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We Each Hold a Piece to the Patient Experience Puzzle

Posted By Jason A. Wolf Ph.D. CPXP, Tuesday, July 01, 2014
Updated: Tuesday, July 01, 2014

In my most recent Hospital Impact blog I wrote:

Experience is designed to fit your organization and the people in your care. No one provider, no one vendor, no one organization holds the ultimate answer to the experience riddle. The greatest successes I see are those organizations willing to pull from the best of all they can, across all the information available, to meet their unique needs. In proceeding, choose partners and resources that value and integrate your own organizational identity in any plan. That will take you the farthest down the path to experience success.

As I further reflected on those words, I was quick to see and acknowledge a bias I bring to this work. Over the last four years in growing the Institute and through the many years of my career before, I have come to not only value, but also see the true impact that collaboration and the sharing of ideas can have in helping "raise all boats.” Yes, collaboration in organizational life is designed to collectively "raise the tide”. It is something I have often seen a lack of in the competitive landscape of healthcare overall.

I am not saying I do not believe that competition is of value, drives creativity, resourcefulness and positive outcomes; in fact I have seen it do just that. Rather, competition in the critical areas of organizational life, particularly in healthcare and specifically in the experience we provide for patients, their families and our very own staff members is not the greatest path to success. Without question, competition has been a motivating factor in experience, one seen driving action as scores are publicly reported and actual reimbursements and other financial opportunities are at stake. This is of value as the attention given to positive experience leads to better outcomes and holds the potential for establishing significant market distinction.

Yet, what I suggest is that beyond this drive for distinction, the opportunity to learn from one another provides the greatest of potential outcomes for all. The challenge is not (nor should it be) around what to do, but rather your actual commitment to do something about it. I have not visited one organization or engaged with one audience yet that did not already inherently understand the fundamentals to success in driving the best in experience. (Note in discussing experience, I maintain it is the integration of quality, safety and service encounters.) The distinguishing factor I have continued to see is leadership vision and commitment, a willingness to invest and follow through, the right people focused on the right things and the openness to reach out, share successes and learn from others. It is this focus on execution that should (and does) drive true distinction.

This very philosophy, learning from one another, especially in the experience arena, is the central ideology on which The Beryl Institute itself is built. That in creating a true community of practice, with individuals and organizations willing to share their successes and open up about their misses and needs, we have the potential for the greatest impact in healthcare today. It is about creating an organizational experience where individuals, organizations and resource providers can bring new ideas to bear as you determine the best path forward.

While this is built into everything we do throughout the year, it may be no better realized than in the few days we spend together at Patient Experience Conference or at our Regional Roundtables each year. In these few days together, hundreds of people representing hundreds of organizations around the world come together, not to declare "their” way is the right way, but rather to share their ideas as they might work for you. In bringing together the greatest number of voices, open to the broadest range of ideas, you position yourself well for success. In fact with Patient Experience Conference 2015 already on the books, I would be remiss if I didn't encourage you to share your ideas via a conference submission or ensure you have your attendance slotted for your 2015 budget. You also have two great opportunities to join us and our host organizations Virginia Mason Medical Center and Boston Children’s for two great roundtable experiences.

Again, I come back to my words I shared above - no one provider, no one vendor, no one organization holds the ultimate answer to the experience riddle. I would offer they each hold a little piece of the bigger puzzle. If we are willing to engage in the dialogue, ask for what we need and share what we know, we are all better for it. Then, it is each of our jobs to ensure it is done and done well.

Jason. A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Tags:  collaboration  culture  execution  expectations  healthcare  hospital impact  improving patient experience  Patient Experience  Patient Experience Conference  Regional Roundtable 

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Comments on this post...

Donna J. Ladd says...
Posted Tuesday, July 01, 2014
Okay Jason, I am using your statement as a quote, so thank you..,. Love it because this is so true and sums up the whole problem.

"The challenge is not (nor should it be) around what to do, but rather your actual commitment to do something about it."
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Stephanie A. Frederick says...
Posted Tuesday, July 01, 2014
All the "what we need to do" (passive) words are worn out. It's time to get active with the investment and follow-through that will result in a first-rate experience. Collaboration is a learned process, and it's time to start the lesson.....outside of the organizational silos. Thank you for another excellent post, Jason!
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