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Sustaining and Embracing Our Physicians and Advanced Practice Clinicians: Conversations We Need to Have

Posted By Jeremy Blanchard, MD, MMM, CPE, FACP, FCCP and FACPE, Wednesday, February 1, 2017
Updated: Wednesday, February 1, 2017

“I was on the inside looking outside. The millions of faces, but still I’m alone… I hope we’ll be here when they’re through with us.”
- Foreigner

When I hear Foreigner sing “Long, Long Way from Home,” I am reminded of conversations I have had with my colleagues, physicians and advanced practice clinicians (APCs). The world of medicine is so dynamic and different from when I started medical school in 1987. Many of these changes are good and have great intent, but many of the ramifications threaten core value attributes of our different generations of healthcare providers: autonomy, sacred relationships with patients, complex problem solving and the joy of practicing medicine. In these conversations the providers relate not having a voice, feeling like healthcare is changing without their input, and not for the better. They feel alone and not valued.

Being a caregiver seldom, if ever, starts from the perspective of practicing medicine as a business opportunity. It starts from a place of the desire to do good. As we enter medical school bright eyed, empathic and energized, what happens to us? Or at least how is our showing of empathy and building relationships threatened or compromised?

This blog is my call for action. A call for us, leaders in healthcare and patient experience, to develop a strategy to address the following question. How can we help our physicians and APCs, seasoned and new, from multiple different generations, feel valued and recapture or sustain their joy of practice? It is paramount, because the provider being empathetic, engaged and joyful is pivotal to our family and friends’ quality of care and how they feel when receiving that care (1, 2).

“I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”
- Maya Angelou
 

The reality of our present American healthcare model in regard to providers is reflected in these powerful statistics.

  • 54% of doctors show signs of burnout and only 40% of doctors are satisfied with their work life balance.(3)
  • For every 1 hour physicians provide direct patient care, nearly 2 additional hours are spent in activities associated with the Electronic Health Record.(4)
  • In one study 52% of medical students suffered from burnout; of those burned out, 35% admitted to unprofessional conduct related to patient care.(5)
  • 14% of Internal Medicine Residents rate life “as bad as it can be” or “somewhat bad.”(6)
  • 38% of Internal Medicine Residents had personal debts greater than $100,000 dollars (2008 monies).(6)
  • 6.3% of participating surgeons had suicidal ideations in the past 12 months.(7)

Physician burnout is real and threatening our whole healthcare system - the quality, safety and compassion of the delivery of healthcare.(8) Burnout is not just among older physicians or surgeons; it is across the whole spectrum of healthcare. In Maslach’s Burnout Inventory Manual, he states, “Burnout is a syndrome of emotional exhaustion, loss of meaning in work, feelings of ineffectiveness and a tendency to view people as objects rather than as human beings.”(9)

When considering this subject there is a complementary way of looking at it that I find valuable. In each of the above statistical bullet points there are multiple challenges accumulating to depersonalize and overwhelm the provider. But what if we were to focus on how we support these courageous and valuable members of the healthcare team? Instead of focusing on burnout, reposition ourselves and focus on developing resilience, investing in our providers to help them find their joy, recapture their personal and cultural value. The following are conversation topics I believe we need to discuss now to answer this call to action. Here are statements to serve as an agenda for generative conversations and next steps to action.

  1. Interventions for burnout need to be as multi-factorial as the causes. The etiologies of burnout for my generation of providers, compared to the millennial provider, may have the same or different root causes. Recognizing the differences in generations allows for more impactful and valuable interventions.
  2. Costs in healthcare live in silos with their relationships unrecognized or declared. A key to making this a prioritized conversation is identifying the price tag to this epidemic. The cost shifts this conversation from the doctor’s and APC’s problem to the CFO’s and CEO’s problem.
  3. We need senior leadership in health care to recognize and quantify the hidden opportunities of investing in our providers. Data shows doctors who have sustained empathy and joy provide safer care and a better patient experience. In population health models this translates to increased revenue.
  4. It is proposed with future physician shortages, APCs will have a greater impact on care delivery, healthcare revenue and patient experience; that “future” is now. We need to create systems that recognize the APC as a unique member of the healthcare team.
  5. With the changes taking place in healthcare we need to assure the new paradigm of excellent care outcomes (the quadruple aim) - enhancing patient experience, improving population health, reducing costs and improving the work life balance of those who provide care.(10)
  6. A happy physician or APC costs the institution much less in legal fees, mistakes, nurse turnover, etc. How do we help our medical culture apply the resources to address major causes of burnout and to support the development of resiliency programs?
  7. Essential to a successful navigation of our healthcare future is identifying communication as an advanced healthcare competency. It deserves the same attention as the mastery of procedural skills, knowledge base and work flow.

The time is now and the “who” is us. If we do not begin to have these conversations and change the perspective of healthcare, our “default” future is one of: not enough healthcare providers, increased healthcare costs and a loss of the “sacred” relationship between the noble men and women who care for patients. This conversation is focused on physicians, but applies to all who touch a patient’s life. Won’t you join me?

Bibliography:

  1. Lucian Leape Institute. Through the Eyes of the Workforce: Creating Joy, Meaning and Safer Health Care. Lucian Leape Institute of the National Patient Safety Foundation 2013.
  2. Beach M, Sugarman J, et al. Do Patients Treated with Dignity Report Higher Satisfaction, Adherence, and Receipt of Preventive Care? Annals of Family Medicine 2005; 3:331-8.
  3. Shanafelt T, Hasan O, et al. Changes in Burnout and Satisfaction with Work-Life Balance in Physicians and the General US Working Population Between 2011 and 2014. Mayo Clinic Proceedings 2015; 90(12):1600-1613.
  4. Sinsky C, et al. Allocation of Physician Time in Ambulatory Practice: A Time and Motion Study in 4 Specialties. Annals of Internal Medicine 2016; 165(11):753-760.
  5. Dyrbye L, Massie F, et al. Relationship Between Burnout and Professional Conduct and Attitudes Among US Medical Students. Journal of the American Medical Association 2010; 304(11):1173-1180.
  6. West C, et al. Quality of Life, Burnout, Educational Debt, and Medical Knowledge Among Internal Medicine Residents. Journal of American Medical Association 2011; 306(9):952-960.
  7. Shanafelt T, Balch C, et al. Suicidal Ideation Among American Surgeons. Archives of Surgery 2011; 146(1):54-62.
  8. Shanafelt T, Balch C, et al. Burnout and Medical Errors Among American Surgeons. Annals of Surgery 2010; 251(6):995-1000.
  9. Maslach C, et al. Maslach Burnout Inventory Manual, 1996.
  10. Bodenheimer T and Sinsky C, From Triple to Quadruple Aim: Care of the Patient Requires Care of the Provider. The Annals of Family Medicine 2014; 12(6):573-576. 

 

Jeremy R. Blanchard, MD, MMM, CPE, is a Chief Medical Officer at Language of Caring. Grounded in healthcare realities and aspiring to partner with others committed to healthcare transformation, Dr. Blanchard is an expert in ensuring physician development, commitment and wholehearted engagement. A dynamic speaker, skilled facilitator and coach, he provides tailored programs for medical staff, coaches individual physicians, and partners with physician leaders to assess needs and implement physician engagement strategies.

Tags:  burnout  clinicians  communication  empathy  language  physician  words 

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