient experience excellence, including patient and family care, culture and leadership and employee engagement. Read Part 1 and Part 2.

Paul is the Vice President of Patient Experience at Inova Health System. Prior to joining Inova, Paul began his service delivery consulting company, Westbrook Consulting, LLC, with the mission of transferring his 35 years of hospitality service in branding, strategic deployment, and operations to other service industries, to give back to his community and make a meaningful difference in peoples’ lives. Paul is also part of The Beryl Institute's Patient Experience Executive Board.

Tags:  culture  improvement  patient experience  return on service 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Of Heads, Hearts and Hands

Posted By Paul Westbrook, Friday, June 12, 2015

In the first article of this series entitled, "A Thin Line, The Nature of Care,” we discussed the inherent challenges discovered in our three-year patient experience transformation at Inova Health System. Our commitment to addressing those challenges, by focusing on hospitality principles was addressed. In the third and final section, we will present, "The Return on Hospitality,” indicating the objective and measurable success we’re achieving. Today, in this second installment, "Of Heads, Hearts and Hands,” the call of moving from the head – to our hearts and hands, from plans and strategies to actions and tactics is examined. As we get started, enjoy this quote:

"A person's most useful asset is not a head full of knowledge, but a heart full of love… and a hand willing to help.” – Anonymous

As we commenced our journey of patient experience transformation at Inova Health System, our first objective was to re-examine strategies and tactics, of uniting heads, hearts and hands in fulfilling the Inova Promise. The initial SWOT analysis revealed sobering realities and opportunities for growth. Through the valuable introspection of the newly formed Patient Experience Transformation Team, it was determined that the most effective channels for change would be to re-inspire five core work streams. This system-wide evolution across core work systems continues today at Inova as we embrace and fulfill our promise:

"We seek every opportunity to meet the unique needs of each person we are privileged to serve – every time, every touch.” Inova Promise

The Five Core Work Streams

  1. Culture.The heart of the matter of service excellence in healthcare is creating a culture that endures across all care areas and locations. With a passionate commitment to our promise, we embody a culture of making emotional connections. Where service is individualized. Where every action is built on intentionality and purpose – in an atmosphere of mutual respect.
  2. Communication.Information is power. Through open communication about mission and vision, staff members are empowered, have a sense of pride and see their roles as critical in the delivery of care. Leaders convey inclusion and respect by sharing insights through multiple channels such as recognition meetings, huddles, executive rounding, newsletters, blogs and other media. Consistent and cohesive communication is foundational to building a culture of shared values.
  3. HR Processes.To be the best, we strive to attract and retain the best. Through a combination of behavioral interviewing and setting the expectation early, we commit to attracting, selecting, orienting, on-boarding, rewarding/recognizing and nurturing the best people we can find, keeping a constant focus on the balance between talent and cultural fit.
  4. Leadership Development. Healthcare leadership requires clinical excellence coupled with interpersonal and administrative acumen. We foster well-rounded excellence in medical competence and leadership that invites and inspires and that is engaging, efficient and effective.
  5. Service Excellence. Our day-to-day engagements include developing champions and driving service essentials like rounding, white board completion and shift-to-shift handoffs. Moreover, we consider one another as internal customers and endeavor to pleasantly surprise each other and our patients with the unexpected anticipation of needs and desires.

The patient experience at Inova Health System embodies a three-stage effort of 1.) Approach 2.) Deployment and 3.) Results. As I’ve discussed the deployment of action through these five core work streams, the next blog post of this three-part series will present the results – results that illustrate a system’s integration of "heads full of knowledge,” and "hearts full of love and hands willing to help.” I will share results that show the impact of a system-wide transformation of service to those "we are privileged to serve – every time, every touch.”

*This is the second piece of a special three-part guest blog series focusing on various components of patient experience excellence, including patient and family care, culture and leadership and employee engagement. Read Part 1 and Part 3 here.

Paul is the Vice President of Patient Experience at Inova Health System. Prior to joining Inova, Paul began his service delivery consulting company, Westbrook Consulting, LLC, with the mission of transferring his 35 years of hospitality service in branding, strategic deployment, and operations to other service industries, to give back to his community and make a meaningful difference in peoples’ lives. Paul is also part of The Beryl Institute's Patient Experience Executive Board.

Tags:  communication  culture  Leadership  patient experience  team 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

A Thin Line - The Nature of Care*

Posted By Paul Westbrook, Thursday, June 4, 2015
Updated: Thursday, June 4, 2015

The etymology of the word hospital indicates that it derives from two rather divergent concepts. The first is the Latin hospes, from which we get warm words like "hospice”, "host” and "hospitable.” The second, also from Latin, is hostis, the root for the rather alarming concepts like "hostile” and "hostage.” As the saying goes, "There’s a thin line between love and hate.” For us in the hospital profession, perhaps we also walk on a thin line.

In my work with a renowned healthcare system in Northern Virginia, I noticed that there are day-to-day elements surrounding us that seem both hospitable (hospes) and hostile (hostis) in the care environment. Hospitable concepts include ideals: emotional connection, welcome, compassion, service, intrinsic joy, extraordinary care, empathy and excellence. Seemingly hostile topics include realities such as: regulatory pressure, profit preoccupation, command and control, task driving, growth planning, provider centrism, compensation concerns, and too many patients and not enough time. Perhaps on any day, we might forgive ourselves when instead of acting as hosts, we catch ourselves treating our patients as hostages. When even small feelings of hostility supersede a spirit of hospice and warmth. Maybe and simply that’s the human nature inherent in the nature of care.

I came to healthcare from 27 years’ executive service with Ritz Carlton and the Marriott Corporation. In the hospitality industry, hospes should always prevail, yet often doesn’t. Again, human nature. Over the past three years, I’ve had the privilege of leading the transformation at Inova Health System in its desire to achieve patient experience excellence. The commitment, collaboration and the results are inspiring, yet have not been without their challenges.

Central in this transformation was our focus in examining 5 key work streams: Culture, Communication, Human Resources Process, Leadership Development and Service Excellence and inculcating these with hospitality principles. As noted, in our introspection, we found both hospitable and hostile elements, both the hospes and hostis.Again, human nature inherent in the nature of care.

Given the power of human nature and our propensities, especially under the many pressures that we face each day both on the business-side and the care-side of healthcare, how do we keep ourselves focused to "deliver the unexpected,” to provide "extraordinary care” and to experience transformation expressed in "service excellence?” At its base, perhaps such service requires a spirit of genuine intentionality, and if I can borrow a word from the hospitality industry, maybe it takes a spirit of "Concierge,” which etymologically means to act "with service.”

Hospitality and hospital share the same linguistic roots. Hospitality principles like making emotional connections, individualizing service, recognizing and celebrating success and striving for service excellence guided us at Inova in our transformation. Integrating these hospes ideals into our work streams helped us gain immediate and sustained patient experience success.

 *This is the first piece of a special three-part guest blog series focusing on various components of patient experience excellence, including patient and family care, culture and leadership and employee engagement.

Paul is the Vice President of Patient Experience at Inova Health System. Prior to joining Inova, Paul began his service delivery consulting company, Westbrook Consulting, LLC, with the mission of transferring his 35 years of hospitality service in branding, strategic deployment, and operations to other service industries, to give back to his community and make a meaningful difference in peoples’ lives. Paul is also part of The Beryl Institute's Patient Experience Executive Board.

Tags:  culture  healthcare  hospital  Leadership  patient experience 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Patient Experience Seen Through the Eyes of Future Healthcare Leaders

Posted By Martie Moore, Friday, May 1, 2015
Updated: Thursday, April 30, 2015

Today, we live in a complex healthcare world. And unfortunately, the excellent patient care always desired, sometimes gets lost in the chaos.

Yet every day, we have the opportunity to calm the chaos and bring to life what Patient Experience Week is truly about: aligning head and heart with compassion.

As Chief Nursing Officer at Medline, it’s my job to uncover new ways to help clinicians meet their patients’ needs. I spend a lot of time in the field talking with clinicians about patient satisfaction and clinical outcomes. For this week, I wanted to do even more. I talked with nursing students, the future of patient care, about aligning head and heart with compassion.

On choosing healthcare:
"I went to college to become a graphic designer. You were always trying to compete with the next person and it just didn’t match my personality, so I started seeking other opportunities. During that time, my grandfather was going through some bouts of cancer. We had good experiences and bad experiences with clinicians. That’s when I knew I wanted to be a nurse and provide patient care.”
Christopher Galloway, MSN candidate at Resurrection University in Chicago

On defining patient experience:
"To me, patient experience is the overall perception a person has about the care they received from a healthcare provider. No matter the diagnosis, if a person feels that they were well-taken care of, they will be satisfied.”
Julie Neske Bierach, Accelerated BSN program at Goldfarb School of Nursing at Barnes-Jewish College in St. Louis

On your first face-to-face interaction with a patient:
"I felt unprepared to handle that level of responsibility, making decisions that directly influence the well-being of another person who has put their faith in the health care system. Often times, patients value the things that you take for granted. My patient may not remember that I ensured her fluid status was adequate every day, but she was sure to thank me upon discharge for making sure she was warm each morning and had enough blankets and pillows. These experiences highlight the balance between the art and science of medicine.”
Jordan Gales, third year medical student at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine

On dealing with life and loss:
"For those that have ever met me, it’s no secret that I’m an emotional person. In nursing, this is almost a paradox—you need innate compassion and emotion to feel for each of your patients and their individual journeys in order to help them, but on the other hand, nurses deal with loss on a daily basis. And they must learn to move on, and not carry each lost patient with them or that can take a huge toll on them emotionally, mentally and physically. When I think about what I need to do to deal with life and loss, I know I’m the kind of person who will put myself in the affected family’s shoes and think about that person that was taken too young, too soon or too unexpectedly. It will weigh heavily on my mind, and more so my heart. Yet, I know I will bounce back, move on and let it go without forgetting the memories of these individuals.”
Lauren Cummings, third-year nursing student at the University of Iowa, College of Nursing

Martie Moore is chief nursing officer of Medline Industries, Inc. based in Mundelein, Ill, a leading provider of medical products and clinical solutions across the continuum of care. In this role, Moore provides nursing leadership for solution-driven clinical programs, delivers product development to enhance bedside practice and launches quality initiatives across the continuum of care. With what she learned during the nearly 30 years of clinical experience and extensive executive leadership, Moore now develops forward-thinking solutions and programs for those in the field today.

Tags:  community  culture  healthcare  interactions  patient experience 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

You Can’t “Policy” People’s Hearts

Posted By Kristin Baird, Tuesday, August 27, 2013
Updated: Friday, August 23, 2013

Staff texting at work? There needs to be a policy. Employees parking in prime patient areas? Make a policy. People walking past trash? Create a policy. The problem is, policies are only as effective as their enforcement and do nothing to engage the heart.

I was recently talking with a group of senior leaders about their current culture. They were clearly frustrated and felt they had come to a standstill. Things were not where they needed to be with regards to both patient satisfaction and employee engagement. They all agreed that accountability was their biggest issue. 

The group talked openly about specific behaviors that were problematic. As I probed into their frustrations, a clear picture began to emerge. Each time one of them would identify a problem, someone would declare the need for a policy. And each time, the rest of the group would agree that a policy was the way to go. I observed this happen five times during the first hour. I was curious to see if the suggestion of a policy was an isolated incident or a pattern. It was clearly a pattern.

Indeed, accountability was a problem, but the leaders’ accepted solution was always to create a policy rather than address the behaviors directly when proved to be misaligned with values or standards.

Let me be clear. There is a place for policies. Without them, we would have havoc. But when striving for a culture of excellence, leaders need more than policies. You can’t "policy” people’s hearts. I, personally, would rather foster a culture where people take ownership and do things because it’s the right thing to do rather than because it’s the policy. 

Transformational leadership is a style that engages people’s hearts and helps them feel part of the cause. To me, this is what is often missing in the quest for service excellence. A lot of time is put into establishing policies and executing tactics from a checklist of best practices, but not enough effort is put into engaging people’s hearts.

Healthcare is a service industry. The work that happens each and every day is perfect for cultivating a link to the heart. People working in healthcare are typically caring individuals with a desire to make a difference. The leader’s role is to harness this passion and help make the connection between the "job” and the individual’s sense of purpose. Tell stories. Review the history of the organization and the vision. Talk regularly about the mission, vision, and values, and help leaders at all levels learn to speak the language of these mission, vision, and values.

When the leader’s focus is on doing the right things for the right reasons, the heart of the organization swells with pride and purpose. It’s not the policies that will resonate with people’s hearts, it’s the passion. Remember that creating and sustaining a culture of excellence takes vision, structure, and, above all, a heart for service.

Kristin BairdKristin Baird is President/CEO of the Baird Group, a healthcare consulting and mystery shopping firm. The Baird Group works to improve healthcare organizations’ patient experiences from start to finish, providing a thorough assessment, qualitative and quantitative data analysis, training, and strategies to help bridge the gap between brand promise and the current reality. For more information on today’s guest blogger, visit baird-group.com

Tags:  accountability  culture  employee engagement  leadership  patient experience  policy  service 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Stay Connected

Sign up for our informative series of monthly e-newsletters from The Beryl Institute.

The Beryl Institute
1560 E. Southlake Blvd, Ste 231
Southlake, Texas 76092
1-866-488-2379
info@theberylinstitute.org