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Don’t Underestimate the Importance of the Small Things

Posted By Deanna Frings, MS Ed, CPXP, Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Recently I traveled by motorcycle through my home state of Wisconsin enjoying the colors of fall. In planning this trip my husband and I were very intentional in choosing our route, selecting our clothes and determining the day we left.  We knew that paying close attention to these things was very important if we wanted to see the best color possible on the most scenic roads staying warm, dry and safe.

I would categorize these items as having a great impact on the overall quality and safety of our experience.  Many might say, they are the big important things.  In healthcare, there are many big important things in providing high quality, safe care.  And in my experience, we are typically very good at paying attention to these big, important things.

But what was affirmed for me during this trip is that doing things with a clear purpose, being present and intentional can have an equally huge impact on the overall experience even in the most insignificant interactions.  In fact, it is the small things that can often have the greatest positive impact.

When riding on the back of a motor cycle there isn’t much for me to do except to enjoy the scenery. My mind wondered a bit and I started thinking of the importance of being intentional.  Intentional in my work, intentional in my personal life and intentional in my relationships and all that I do.  It’s easy to get lazy and forget the importance and the impact intention can have on oneself and on others. It really does come down to presence, awareness and the power of choice.

At The Beryl Institute, we understand the power of choice and recognize that in every interaction, we have a choice to make. So, for the remainder of the trip it was my goal to create positive moments by being very intentional in the interactions I had. The criteria I used to measure my success included receiving a comment of appreciation such as a “Thank you”, noting a smile as a result of the interaction and/or walking away with an overall positive and warm feeling.

We came upon road construction several times throughout the week. On many of these occasions, the road merged into a single lane which required members of the construction crew to flag vehicles through from each direction ensuring our safety. At more than one of these locations, we were the first vehicle stopped by a person holding a stop sign waiting patiently for our turn to pass through.

I have always wondered what it must be like to be one of these individuals standing in the elements for several hours a day holding a ten foot stop sign. There have been a few occasions when I would nod slightly but on this occasion, I wanted to acknowledge the person and to let them know how much I appreciated the job they did to ensure our safety. On a motorcycle, it was very easy to have this conversation. I could see a smile come across the gentleman’s face and he nodded. As we passed through, he waved and said, “Have a great and safe ride.” This small but purposeful gesture, created a moment that enhanced this part of our journey.

Test number two came when we stopped for lunch. On a motorcycle trip of this length, stopping for lunch is a highlight of the day. Its time off the bike and that is always welcomed. It’s fun to stop at simple cafes and dinners and this particular stop was extremely enjoyable.  Not so much because of the food but rather our waitress who was extremely personable and good at what she did. I have always enjoyed watching people do what they do every day especially when you can tell they enjoy their work. 

She had purpose, presence and did everything with intention. It was fun watching her work the room. She acknowledged us the minute we sat down and indicated she would be with us in a just a moment. As promised, she came over immediately after delivering hot food to another table, introduced herself and seeing the clothing we were wearing and our helmets asked, “are you staying warm out there today?” She was helpful with the menu, anticipated all of our needs and provided us with a lovely 45-minute break off the bike.

As she was cleaning the dirty dishes from the table and leaving us the check, I asked her how long she had worked here and told her how much I enjoyed watching her as it appears she really enjoys her work. She was beaming at this acknowledgment and went on to share that it brings great joy to her when she can offer great service to her customers and thanked us for coming in today.

The final experiment came during a service recovery opportunity after being on the bike for a long 6-hour day. Upon entering the parking lot of our hotel, we were required to take a parking ticket from an automated machine that would subsequently open the gate. As we started moving through the gate, it immediately lowered itself onto the motorcycle prior to us passing completely through. It took all my husband’s strength to stop the gate from lowering all the way onto the bike and for those brief 20 seconds until I hit the button for another ticket, it was a bit terrifying. Not the most comforting way to end the day. 

We were greeted by a very nice young man at the registration desk. He noticed we were a bit distressed and inquired how he could help. After hearing our explanation about the gate prematurely closing, he did all the right things you would hope an employee would do at a time when service recovery is warranted.  He acknowledged our concern, apologized it happened and immediately went to work to make amends. As he completed the registration process, he once again apologized for this situation. We thanked him for his help.

Later in the evening when we came down to dinner, I wanted to once again acknowledge how much what he did meant to us. I proceeded to the desk to explain to him what I did at The Beryl Institute and how much we talk about the importance of service recovery.  The term was new to him but he really appreciated that I took the time to share this information and to thank him once again.  As I walked away, I turned back and he was fast at work welcoming another couple to the hotel with a great smile on his face.

Sometimes we never know the impact a small gesture might have.

Four years ago, I met a gentleman by the name of Andreas. At that time, he was a student at DePaul University. Jason Wolf was participating in a patient experience panel discussion for the class. Following the class, we joined the students for a light meal and further networking. Andreas was sharing how much he was learning about patient experience and his desire to ultimately find a job in the field but was concerned about his lack of work experience. During our conversation, I was very impressed with this young man. He had a clear vision, defined purpose and he was building an intentional plan to achieve his goal. And from where I was sitting, he had a true passion about patient experience. It was this that I wanted to reflect back to him. I simply put my hand on his shoulder and said, “Andreas, you are the Patient Experience;” I took one of our IMPX pins and secured it to his jacket.  He simply smiled and said, “Thank you”. 

Four years later, Andreas along with his colleagues presented at the Patient Experience Conference. Andreas came up to me during the conference and recounted that evening four years earlier and shared with me how much it meant to him. It gave him continued confidence to work toward his goal of working in the field of experience. I also noticed he was wearing his IMPX pin.

It was hard to hold back my tears. To think of the impact that small gesture had and the vivid memory it still holds was humbling. But you see, we all know because of our own experiences the positive and lasting impact these small gestures can have. Leading with purpose, being present and doing things with intention can positively impact both the big and small things in our everyday interactions.

In conclusion, I encourage you to think about these simple examples and the lasting impact they had on these individuals as well as the positive impact they had on me. There is an important conversation going on in the patient experience community about employee engagement. At the heart of our humanness, it is being in relationship with each other that keeps us engaged in caring for those we serve. And it’s all big and important stuff.

 

Deanna Frings, MS Ed, CPXP
Vice President, Learning and Professional Development
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  caring  employee engagement  impact  interactions  journey  patient experience community  power of choice 

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A Patient’s Wish List: Executing a Better Patient Experience

Posted By Tiffany Christensen, Wednesday, October 11, 2017

As the newest member of The Beryl Institute Team, I want to begin by stating how honored I feel to be brought in as the Vice President of Experience Innovation. I started my new role on October 1, 2017 and the timing could not have been better because my first day on the job meant a trip to Southlake, TX for a quarterly in-person staff meeting.

Since I have been a long-time friend and board member of the Institute, it was not a shock to me when I learned that Jason Wolf, President, had assigned the team a book to read for our upcoming (my first) staff strategy meeting. I’ll call it “Jason’s Book Club.” The title of the book was Execution: The Art of Getting Things Done.

I’ll be honest and say that the first few pages worried me because I immediately noticed this was primarily a book about business theory. I have my strengths and having a mind for business is not one I would put at the top of the list.

Turns out, I was familiar with this “world” after all because I have experienced a lot of the dynamics the book explores while working in a hospital and working as a consultant.

According to Execution, the first “building block” of running a successful business requires leaders to cultivate “emotional fortitude.” The authors go so far as to state that “leaders in contemporary organizations may be able to get away with emotional weakness for a brief time” but “emotional weakness will destroy both the leader and the organization.” In reading this, I certainly thought of the leaders we have running hospitals and regulatory bodies but it’s so much more than that. When the book outlined what it takes to achieve emotional fortitude, I felt like I might have been reading my patient wish list:

  • Authenticity
  • Self-Awareness
  • Self-Mastery
  • Humility

It’s obvious to everyone that patients and families react differently to illness or injury. Part of what makes working in healthcare so challenging is the simple fact that what makes one person feel safe and cared for may feel like an intrusion or a lack of caring to the person in the room down the hall. With that said, there are some universalities to the patient experience that lend themselves to a core set of needs.

Authenticity. Being a patient usually brings with it some level of emotional “rawness.” Simply put, getting in touch with one’s vulnerability and mortality often brings with it a sense of urgency to cut through some of our society’s typical superficial layers and get to the heart of things. Whether this is the heart of the diagnosis or the heart of what brings life meaning, patients and families crave authenticity from loved ones and the professionals caring for them. For example, as we work to find our True North in creating a better experience, sometimes professionals bring an overly cheery attitude into the room. While this has the best of intentions, it can often rub patients and families the wrong way because it feels incongruous to the patient’s current state. When professionals are not able to acknowledge the tone of the patient or family, they are not able to meet this need for authenticity and the ability to effectively communicate may be impacted.

Self-Awareness. Just as every patient in a healthcare setting is human, so too are the professionals caring for patients. Despite what we seem to be asking of our healthcare professionals in today’s climate, no one person can be all things to all people. Those who know their own strengths and weakness have the opportunity to consciously craft the best possible approach to working with patients and families. As one works on their weaknesses, they can also call upon their team members to support patients and families in ways that may not come as easily to them. Some people explain clinical information very well while others do a better job sitting with those who are grieving a loss or new diagnosis. It is essential that healthcare professionals not expect themselves to be perfect or responsible for meeting every need of every patient/family member. However, by practicing self-awareness, teams can be honest with each other about who is best to serve in what capacity to meet the needs of those they serve. It goes without saying that this level of self-awareness combined with the willingness to strategize around it, requires all of the other characteristics explored here.

Self-Mastery. Being a patient can also bring with it a level of fear or frustration that makes a person behave outside of themselves. To say it more plainly, patients are often at their worst and this can be reflected in behavior that can be read as rude, erratic or impatient. Without Self-Mastery, it is easy to match a patient’s tone of negativity and even take their behavior personally. When healthcare professionals don’t practice self-mastery and they become emotionally effected by a patient’s poor behavior, they may visit the patient less, fail to engage them in co-designing the treatment plan and speak to them in a way that has unpleasant undertones. Self-Mastery is certainly the tallest of the orders in this list. A lack of it also holds the greatest potential for the team to break down and for everyone to feel disrespected. As it relates to satisfaction for patients, families and providers, this is arguably the most important ingredient.

Humility. Humility is a quality that likely does not need much of an illustration. A person who is not humble is often perceived as a person who is not keen on considering the opinions and perspectives of others. In the larger picture, humility is key to patient safety. If a provider cannot humble themselves to take concerns, corrections or stories seriously, they may miss crucial information and possibly make a mistake in the diagnosis or treatment of their patient. As a patient, the possibility of not being heard can evoke fear and frustration. I believe this is because, on a conscious or unconscious level, patients and families know instinctively that a lack of humility is a safety issue.  

If your heart is heavy thinking about being both clinically excellent AND dedicated to personal growth, please don’t despair. This list is not just for healthcare professionals. As we continue to explore what it means for a patients and families to be authentic members of the healthcare team, we should also turn this list around to be a set of goals for patients and families.

Imagine the team dynamic if patients, families and providers all were working at authenticity, self-awareness, self-mastery and humility. This team would be filled with honesty, vulnerability and a clear focus in collaboration and co-designing care. Perhaps these are those intangible elements of patient and family engagement that are hard to measure but quite obvious when absent. Perhaps we could use these characteristics as the anchors to a vision for the ideal in healthcare teamwork. And, just think, all of these components of emotional fortitude came from business people! Sincerely, I am grateful for Jason’s Book Club pick, Execution, allowing us to take a look at healthcare leadership and teamwork through a different lens; the lens of a Patient’s Wish List.


Tiffany Christensen
Vice President, Experience Innovation
The Beryl Institute

 

Source:
Bossidy, L., Charan, R., & Burck, C. (2002). Execution: The discipline of getting things done. New York: Crown Business.

Tags:  authencity  book  business  execution  humility  patient  patient advocate  patient and family engagement  reading  self-awareness  self-mastery 

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Announcing PX Connect: A New Member-Powered Virtual Patient Experience Community is Coming

Posted By Denise R. Weathers, Wednesday, September 20, 2017

The idea of community aligns strongly with the definition of patient experience that asserts patient experience across the entire continuum of care. This means to provide a true experience, you must think well beyond the physical nature of your facilities or practices to recognize the experience resides in the network of people that surround and are connected to your organization, both near and far. This is at its heart, the essence of experience. The experience you provide is a community story and one you must be willing to acknowledge, address and oftentimes, share.

The essence of patient experience thrives in much bigger ideas of community, which is why we have worked effortlessly in creating a true community of practice in The Beryl Institute itself. We recognize, through observation of the listserv discussions and feedback from member surveys, our members are seeking the option to engage with peers in a more personalized manner according to specific special interests, as well as an enhanced organized, streamlined way to discover, share and connect. As the Institute continues to grow and evolve, so does the communication and engagement needs of its patient experience member community. 

We listened and PX Connect, the Institute’s newest enhanced virtual patient experience community benefit, is coming soon, replacing the current PX Listservs.  Exclusively for members, this powerful virtual community will enhance the ways you engage, share and learn with the Institute’s patient experience community around the world. It has been designed with a simple focus: to share special-interest knowledge and resources through connection with your peers and other healthcare organizations focused on patient experience efforts to foster the creation of strong national and global networks.

The PX Connect community, will allow members to:

  • Easily search for content, viewing calendars of events and deadlines.
  • Share challenges and best practices in real-time.
  • Get direct access to current information and timely news. Search and contribute to the powerful Library of patient experience resource models and samples designed to generate ideas and save your peers and you time from reinventing the wheel.
  • Stay connected with participating Patient Experience Conference attendees and Learning and Professional Development course classmates.
  • Engage with committee members real-time.
  • View community content on any screen size or mobile device.
  • Receive special recognition for contributions to the PX Connect Community.
  • Create an instant infrastructure for patient experience communication across systems enabling their staff, key stakeholders, patients and family members to virtually engage, network and share knowledge through a private online community platform (Exclusive to Organizational Members).
  • And more!

The PX Connect community will support your patient experience resource solution needs—and to celebrate and share in your patient experience victories. The community will also provide you with a virtual high-five and a shared laugh.

Thank you for your continued support of the Institute. Membership with the Institute shows that your organization is committed to creating market distinction by supporting a culture where staff at all levels have access to patient experience resources, show their understanding that patient experience is an integration of quality, safety and service and display a commitment to provide the best in outcomes for those in our care.

If you have any questions about your membership, or wish to have your organization join our patient experience community, please feel free to contact me at denise.weathers@theberylinstitute.org.

 

Denise R. Weathers
Vice President, Membership
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  community  connection  member benefit  member value  membership  networking  px connect 

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At the Heart of Patient Experience is Caring for Those Who Care: A Call to Action for Those in Need

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, PhD, CPXP, Thursday, September 7, 2017

For the last two weeks, I have had the opportunity to visit two amazing healthcare institutions in São Paulo, Brazil – Hospital Sírio Libanêse and Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein – and meet healthcare leaders from across Latin America committed to improving patient experience. While there I had the unique experience of watching the approach of and resulting impact of Hurricane Harvey on Texas and Louisiana from outside the United States. As was evident in every report, the challenge this storm posed for the communities it impacted, their infrastructure and their healthcare organizations placed a significant strain on the system and created great need.

As we have seen in patient experience efforts around the globe, a central priority has emerged, one focused on taking care of not just those we serve in healthcare, but the people serving as well. This idea of caring for our team and staff in healthcare, of ensuring the engagement and care of our employees, was in fact the fastest growing point of focus in supporting patient experience success in The State of Patient Experience 2017. It is clear that taking care of those who give of themselves in healthcare is something we cannot and should not take lightly. This is no more relevant than at this moment in cities such as Houston, TX in the aftermath of Harvey (and now for those in the path of Hurricane Irma).

For all that healthcare organizations have done to support the needs of their communities impacted by Harvey, they too have been literally underwater. With many instances of organizations with disrupted and/or discontinued services, these organizations have stretched their capacity to care for the communities they serve. Yet, what we must realize is that those providing care are not only caregivers, they are the affected themselves. They too may be displaced by flooding or damage, their families impacted and their lives disrupted, yet they have remained steadfast in their efforts to care for those in need.

It is in times like this where the need to care for those who provide care is impossible to miss. It also reinforces that we cannot and should not overlook this need any day in which we are looking to provide the best in care for our communities, for the best in care starts with taking care of our own people. And this critical time calls on not just the organizations impacted to step up, but truly all of us with the means and/or desire to help to do the same.

Our colleagues at ACHE last week called for the support of an effort at the Texas Hospital Association, which has established the THA Hospital Employee Assistance Fund to help hospital employees who experienced significant property loss or damage due to Hurricane Harvey. There are also still significant needs for all those impacted by this event that can be supported via the American Red Cross and numerous other charitable opportunities.

These needs and the opportunities to help are now being elevated by the latest storm, Irma. With her eye already impacting many and set at one of the busiest hubs of healthcare activity in the United States, the need to care for one another and our call to take care of others is only further reinforced. This is not a time to sit idly by, but rather recognize that whether in the path of a literal storm or in the dynamic and chaotic environment that healthcare globally presents, we must never overlook the opportunity to care for those who care.

In the industry of caring for others that healthcare represents and the profession of patient experience that is emerging at its core, we must not forget that our primary means of delivering on our purpose, promise and commitments is through the very people who give of themselves every day to care for others. It is in times like this that we all must step up to care for and support them.

I invite you to join us in this effort, to support the affected members of our community and all those in need. For in healthcare, where we are human beings caring for human beings, and with an unwavering commitment to the human experience in healthcare (and beyond), we are called to act and help those in our communities who need us. There may be no greater purpose in our work, and no greater effort in ensuring we maintain the best in experience for all we care for and serve. Thank you for joining us in this effort as our deepest thoughts and warmest wishes go to all impacted by Harvey and those preparing for the arrival of Irma.

The following links will allow you to learn more about and contribute to the following causes and I invite you to share other means of support for these efforts via the comments section below:

THA Hospital Employee Assistance Fund

 American Red Cross

 

Jason A. Wolf, PhD, CPXP 
President 
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  community  compassion  compassionate care  employee engagement  houston  hurricane harvey  hurricane relief 

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A New View: An Unwavering Commitment to the Human Experience in Healthcare

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Thursday, August 3, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, August 1, 2017

This month’s Patient Experience blog is an excerpt from the recently released research report, The State of Patient Experience 2017: A Return to Purpose.

We have always maintained that in patient experience there are no major secrets and with that believe strongly that the differentiator is not in the private processes you create or the proprietary models an organization might produce. Rather it is in the spirit of an open sharing of ideas through which all should play and in the distinction of a true commitment to execution through which you should compete. Experience will be and is already emerging as a key, if not the primary, differentiator in healthcare. The opportunity in front of each organization is how they will seize this moment.

For us at the Institute, part of this moment is to acknowledge that patient experience will forever be central to healthcare, but also as we learn from the community and from the very data in this year’s benchmarking study the healthcare experience we are speaking to reaches beyond patient experience itself. In an environment where we clearly base all work on human beings caring for human beings we are ultimately addressing and impacting the human experience in our midst. For this reason, we believe at The Beryl Institute as we remain committed to patient experience we must address the reality of the human experience that is central to healthcare overall.

With this, we have set a bold and fundamental desired impact for how we look to move into the years ahead. Our intended focus is simple, clear and true:

Changing healthcare by advancing an unwavering commitment to the human experience.

In doing this we honor the work each of you are doing and the reality of the healthcare world we find ourselves collectively creating around the globe. In a commitment to shift how healthcare works, we must dedicate ourselves to the broader human experience, honoring both the patient experience at its core and the experience of all driving and supporting healthcare’s efforts every day. With that we believe this commitment must be grounded on four key points:

  • Understanding experience is defined as the sum of all interactions shaped by an organization’s culture, that influence patient perceptions across the continuum of care.
  • Acknowledging experience (1) encompasses the critical elements of healthcare from quality, safety and service, to cost and population health issues that drive decisions, impact access and ensure equity and (2) reaches beyond the clinical encounter to all interactions one has with the healthcare system.
  • Recognizing that human experience reinforces the fundamental principle of partnership and is therefore inclusive of the experiences of those receiving and delivering care as well as all who support them.
  • Reinforcing that focused action on experience drives positive clinical outcomes, strong financial results, clear consumer loyalty, solid community reputation and broad staff and patient/family engagement.

This commitment has been spurred by all we have seen in this work and by all each member of the broader patient experience community has taught us. As we travel a journey to reinforce the critical role of the human experience in healthcare all that we learned in this year’s study takes on even greater relevance.

We must strive for what we believe is important collectively and then ensure we find ways in each and every one of our organizations to apply these principles, practices, ideas and findings for the good of all engaged. This is not idealism, but rather a practical reflection on where we are and what we can achieve. The state of patient experience is about much more than what we have or will do, to what we are and what we can become. That is the inspiration we glean from those that contributed their voices in this year’s study and the motivation we garner from working collectively as a community dedicated to the human experience in healthcare.

The state of patient experience is strong, your efforts and commitment are true and the possibilities of all we can accomplish as a result are yet to be realized. That makes this perhaps one of the most exciting times to be committed to this work. We look forward to traveling the next steps of this journey with each of you.

> Download the full State of Patient Experience 2017 research report


Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., CPXP

President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  community of practice  culture  global healthcare  healthcare  Human Experience  Patient Experience 

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We the People: Why Patient Experience Must Be the Foundation of Healthcare Policy

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Thursday, July 6, 2017
Updated: Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Two things have become central to all I see, say and share in engaging in discussions on the patient experience globally: one, that ALL voices matter, and two, that in healthcare we are human beings caring for human beings. These ideas while simple in concept also provide for all that is complex in healthcare. They have implications in both the delivery of care and in the design of the policies and systems that support the delivery of care.

As we think about the delivery of care, the provision of care at a personal level, the idea of experience – of quality, safe and service focused encounters grounded in dignity and respect and driven by communication, partnership and knowledge – is a natural fit. As citizens of our planet, as people who choose our points of focus from ideals, beliefs and/or faith, we have been taught and encouraged to treat others as we hope to be treated and to act with compassion as we engage in caring for others.

Yet, as we get to the level of policy and the systems that both support and yes, constrain, our capacity to create environments of caring, we have a much greater opportunity. In instilling the ideas of all voices, not only do we add perspective, but we by default introduce potentially perpendicular ideas. As we author policy and adapt structures that circumscribe the humanity at the heart of healthcare, we create both clearer pathways and opportunities for obstacles. It is in the midst of this noise that we must find and mold the material needed to positively frame the human experience in healthcare.

It is pertinent to explore this idea during a week where we saw both Canada Day in Canada and Independence Day in the United States. As we explore the roots of these two great democracies, or of any democratic society around the world, there may be no more important concept than the first three words found in the United States Constitution – We the People. Democracies by their very nature favor equal rights, freedom of speech and support the ability to raise conflicting perspectives. Therefore democracy, the idea of citizenship, of partnership, of equality, underlines the idea at the core of patient experience that all voices matter. Yet often, for people of all political beliefs and perspectives, for those who engage in healthcare from the aging, to those with chronic disease, family caregivers, to concerned parents and even for those who have yet to have a serious medical encounter, it feels as if the “system” and the policies that dictate its actions have forgotten them.

This idea that We the People have a voice that matters in healthcare is more relevant now than in any other time, not just in this period of policy change in the United States, but in how people view healthcare globally. This understanding of the criticality of the moment spurred a call to action by a group of committed leaders who have been listening to patients and peers, leaders and policy makers and recognized a great opportunity existed. If efforts were going to be more than just claiming to be “patient centric” and instead actually worked to engage the voices that are impacted by policy itself, then voices had to be raised, issues identified and actions taken.

This belief led to the initial idea of what has emerged as the Patient Experience Policy Forum (PXPF). The PXPF originated in 2016 through a series of conversations among a group of patient experience leaders and patient and family advocates who recognized the growing imperative to influence and help shape policy at the national and state levels on issues that directly affect the patient and family experience. The group and a growing number of individuals who have fostered its initial growth believed it was time to move the conversation on experience excellence beyond practice to address the policies and systems that were impediments to and encourage and support those that were supportive of the very principles all strive for in delivering care.

PXPF has quickly moved from concept to reality in establishing itself as a broad-based coalition of organizations and individuals engaged in advocacy and action to give a greater voice in healthcare policy to those working to improve the patient and family experience. It just announced last week that it will hold its inaugural meeting this September 19, 2017 in Washington, DC. PXPF will be working to advocate for policies and systems that will:

  • Advance Patient and Family Partnership
  • Elevate the Value Case
  • Improve Patient-Centered Measurement and Reporting
  • Strengthen Systems for Patient Involvement
  • Expand Professional Education and Support
  • Reduce Disparities

I invite you to explore the inaugural event of PXPF, share this opportunity with your peers and consider ways in which you can engage either in person or in an ongoing nature.

There is a reality in healthcare that we cannot overlook. That for as much as the conversation today, especially in the United States, is about the issues and challenges of insurance companies and/or constraints placed on provider organizations, those impacted by policy, especially those experiencing healthcare itself must not be left from this conversation. There are many organizations today doing great work advocating for specific diseases or segments of the population, but what is deemed missing is the idea that at the heart of all we do in healthcare, we must return to the human experience. If we believe fundamentally that caring for our fellow citizens, and in particular their health, matters, if we believe that ‘We the People’ matters, then we cannot waver in ensuring that patient experience must be the foundation of healthcare policy. I hope you will join us in this endeavor.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., CPXP
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  equity  experience era  healthcare  healthcare policy  improving patient experience  Patient Experience  patient experience policy forum  PXPF 

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There’s No Place like Home…The Value of Connecting with Your Patient Experience Community

Posted By Stacy Palmer, Tuesday, June 13, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, June 13, 2017

I recently chatted with one of our members after she returned from another healthcare conference. While she enjoyed the event, she shared that the experience itself felt dramatically different than her time at our March Patient Experience Conference in Denver. I asked a few questions to try to understand what the difference was. The breakout sessions were great, the keynote speakers were inspiring, and it was a large crowd of other leaders in similar types of roles. Yet, she still felt something was lacking. Upon further reflection, she realized the missing element was the sense of community and emotional connection she experiences every year at The Beryl Institute conference.

Her comments reinforced feedback received after this year’s Patient Experience Conference. Participants said things such as, “Everyone was so kind and helpful…it was easy to meet people…it was so wonderful to be surrounded by like-minded people…we're all in this together!” These statements reflect things we hear often at the Institute, an appreciation for the welcoming and engaging community that has developed through a shared passion for building and sustaining the patient experience movement. 

Our community connects in many ways throughout the year – chatter on social media, regular discussions on listservs, and conversations through Topic Calls and Patient Advocacy Connection Calls. In recent months, we’ve also enjoyed watching dialogue between members explode in the chat box of our regular webinars where participants share where they’re logging in from, reconnect with old friends and tap into the tremendous wealth of knowledge that is represented in this patient experience community.

The virtual connections are powerful and a hallmark of The Beryl Institute. While these opportunities are invaluable, I would argue there is no replacement for spending time together in person. As the patient experience movement has grown, we’ve witnessed incredible connections between the leaders doing this work and an amazing energy and enthusiasm that comes when we gather together to share ideas, connect and learn. Our community believes patient experience is a foundational element of the overall healthcare experience, and there is something about getting together in person that inspires us to live and share that message.

At The Beryl Institute we continue to foster opportunities for face-to-face connections. Last week we announced the opening of the Call for Submissions for breakout sessions at Patient Experience Conference 2018 to be held April 16-18 in Chicago. We hope you will join us there and even consider submitting a proposal to share your patient experience successes.
 
But even before then we have many opportunities for you to engage face-to-face with patient experience peers. This fall we’ll hold Patient Experience Regional Roundtables in Canada, California, Louisiana and New York. Regional Roundtables are one-day programs bringing together the voices of healthcare leaders, staff, physicians, patients and families to convene, engage and expand the dialogue on improving patient experience. Through inspiring keynote sessions and working group discussion, participants leave with an expanded network, renewed energy and actionable ideas to support patient experience efforts in their own organizations.

We also have two upcoming Certified Patient Experience Professional (CPXP) preparation workshops. These are opportunities to gather with other patient experience leaders to not only network and share, but to prepare together for the CPXP exam. Community members will gather later this month in Chicago and in September in Los Angeles for full day courses reviewing the domains outlined in the job classification on which the CPXP examination is based. 

The Beryl Institute continues to be the global community of practice dedicated to improving the patient experience through collaboration and shared knowledge. We are a welcoming and engaging community. I am often reminded of an early Patient Experience Conference where a participant stood up and joyfully proclaimed “I have found my professional home!”  As a leader in the movement, we hope you view the Institute as your professional home, and we invite you to further connect with your patient experience family. 


Stacy Palmer, CPXP
Senior Vice President
The Beryl Institute 

Tags:  community of practice  Field of Patient Experience  healthcare  improving patient experience  leadership  networking  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  thought leadership 

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Patient Experience: A Global Conversation

Posted By Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., Thursday, May 4, 2017
Updated: Thursday, May 4, 2017

I am writing this blog as we wrap up the 2017 Patient Experience Symposium in Sydney. The event, a collaboration among healthcare and consumer organizations in Australia committed to engaging in and expanding the conversation on patient experience, comes on the heels of an incredible Patent Experience Week where we saw organizations from around the globe celebrating those committed to excellence in patient experience. In that same period, we had the release of the latest issue of Patient Experience Journal (PXJ) that brought together perspectives from around the world and is now read in over 190 countries and territories.

As I reflect on just these last few days, they represent a significant statement about where the patient experience movement is going. They also offer us some perspective on the opportunity we have before us and the efforts we must consider in moving to action overall. The experience movement that bloomed in the last decade and that some called a fad that would soon pass or an idea that would be obscured by shifting policy focus or diluted by competing priorities, instead has found itself expanding with purpose.

As Jane Cummings, CNO England wrote in her commentary in the latest PXJ, “the global dialogue on patient experience will become even more important, as we recognise that despite differences in design and operation, the challenges our health systems face and the focus on what matters most to patients are shared.” This recognition that we are moving to a macro effort, acknowledging the reality of our own individual systemic constraints not as impediments, but perhaps learning points to be leveraged is where opportunity calls us. In looking across systems boundaries and peeling back policy layers, we reveal fundamentals that rest solidly at the heart of the experience conversation. These ideas were reinforced in the latest State of Patient Experience data just released during Patient Experience Conference 2017.

  1. Experience must remain an integrated focus on quality, safety, service and more. To provide the best in experience and effect positive change, we can no longer force boundaries between these efforts in the face that they are all part of what patients, families and consumers encounter.
  2. The fastest growing area of focus for organizations in addressing experience is employee engagement. This rapid rise in both recognition of and focus on staff needs in the healthcare ecosystem is fundamental and significant. The idea that we must take care of ourselves to take care of others, is not just motherly advice, but sound strategic thinking in a business where we are human beings caring for human beings.
  3. In finding employee engagement at the heart of all we do, it is forever intertwined with the engagement of patients and family members as partners in this work, not only in their own care plans, but in the very work we must do to redesign our systems of care, co-design new processes and better understand the needs of those we serve. My visit this last two weeks in Australia and the opportunity to engage with both the consumer councils in New South Wales and Western Australia reinforced the critical point that patients, family and community members are partners in and consumers of care. This idea spans our globe and must be central to any actions we take.

In all that I had the chance to see and learn during my last 10 days in Australia, what was shared over PX Week and is part of the ongoing patient experience conversation, not only are these core ideas central across time zones, there are core practices that follow as well. These include ideas such as the intentional collection of actionable data – both through formal survey methods and now more so in real time to address critical issues and build cases for change, interdisciplinary rounds and bedside shift reports and handoffs, creating formal structures and processes for engaging patients and families on councils, boards and committees and expanding how staff and employees can provide feedback and contribute to improvements.

In finding core ideas and common ground, we must also acknowledge the work of patient experience is not easy work. It is not something we master simply by creating checklists or wrangle with protocols. It is something that requires strategic commitment, an openness to collaboration and sharing and perhaps most of all an acknowledgement that we are all in this effort together. There is a global conversation taking place on patient experience, one focused on creating the best healthcare systems driving the best results on all corners of our globe.

We must now be willing to share wildly and steal willingly in order to learn from one another and improve. That is our greatest and most critical opportunity and one we should not take lightly. We are in a unique and opportune moment in healthcare, for as an industry in serving those in front of us, we can and will bring this world closer. It is a conversation I am honored to be a part of and one I, and I hope each of you, will strive every day to champion.

 

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D., CPXP
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  collaboration  community of practice  employee engagement  global  partnership  patient and family engagement  patient experience week  state of patient experience 

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Strengthening the Field of Patient Experience: The Journey to Certified Patient Experience Professional (CPXP) Preparation

Posted By Deanna LW Frings, Friday, April 7, 2017
Updated: Sunday, April 9, 2017

Reinforcing The Beryl Institute’s commitment to framing and expanding the field of patient experience, we held the first CPXP preparation workshop last month in conjunction with Patient Experience Conference. The foundation for this preparation course began years earlier with the development of the Patient Experience (PX) Body of Knowledge, one of the most significant illustrations of our community of practice model at work.

The PX Body of Knowledge is a community-developed framework capturing the knowledge central to the role of all healthcare leaders supporting patient experience. Over 400 individuals from 10 countries contributed to its development resulting in a broadly accepted set of 15 domains and associated skills. This work reinforces the concepts central to patient experience and provides a clear foundation of knowledge that supports the development of current and future leaders.

A guiding principle of this work is that the outcomes are grounded in the voice of the field and fundamental to any leadership role in today’s healthcare environment. It represents an important step in The Beryl Institute’s commitment to support leaders and organizations in today’s healthcare environment.

Using the Body of Knowledge framework as a guide, 15 courses were developed and made available in the summer of 2015. To date, over 400 individuals have engaged in completing the courses and over 200 people have achieved a certificate in Patient Experience Leadership or Patient Advocacy.

In recognizing the need to not only provide knowledge, but also create a foundation to certify professionals in the field, Patient Experience Institute (PXI), our sister organization, developed a psychometrically developed and validated examination process to become a Certified Patient Experience Professional (CPXP).  In December 2015, PXI launched the first inaugural CPXP examination and as of December 2016, 290 individuals have earned their designation as CPXPs.

With these two major milestones, (PX Body of Knowledge offered through The Beryl Institute and CPXP, offered through PXI) we felt there was a need and opportunity to support our community and aspiring CPXPs by providing a preparation course for those seeking CPXP Certification.  Using the Body of Knowledge course content and facilitated by the BOK faculty, 36 individuals participated in the first in person course offering held in conjunction with Patient Experience Conference 2017. It was an exciting moment seeing individuals with a variety of healthcare experiences from across the continuum of care participate in this interactive workshop. There were even a few individuals in the course currently not working in healthcare, but hoping to one day contribute to the patient experience movement in a future healthcare role. One participant shared, “I have a much clearer direction on how to prepare and a greater sense of confidence, having participated in this prep course.”

Achieving this milestone is an exciting and incredible reminder of how far patient experience has come. At the Institute, we understand and are committed to evolve our learning framework recognizing we have seasoned veterans in roles such as Chief Patient Experience Officers to those just entering the field and a range of individuals in between. If we believe all who work in healthcare are the patient experience then we understand we must continue to look for ways to support both individuals and organizations in their journey to provide excellence in experience.

Tags:  certificate program  certification  cpxp  framework  learning  networking  professional development  workshop 

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The Member Experience Reflects the Patient Experience

Posted By Denise R. Brown, Wednesday, March 8, 2017

My pathway to The Beryl Institute was more personal than professional. An innovative experienced association executive with over 30 years of membership and marketing experience in the non-profit community was my experience detailed on my resume; however, being a mom of a now 24-year old daughter diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) at the very young age of 13 is my personal patient experience backstory. Yes, I said 13. Unfortunately, she was the youngest to receive the diagnosis, and I was a mother not prepared mentally, emotionally and financially to deal with the journey that lie ahead. 

During that period, the Institute didn’t exist; however, I believe somewhere in the atmosphere, its creation was being conceived. Had it not been for the extraordinary care and education of the disease received from a multitude of facilities caring for and nurturing my daughter, we would not be in the place of peace and understanding where we reside to this day. Her MS is currently in remission and has been for the past 8 years. She’s living a full life independently working on her Master’s degree in Mental Health Counseling with the concentration on teens diagnosed with incurable diseases.

Since her diagnosis, my primary focus was to connect to organizations that provided a level of passion and patience for the community of individuals it serves that had a personal impact on my life. I was fortunate enough to connect with two…one, working for a counseling association for the past 10 years, to my current role which began on November 1, 2016, as Vice President, Membership with The Beryl Institute. In this role, focusing on the members’ needs, membership development, member satisfaction, member retention and acquisition efforts are my priority.

To gain insight into the membership of the Institute to ensure our members have the best membership experience possible and that our programs and events continue to exceed your expectations now and in the future, conducting a membership survey was essential. The survey addressed four broad areas:  

  • Member Demographics – Learn more about our members.
  • Perception of The Beryl Institute – Are we meeting your needs?
  • Membership Investment – Overall member satisfaction.
  • Challenges and Needs – What’s keeping you up at night?

We were encouraged by the strong participation from our members and look forward to implementing efforts that reflect your feedback. Here are a few highlights:

Demographics – The Institute’s membership is made up of members coming from across the continuum of care in primarily hospitals/healthcare systems; however, we are seeing growth in other areas and are excited by the opportunity to support the growing field of patient experience.

Perception – We are excited by how the community views the Institute and its valuable resources and that so many members want to spread the word about the Institute to their colleagues. Watch your emails in the coming months on how you can continue to be an Institute membership ambassador using a special resource toolkit designed to make talking about the benefits, products and services of the Institute a little easier.

Investment – The investment in the Institute supports the continued work of the patient experience community and the growing field. Improving the Value on Investment, which is those intangible assets of membership in Institute such as knowledge, processes, the organizational structure and ability to collaborate/network, will continue to be priority.

Challenges – Although faced with a variety of challenges, the common concerns were the patient’s experience, engagement of staff to physician and project time management.  Connecting to any one of the Institute’s Patient Experience Member Listservs provides a way of improving communication among your peers, offer a forum for exchanging ideas and allow you to benefit from the experience, knowledge and wisdom of others.

The information collected on the awareness of, use of, satisfaction with and perceived value or perceived importance of The Beryl Institute’s programs and services will provide the continued framework for assessing our current performance, modifying existing programs and services and the development of new offerings to deliver improved value to the patient experience community. 

The Institute is committed to being a leading organization that identifies and addresses member needs more effectively and one that provides an optimal suite of patient experience resources.

 

Denise R. Brown
Vice President, Membership
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  member value  membership  patient experience journey  personal experience  resources 

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