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“I don’t do direct patient care.”

Posted By Ahmanielle Hall, Monday, August 15, 2016
Updated: Monday, August 15, 2016

“I don’t do direct patient care.”

Every time this phrase comes up in conversations I get the tiniest cringe at the emphasis of “do.” As healthcare administrators, we are responsible for sharing the narrative of how great our patient care is and how many services we provide, yet to say one does not “do” direct patient care implies that there is no connection to what takes place on the floors daily.

Of course, not every role in healthcare physically touches the patient, but it is important that all support roles in healthcare organizations understand the impact of their contributions to the patient experience.

Correction: If you work in healthcare in any capacity, you do participate in direct patient care. Maybe it’s the use of the word direct, perhaps that should be eliminated so that there isn’t a scale of responsibility that implies there are two groups in healthcare—those employees in the trenches doing everything they possibly can to provide for the actual care of the patient and others doing everything they can without having what can be perceived as a direct stake in the patient experience.

There appears to be a divide in healthcare into clinical and administrative silos. Two different approaches to healthcare, but both are supposed to have one clear objective: make patients and their families the number one priority. There has to be a way to tie the two functions together to see not only how each group not only takes part in creating the patient experience, but also how both roles need to be symbiotic in creating value for the patient.

Everything we do as healthcare administrators has an impact on care. Whether it’s engaging employees around major strategic initiatives or doing a media story that connects our community to the services we provide, yes—we touch the patient experience. Every piece of collateral, every project, every report in some way has an effect on someone else and their ability to take care of those who trust us with their health.

Clinical teams are able to make this connection easily; however, making the patient experience real for administrative roles in an organization takes more time and effort. It is often said that it takes a special kind of person to be a physician or nurse, but it also takes special people in IT, finance, communications, human resources, parking—all of these areas need special people who see the value in what it is they contribute to healthcare organizations to make patient care effective and meaningful.

Dear healthcare provider, clinical or administrative—you provide direct patient care. You are important and you have a role that connects you in some way to the quality and delivery of patient care. What you do daily has the power to impact or detract from someone else’s experience. We all have a responsibility to provide the best interactions between colleagues, patients and families to create value. Encourage those around you to contribute their very best. Smile, be courteous, help motivate teams to see how providing their best efforts and being strategic about their work can make all the difference in patient care.

Ahmanielle Hall, MSPR serves as a Senior Communications Specialist at Cedars-Sinai. Her experience in public relations, social media marketing and internal communications has provided insight into the importance of building and strengthening relationships not only across healthcare organizations but also in the communities they serve.

Tags:  employee engagement  leadership  patient and family engagement  patient care  quality of care 

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Comments on this post...

Angela Lee says...
Posted Monday, September 19, 2016
This is fantastic! We have a customer service program and a team of Champions that communicate back out to their respective areas. I will sometimes hear certain Champions comment on not being involved in patient care and that the patient isn't their customer - big cringe!
You have stated this perfectly and it will be an item that I can tag on to what I speak on already. Thank you!
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